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With the evolving best practices and awareness around data privacy, Marketo will be upgrading how we handle form pre-fill. What change is being made? Starting April 24, 2019, Marketo will only pre-fill form fields if the URL used to navigate to the Marketo landing page contains a valid mkt_tok URL parameter value (which occurs when users click tracked links in Marketo emails). What that means is, any time a person is viewing a Marketo landing page with a form, the URL being used must contain the mkt_tok token in the query string, otherwise the form on that landing page will not be pre-filled. If the URL in the browser window does have a valid mkt_tok tracking token, then the form within the page will pre-fill as expected with data corresponding to the person record associated with that mkt_tok. Also note that if you are embedding Marketo Landing Pages within other web pages using an <iframe>, the mkt_tok would need to be passed from the parent page to the <iframe> URL if you intend for form prefill to work within the <iframe> ​How did it work before? Previously, Marketo landing pages would rely on Munchkin tracking cookies to identify known person records, and forms would pre-fill based on that cookie. Form pre-fill did not require being linked to a Marketo landing page from a tracked email link. Why is this changing? This upgrade is being made to provide a more consistent and more secure experience with Marketo’s forms. We have identified that, in the past, people have experienced scenarios where data pre-filled into a form didn’t always correspond with the actual person viewing the page. For example, people using a shared computer or those who may have been cookied incorrectly by clicking through a forwarded email, could end up viewing incorrect data associated with a different person. To provide a more consistent customer experience, and as a security enhancement, Marketo is upgrading the conditions under which the form pre-fill will display known customer information. In short, pre-fill will only work when users clickthrough links in Marketo emails, demonstrating that they have ownership of the email address associated with the known person record. Below is a list of different scenarios and how form pre-fill will work moving forward. Please note, these changes to form pre-fill will not affect any other functionality of Marketo Forms, including the progressive profiling feature. Scenario Will the form pre-fill? Notes Clicking a tracked link in a Marketo email to a Marketo landing page with a form which has pre-fill enabled Yes The email link must have mkt_tok enabled. Links that are not tracked or that have mkt_tok disabled will not work. Navigating directly to a Marketo landing page with a form which has pre-fill enabled No A direct link to the landing page will not have the mkt_tok present in the HTTP request. Refreshing a Marketo landing page with a form which has pre-fill enabled No The mkt_tok is stripped from the URL after Marketo Landing Pages load so refreshing the page will not include the mkt_tok in the URL. As a result, pre-fill will not work. Clicking a link in a sample email to a Marketo landing page with a form which has pre-fill enabled No The sample email will not have a valid mkt_tok attached to the link and so will not pre-fill the form. If you wish to test form pre-fill you will need to use a real email from a Marketo campaign. Navigating to a non-Marketo page that includes an embedded Marketo form which has pre-fill enabled No This behavior does not change with the upgrade. Pre-fill has never been supported for Marketo forms that are embedded on non-Marketo pages. Navigating to a non-Marketo page that includes an <iframe> pointing to a Marketo Landing Page that includes a form with pre-fill enabled With custom implementation The form within the Marketo Landing Page that is being loaded in the <iframe> will pre-fill if the mkt_tok value from the original HTTP request is passed along to the <iframe> URL Visiting a Marketo page with a mkt_tok that is not associated with the same person record as an existing Marketo Munchkin cookie currently stored on the browser No This will prevent the wrong person’s information from being displayed in cases where a computer is shared, or an email with a mkt_tok tracked link is forwarded to another person that may already be cookied as a known person in your database. Copying a Marketo tracked link from an email and sharing/pasting it externally (email, blog, chat, social media post, etc.) that enables another individual to click the tracked link Yes The tracked link in a Marketo email will redirect to a URL with the mkt_tok included, so anyone clicking this link will reach a page and see pre-fill data associated with the known person record from the “to” line of the email.
