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Summary Handling 606 rate limiting, 607 daily quota, and 615 concurrency errors. Issue An API user is receiving rate (606), quota (607), or concurrency (615) errors when connecting to the Marketo Engage REST API. The errors will be evident in the responses to the requests creating them and in admin notifications as a web services error notification.    Solution The Marketo Engage REST API is protected by 3 limitations on the number of requests made: daily quota, request rate, and the number of simultaneous/concurrent requests. The errors generated when on of these limits is exceeded are recoverable by waiting the appropriate amount of time before retrying the request. Daily Quota: Error Code 607 This error indicates that the number of requests made since 12:00AM CST has exceeded the daily quota. The daily quota varies and can be found in your Admin->Web Services menu.  Contact your account manager if you require increased daily quota. Rate Limit: Error Code 606 and Concurrency Limit: Error Code 615 Handling concurrency and rate limiting errors is similar. In each case, the request should be tried again after a waiting period. At most 10 requests can be processed by any Marketo Engage instance at a time. Error code 615 will be returned if there are already 10 open HTTP