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  Welcome to Marketo Support This guide provides individual links that covers the following topics: Marketo Support Policies Service Level Agreement How to Contact Marketo Support How to Submit a Case Tips on Effective Case Submission Managing Authorized Support Contacts (Support Admins) Managing Your Cases How to Escalate    
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Setting an email to "operational" does the following No unsubscribe link automatically added Email will be sent to leads set to Unsubscribed Email will be sent to leads set to Marketing Suspended   Note - when sending an operational message, Unsubscribed and Marketing Suspended leads will still be included in the "blocked from email" count on the schedule tab of the campaign.   When is it OK to use the operational setting?   Sending marketing email to unsubscribed addresses is illegal. For this reason, you should be extremely careful to only use this setting in extremely limited circumstances. Using this setting incorrectly violates Marketo's Terms of Service, and most antispam laws. There may be legal consequences for using this setting incorrectly. Good uses of the operational setting fall into two categories: Transactional messages Relationship messages   What's a transactional message? A transactional message is part of a transaction that a lead has initiated and you are responding to. Here's some examples of transactional messages: Receipts for purchases Registration confirmations Download links in response to form fill-outs Requested assets (whitepapers, spec sheets, etc.)   What's a relationship message? A relationship message describes something that affects your business relationship with the lead. Here's some examples of relationship messages: Downtime notifications Changes to terms of service Recall notices End of service notifications   Operational messages should not contain any marketing content at all. In other words, do not use the operational setting to send a message that contains a receipt and a promotion, only a receipt.
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Issue Description Link(s) placed into Email(s) by a Token is not tracked and does not show successful click activity in the lead/person record. Issue Resolution Sometimes there are situations in which URLs, and other content, are placed in emails by using {{tokens}}. When Marketo sends emails, you can think of building the email in 2 steps: Marketo searches the email code for "http" or "https" and wraps the tracking code around the URL Marketo inserts the values of {{tokens}} into the email. If the {{token}} value is http://www.domain.com , that would be expected to not track because of the above 2 steps. After the {{token}} value is inserted, Marketo does not go back to wrap tracking code around http/https. The {{token}} doesn't look like a URL when the system applies the tracking code because the tokens don't pull the values in until the next step after. The solution to tracking tokens is to place http:// or https:// on the outside of the token, like such: http:// {{token}} That way, when Marketo builds the email, in step #1, the system recognizes the http and knows it's a URL. Then the tracking is wrapped around the http and the {{token}} as well. Then in step #2, the {{token}} value is inserted into an already-wrapped link. A unique caveat to keep in mind is that if the {{token}} value contains http, but http is on the outside of the {{token}}. Let's say the URL you want to insert is http://www.domain.com . You have to move the http:// out in front of the {{token}}, but you don't want to also have it inside the {{token}} as well. If your link ends up being http://http://www.domain.com it will break. To get around this, you'll need to remember to take the http:// out of the {{token}} value. {{http://www.domain.com}} would instead be http://{{www.domain.com}}
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  So you’ve now used the previous document (Getting Started With Guided Landing Pages:) to download a template from our library and set it up in your Marketo instance, you have even used it to make a landing page or two and you’ve customized those landing pages, AND you’ve even gone the extra mile and customized your template and modified some elements! (Editing Marketo Guided Landing Page Templates, Pt. 1 - Elements:) All of which is fantastic news! Good job!   But if you recall from the article that showed you how to edit Elements on the template, I skipped right over the section on Variables. This is the piece that this document is designed to tackle.   So what is a variable? If you edit a Guided Landing Page you will see a panel on the right hand side that displays both Elements and Variables. In this instance, the variables do everything from assigning a gradient color, to deciding if you want to display or hide different sections of the landing page.   Modifying a variable in the landing page editor is designed to be really simple, just click the variable you want to change and give it a new value. Here I changed the Primary Gradient 1 and 2 from 1DA083 and 0F3450 to A00E35 and F2F2F2 respectively and the landing page changes:   At its easiest to understand, a variable works a lot like a token in an email. It’s a placeholder for actual code to be used later. So if I create an email that starts with “Hello, {{lead.firstname:default=Friend}}!” you can tell right away what that’s going to do. Pull the first name from the lead record, if none exists use the word “Friend”.   Think of a Variable as a token that you get to define as well as use. The first step is to define it and the second step is to actually call back to the variable you defined.   While it’s easy for a non-technical user to use a variable (as it should be!), setting one up in the template does require a fair amount of HTML knowledge. As stated before, if you are not comfortable editing HTML and do not have a resource available to you, please reach out to services@marketo.com, they are able to assist with any sort of coding needs.   So as before, let’s dive into the template, this time we’re going straight for the Variable code.       <!-- Marketo Variable Definitions -->     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient1" mktoName="Primary Gradient 1" default="#1da083">     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient2" mktoName="Primary Gradient 2" default="#0f3450">   So right at the start of the template, we’re off to the races defining variables. As you can see with the Gradient 1 and Gradient 2, these are both marked with a class of “mktoColor”.   As with the Elements, the full list of Variable types can be found here: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Create+a+Guided+Landing+Page+Template        class : "mktoString"      class : "mktoColor"      class : "mktoBoolean"   A string is a variable that contains a value, Color should be obvious what that does and Boolean is a yes or no choice.   In addition to the class, each variable has to have a unique ID. This is critical and used when the variable is called later on down the page. When you call a variable it’s always with the syntax of ${id name}. So in this case ${gradient1} and ${gradient2}. As you can see it looks a LOT like a token but it’s a token you can name whatever you want.   The mktoName is how it displays the variable in the Landing Page editor.   The default value is what it starts out with.   So let’s take a look and see how these Gradients are applied now that they’re defined at the top of the template.   Color is typically used in the CSS portion of the header. As defined in the previous document, CSS stands for “Cascading Style Sheets” and is a way of formatting the same thing over and over again, kind of like setting a font in a word processor.       /* Header Gradient */     #is {         top: 0;         width: 100%;         min-height: 620px;         position: relative;         z-index: 1;         color: #fff; padding-top: 10%;                 background-image: linear-gradient(${gradient1},${gradient2});     }   Now normally in CSS, the linear-gradient option would have two colors listed, the top color and the bottom color and it provides a gradual transition from one to the other.   We could just as easily change this in the template to        background-image: linear-gradient(red,white);   But the problem doing that is that an end user, who is only using the Landing Page Editor, would not be able to change it. The gradient would be defined in the template and inaccessible to the Editor.   Changing these values to the variables defined before allows the user to change the first and second colors in the Landing Page editor interface.   In Summary:   The Meta Tags define what the variables mean:     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient1" mktoName="Primary Gradient 1" default="#1da083">     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient2" mktoName="Primary Gradient 2" default="#0f3450">   The ID= is then used to call the variable and put it into action:       background-image: linear-gradient(${gradient1},${gradient2});   The other benefit to doing it this way is you can re-use the same variable over and over again. Look at this piece of CSS:   body {                 background: ${gradient2};         margin: 0;         color: #696E74;     }   That’s the same ID as the gradient we used before, only applied to a different section. This ensures that the bottom color of the gradient and the background of this section will always be the same color.   Any item in the CSS that contains a text value, a color value or a yes/no choice can be converted to a Variable.   Here’s another common usage:   You’re using a form on your landing page, but you want the end user to be able to change the text on the submit button.   As before you define the variable:        <meta class="mktoString" id="section4ButtonLabel" mktoName="Sec. 4 Button Label" default="More Questions?">   Then farther down the page where the button appears you call the variable you defined before:        <div class="centered mtb">           <a href="${section4ButtonLink}"><button class="btn btn-lg btn-green mt">           ${section4ButtonLabel}</button></a>      </div>   The <a href= is pulling a http link that the user can define in the editor, the button class is setting up a green button as defined in the CSS, and there is our Variable to display the label which reads “More Questions?” Here’s what it looks like in the editor:   So this is great, and it makes sense because you can see this was all set up and defined by a professional. What if you wanted to add your own? Is that even possible?   Naturally it is!   First, figure out what you want to convert to a Variable. Is it a piece of text like a button name or a link? Is it a color? Is it a yes/no choice?   Let’s say we want to add a variable that controls the color of the buttons. We have two, both using the same color green, and we want whoever is running the landing page editor to change that without having to go to the template:   Step 1: Define your variable:        <meta class="mktoColor" id="ButtonColor" mktoName="Button Color" default="#1DA083">   We’re talking about colors so the class will be “mktoColor”. The ID can be anything we want it to be as can be the mktoName. The default is the same lovely green shade as was used before.   Now we need to call this color.  Looking at the CSS, we can see the .btn-green is defined as this:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: #1da083;           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }   The background is the color we want to change to a Variable so it can be edited without having to access the template.   Change the code to this:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: ${ButtonColor};           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }     Approve the template and check out the landing page in the editor:     Well that’s fantastic, but there’s a separate color for the border, we could just as easily add a variable for it as well:        border: 4px solid #1da083;   We don’t want to HAVE to add another new variable for just the border. We could change the border at the same time as the button. By changing #1da083; to ${ButtonColor};   The trick now becomes what if you change your mind? What if you have a variable in the template that is no longer desired? How do you get rid of it?   Remember each variable is two pieces, the definition and the call. You have to remove BOTH pieces. Technically removing the call would be enough to prevent the change from being made on the page, but the definition is what makes the variable appear in the Landing Page Editor, if you only removed the call then there would be a non-functional Variable in the landing page editor.   So in the case of our button color:   Step 1 would be to strip out the meta tag containing the definition:     Step 2 would be changing the variable name where it’s being used to some fixed value:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: ${ButtonColor}; -> change this to some other fixed color. #00FF33; or the original #1da083;.           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }   Doing both pieces will prevent the Variable from being listed in the Landing Page Editor and prevent it from having any effect on the page.  
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  Marketo now fully supports responsive landing pages, we call the new style a "Guided Landing Page". A Guided Landing Page is one that is capable of dynamically resizing itself for different window sizes and devices. If you’ve used the Marketo interface to set up an Email Template and an Email, the basic concept of setting up a responsive template and landing page will feel pretty familiar.   First you have to define a template that contains the editable areas of the landing page, once that is completed you use that template to build the landing page. Unlike the Email editor however, constructing and altering a responsive landing page template will require a minor amount of HTML knowledge.   If you are not comfortable in HTML and do not have an HTML developer available to assist you, Marketo’s services team can help! You can reach them at services@marketo.com   To get started, first visit our Template Library for Guided Landing Page Templates located here: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Guided+Landing+Page+Templates;jsessionid=5D71353C1CBF708DEC3DAB1588E78B4F     Select the template you’d like to use, right click the link and select “Save Link As” to download the HTML code.   Once the template is saved locally on your computer, go to where it’s saved and open it in the text editor of your choice. What you’ll see is a whole bunch of HTML:     In your text editor, use CTRL-A to select all and CTRL-C to copy it to the clip-board. (On a Mac this is Command-A and Command-C) then log on to your Marketo instance.   In your Marketo instance, go to the Design Studio and select “New Landing Page Template”     In the New Landing Page Template window, assign your template a folder and a name, then make sure the editing mode is “Guided”. The “Free-form” mode is for the non-responsive templates that we had before. Click “Create”!     Now we’re ready to replace the sample template code with the code you downloaded from the Template Library.   CTRL-A (Command-A on a Mac) will select the starter code and CTRL-V (Command-V) will paste the template code right over the top of the existing code. The template will save itself automatically when finished.     Now that the template is ready to go, we’re ready to see it in action!   Using a Marketo Guided Landing Page Template:   Now that we have a template created, we’re ready to start using it. Close the template tab where the code is and go back to the Design Studio.   Select the template you just created and approve it.     Once the template is approved, you can use it to create a landing page. In the new landing page window, assign a folder and a name and select the template you just created. Click “Create”!   You can always identify which templates are responsive and which are not by looking for a little window icon on the right hand side. If the window icon is present then that template was created using the new Guided editor and is fully responsive. If the window is not present, then that template was created using the old editor and it’s NOT responsive. You cannot automatically convert an old non-responsive template to a new one.   Congratulations! Your new responsive template is ready to use!   Please see our documentation here on how to edit a Guided Landing Page:   https://docs.marketo.com/pages/releaseview.action?pageId=7515306      
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  This is a article attached image Upon signing a contract with Marketo you are provisioned a Marketo instance and a Support Service. There are four different types of Support Services which are available to meet different customer support needs: Online (Legacy) Business  or PREMIER SUPPORT BUSINESS (Legacy) Premier or PREMIER SUPPORT ENTERPRISE (Legacy) Elite or PREMIER SUPPORT ELITE Each Support Service has a different Service Level Target (SLT). An SLT is the amount of time Marketo Support targets to make first contact with you after a support case has been submitted. SLTs differ for each Support Service and priority level. Priority levels range from Priority P1 to Priority P4. Here are the SLTs and priority levels for each Support Service:   Priority Online (Legacy) Business PREMIER SUPPORT BUSINESS (Legacy) Premier PREMIER SUPPORT ENTERPRISE (Legacy) Elite PREMIER SUPPORT ELITE P1 1 hour 1 hour 1 hour 30 minutes 30 minutes 30 minutes 15 minutes P2 4 hours 3 hours 2 hours 2 hours 1 hour 2 hours 30 minutes P3 6 hours 5 hours 4 hours 4 hours 2 hours 2 hours 1 hour P4 3 days 1 day 1 day 1 day 1 day 1 day 1 day   Here are the descriptions for each priority level: Priority Description P1 Mission Critical:  Core business function down or potential loss of mission critical data P2 Urgent:  Major feature or workflow is not functioning. Mission critical workflow and majority of user community is not blocked P3 Important:  Normal usability or task completion is impacted but functional, or workaround is available P4 Minor:  Minor issue requiring a correction. Normal workflow is not impacted   Find more information About Support here!  
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Issue How to setup the favicon, aka Favorites Icon for Marketo Landing Pages. Solution Steps to Setting up Favicon 1. Ensure you have the favicon hosted either externally or internally in Marketo. (Don't know how to find the link of a image hosted in Marketo? Check this DOC out) 2. On the Landing Page Settings ensure that option 'Remove default favicon links' is selected. Note that this affects all landing pages globally (scroll down in the settings, it might be hiding) [Related DOC ] 3. You can specify the favicon in two ways:    a. Directly on the landing page in the custom HTML Header [Related DOC ]    b. In the Landing Page Template's Header 4. This code would need to be specified in the header <link rel="shortcut icon" href=" <favicon url> " type="image/x-icon" > <link rel="icon" href=" <favicon url> " type="image/x-icon" > 5. Test the landing page out by either opening it in a different browser or clearing the browser cache and restarting the browser.
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  What is the Email API? What is the Email API used for? What is Email 2.0? Does the Email API Work on Email 2.0 Assets? Will the Email API Break when Enabling Email Experience 2.0? How Are 1.0 Assets Upgraded to 2.0 Assets? What to Do When an Email Was Accidentally Converted to Email 2.0 format?     What is the Email API? API stands for Application Programming Interface and the Email API allows an automated process to create and edit emails in Marketo. There are also other API calls that involve emails, such as Approve Snippet (assuming the Snippet is used in an Email) and Clone Program (assuming the Program contains Emails). There are also API calls to create and update Email Templates. Essentially, the API can do many things that you can also do through the Marketo user interface, but then in an automated fashion.     What is the Email API used for? There are many scenarios: an external system could create Emails in Marketo using data that lives outside of Marketo. A translation service provider could clone a master Email, translate it to many languages, then save them back into Marketo as localized Emails. A reporting system could extract Emails from Marketo to use in reports that are generated outside of Marketo. An external system could Clone a Program that contains Emails, then populate the Program Tokens and schedule the Email to be sent out at a specific time. There could be an external email template creation system that creates new Email templates in Marketo through the API.     What is Email 2.0? “Email Experience 2.0” is the new Marketo product feature with the enhanced email editor, documented here: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Email+Editor+v2.0+Overview. It can be switched on in Admin > Email > Edit Email Editor Settings. All Emails and Email Templates also have a version number, either 1.0 (the old version) or 2.0 (the new version). If we refer to “Email 2.0 asset” we mean an email or email template in the new upgraded 2.0 format.     Does the Email API Work on Email 2.0 Assets? Yes.     Will the Email API Break when Enabling Email Experience 2.0? No. Enabling Email 2.0 will not automatically upgrade Emails or Email Templates to the new 2.0 format. The Email API can still create new Emails and Email Templates in the 1.0 format.  However – after enabling Email 2.0 – any Email or Email Template that is created or edited and approved through the Marketo User Interface will automatically be upgraded to the 2.0 format.     How Are 1.0 Assets Upgraded to 2.0 Assets? If you edit an “Approved" or “Approved with Draft” 1.0 Email with Email 2.0 enabled, the draft is converted to the 2.0 format. You can still discard the draft to go back to the approved 1.0 format. Once you approve the email and it becomes 2.0, the Email cannot be converted back to 1.0. If you edit a “Draft” 1.0 Email (never been approved), this will automatically be converted to 2.0 with no option to revert back to the 1.0 format. The same applies to Email Templates.     What to Do When an Email Was Accidentally Converted to Email 2.0 format? If an Email or Email Template was accidentally converted to the 2.0 format, you’d have to copy the asset contents to a text editor, disable Email 2.0, then create a new 1.0 asset using the content that you copied.
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Issue Clearing cache and cookies in your browser will fix a number of different problems related to page display, browser errors, and login issues.     Solution Here are links to the support articles on how to clear cache and cookies for the most commonly used browsers. Chrome Clear cache and cookies - Computer - Google Account Help   FireFox How to clear the Firefox cache | Firefox Help   Safari Safari for Mac: Manage cookies and website data using Safari   Internet Explorer https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/278835/how-to-delete-cookie-files-in-internet-explorer   Microsoft Edge Microsoft Edge, browsing data, and privacy – Microsoft privacy    
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Marketo users can configure Marketo to manage, nurture, and measure leads that are created from Google AdWords. We offer 2 options, depending on what type of web page is linked to your Google AdWords ad. Option 1: Link Google Adwords Ad to a Marketo Landing Page with a Form   This solution does not require custom coding This solution does not require any additional cost Option 2: Link a Google Adwords Ad to Any Page on your Website This solution does require custom coding so that you can capture the PPC (pay per click) information when the lead comes back 'later' to fill out a form on your page Depending on whether you have resources internally to do the custom coding, this solution may or may not require additional cost Reporting Available (for both Option 1 and 2) Number of new leads acquired by Google Adwords Program Cost per new lead acquired by Google Adwords Program Number of leads acquired by keyword/search phrase Top 10 keywords/search phrases which acquired new leads Top 10 AdWords CampaignID which acquired new leads Number of Opportunities by keyword/search phrase Number of Opportunities by CampaignID Additional Reporting Available if you have Revenue Cycle Analytics/Explorer Conversion ratio of your Google Adwords Return to investment for your Google Adwords Top 10 keywords by month report which shows Average days to convert to opportunity Number of leads converted to opportunity Top 10 CampaignID’s by month report which shows Average days to convert to opportunity Number of leads converted to opportunity Program Channel report >> Google Adwords (custom channel) metrics by quarter New names, cost per new name Opportunity units, Pipeline generated, revenue, revenue to investment     Learn more:   Linking a Google Adwords Ad to a Marketo Landing Page with a Form Linking a Google Adwords Ad to Any Page on Your Website Google Adwords and Marketo FAQs  
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Issue How to use tokens to personalize some of the information displayed in a Marketo form.     Solution It is possible to use Marketo tokens in the following form elements: Field Labels - Edit a Field Label in a Form Hint Text - Add Hint Text to a Form Field Tooltip Instructions - Add Tooltip Instructions to a Form Field Fieldset Text - Add a FieldSet to a Form Rich Text boxes - Add Rich Text to a Form
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    Overview Add Leads to Static Lists Use Custom Fields Overview Lead records have two primary components – lead attributes and activity logs. Lead attributes are the fields and field values within the lead record. For example, Job Title is a lead attribute. Lead Name is a lead attribute. Activity logs record the actions Marketo or the lead themselves have taken. For example, sending an email to a lead is an activity that would show in the activity log. If the lead opens the email or visits a tracked page, those activities would show in the activity log as well.   Activities in the activity log are only retained for 90 days, 25 months, or 37 if you have purchased the premium data retention option. The official Marketo Data Retention Policy can be found here:  Marketo Activities Data Retention Policy   The main way to store activity data beyond the Data Retention Policy timeframe is to use the Bulk Extract API. There are two other ways you can keep a reference of these activities after the end of the Data Retention period, and they can be referenced within the Marketo UI. This article will show you how that can be done.     Add Leads to Static Lists Static lists will retain lead membership even if the activity of adding the lead to the list has been removed. This will let you have lists dedicated to specific criteria that would otherwise be removed after the data retention time period has been passed.   For example, Smart Campaign membership history is not retained after 25 months. If you are searching for members of a Smart Campaign, but a lead first became a member of the Smart Campaign more than 25 months ago, the search results would not include that lead.   An easy way to work around that is to add your leads to a static list as part of the flow of the campaign. When creating your Smart Campaign, create a new static list with the same corresponding name (makes it easier to identify later). When building the flow of your campaign, add the "Add to List" flow step so that all leads going through the campaign will be logged on the list.         Use Custom Fields Lead attributes and their field values are not affected by the Data Retention Policy. Use Smart Campaigns to populate custom fields with values based on activities your leads take. This will allow you to filter leads by these lead attributes that are not affected by the Data Retention Policy. A side benefit to this is that it is faster to search by lead attributes than by searching through lead activity logs.   Example: This approach can work for many different activities, but let’s use form fill outs as an example.   Let’s say you want to be able to identify leads who have been very active and have filled out more than 5 forms over their lifecycle. You could use the filter “Filled Out Form” with the “Min. Number of Times” constraint set to 5. However, if one of those forms filled out occurred more than 25 months ago, the filter would only be able to access 4 form fill activities in the activity log. Therefore, the lead would not pass the filter.   Instead of using the “Filled Out Form” filter, set up a Smart Campaign to write to custom fields that show you how many forms they’ve filled out, and when the first one was. Here’s how to do it:   1. Create two new custom fields in Marketo, one Score Field, and the second a Date Field.   2. Create a new Smart Campaign   3. Add the trigger “Fills Out Form” set to “is any” to the Campaign Smart List     4. Add these two Flow Steps to the Campaign Flow: Flow Step 1 : “Change Score” Score Field Name: your score field name Change: +1   Flow Step 2 : “Change Data Value” Add Choice to Flow Step Choice 1: If “your score field name”  “is empty” Attribute “your score field name” New Value: {{system.date}} Default Choice: Do Nothing       This campaign will listen for any time a lead fills out a form, add +1 to your score field, and if it’s the very first form they’ve ever filled out, it will log the date of when it was done. If the lead has ever filled out a form in the past, there will already be a date value in the date field, so the flow choice would just skip over it and do nothing.       Results You’ll See: With the original goal of identifying leads who have filled out more than 5 forms you’ll be able to filter for leads that have filled out at least 5 forms. In addition, this campaign will let you search for leads based on when they had filled out their very first form, regardless of how long ago it was. Since it’s stored in a lead field, it’s a lead attribute that is not affected by the Data Retention Policy at all.        
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By default, required fields on Marketo forms show a red asterisk to indicate that they're required. Here's how you can remove or change it.   Please ensure that you have access to an experienced Web developer. Marketo Technical Support is not set up to assist with troubleshooting code. Removing the asterisk The following CSS will remove the asterisk from your code. You can add this to one landing page by dragging in a Custom HTML element and pasting this in, or you can add it to your landing page template so it affects all your forms. <style type="text/css">   form.lpeRegForm li.mktFormReq label {     background: none !important;   } </style >   Changing the asterisk To change the required symbol, you need an image that you'd like to display instead of the asterisk. It needs to be 16x16px, and ideally you should make the background transparent. Create that image, then upload it to Marketo. Get the URL for that image, then add this CSS to your landing pages: <style type="text/css">   form.lpeRegForm li.mktFormReq label {     background:url(' [image URL goes here] ') no-repeat scroll right 0 transparent;   } </style>
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  Marketo Support's Mission is:   "To provide fast and friendly world-class support through creative, flexible solutions to empower Marketo Automation Software success."   Areas of Responsibility: Technical Support Engineers (TSEs) are your initial point of contact for any questions or concerns. TSEs are responsible for troubleshoot issues within your Marketo instance. Common areas within a Marketo instances which TSEs will assist with are:   My Marketo Marketing Activities Design Studio Lead Database Analytics Revenue Explorer (RCA/RCE) Calendar Deliverability Tools Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Web Personalization (RTP) Admin Community   Our TSEs are not web developers and as a result they are unable to troubleshoot most types of custom coding (ie. HTML, JavaScript, XML, etc.). Our support team is able to help with the following types of non-custom code:    Simple Munchkin Code Asynchronous Munchkin Code Asynchronous jQuery Munchkin Code SOAP API REST API   Our technical support engineers are here to assist you and our support commitment to our customers is to always work towards providing an above and beyond support experience.   Note: Our team is not against looking at custom code and, based on the subject matter expertise, our TSEs might be able to offer suggestions and recommendations, but we do want to make it clear that they are not responsible for fixing or updating any custom code that has been implemented.   Response Time   Our Technical Support Engineers are bound to responding to your cases and issues within the Service Level Agreements from your account's level of support services.  We track response milestones to ensure that your cases are being handled in a timely manner as dictated by our agreed to Service Level Targets.
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To enhance the stability of Marketo’s email assembly infrastructure, we are disabling some Velocity Script functionality on June 14, 2019. What change is being made? The following Velocity Tools will permanently be disabled for use in email script, on June 14, 2019. My Tokens: classTool contextTool resourceTool Some common use examples of these tools include: $class. getClass() $context. When are these changes taking effect? These changes will take effect in the June 2019 Release on June 14, 2019. How did it work before? The way Velocity Tools are used in your email scripts is highly dependent on the structure of your code and varies on a case-by-case basis. To identify how you are currently utilizing Velocity Tools in your email design, please consult directly with your developer. Documentation on each tool can be found on Apache’s website at the links below: classTool : https://velocity.apache.org/tools/devel/apidocs/org/apache/velocity/tools/generic/ClassTool.html contextTool: https://velocity.apache.org/tools/devel/apidocs/org/apache/velocity/tools/generic/ContextTool.html resourceTool: https://velocity.apache.org/tools/devel/apidocs/org/apache/velocity/tools/generic/ResourceTool.html Why is this changing? We regularly review our infrastructure to ensure it meets the highest standards for stability and security. During a recent review, we identified that a small subset of Velocity Tools could potentially impact the health of our message assembly servers, and as a result, we made the decision to disable these permanently. What do I need to do? If you are currently using Velocity Tools in your email scripting, you will need to review and update your script to use alternate methods before June 14, 2019. Documentation on supported Velocity Scripting can be found on our Developers’ site at http://developers.marketo.com/email-scripting/. Any email script tokens still referencing Velocity Tools after the June 14, 2019 deadline could fail to compile, resulting in emails not rendering as expected or complete send failure. We have identified impacted customers using these Velocity Tools and will alert them individually via Marketo Notifications. Considering the customized nature of Velocity Scripting, Marketo Support is not able to assist with the authoring or troubleshooting of custom code. Please reach out to your developer for assistance. If you no longer have access to a technical resource, you may also contact your CSM to coordinate a scoping call with our Professional Services team.
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Issue What is the difference between mktNoTrack and  mktNoTok? Solution Adding the mktNoTrack class to an email link tells Marketo not to add a tracking link to the URL. Without the tracking link, the recipient is not redirected through the tracking server before going to the target URL. Use this when you specifically don't want to track Clicked Link in Email events in the Marketo database. Adding the mktNoTok class to an email link tells Marketo not to add the _mkt_tok parameter to the target link.  Used when the target link does not behave properly, for example, a mailto: link that should not have extraneous URL info or a static file that won't download when there are query parameters. The click activity will still be tracked, but the associated lead info will not be carried onto the page for use in functions such as form prefill.
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Issue The URL for the landing page shows as "https" even though you do not have SSL set up on your Marketo instance, causing the browser to display a "Not Secure" warning.   Solution This can happen if the primary domain and DNS are SSL secure, but Marketo is not.  For instance, if your primary domain is " https://www.mycompany.com " (SSL secure) then the DNS, which is also SSL secure, will push down the "https" transfer protocol down to all the CNAMEs on that DNS.  This will force the Marketo landing page using the CNAME to use "https" in the URL, even though it is not secure. There are two ways to resolve this: Work with your IT department to see if there is a non-SSL option for your DNS Purchase SSL for your Marketo instance so that both your primary domain and your Marketo pages are SSL secure. If you would like to add SSL to your Marketo instance, please contact your Account Manager to see about adding that to your subscription.     
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Issue Links sent to a customer using AppleMail are not rendering properly. Solution This issue is cause when there is no protocol assigned to a link so AppleMail appends applewebdata:// to the beginning of the url instead of HTTP:// or HTTPS:// The work-around for this is to include the protocol in the link. If there's no protocol (e.g. http:// ) then the rendering engine will insert applewebdata:// as the protocol for any links.     
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  Marketo Champions are customers who have demonstrated outstanding leadership in the Marketo Community, are experts in Marketo products, are avid contributors in the social world, and are loyal advocates of the Marketo brand. Benefits and perks our Champions receive include:   Access: Meetings with our product and marketing teams to give exclusive feedback Previews: Given early previews to products, features, and releases when available Publicity: Exclusive speaking opportunities at our annual Marketo Summit and other events Networking: Special networking events with Marketo executives and fellow Champions and semi-annual conference calls Ownership: Ownership of content and exclusive activities at our annual Marketo Summit that showcase your expertise and thought leadership Credibility: Special Champion badge on Marketo Community profiles, and profiled on Marketo's corporate website Sweet Swag: Champion-exclusive swag To find out more information and apply, click here. To view a complete list of current Champions, click here. Join the Marketo Elite Today!  
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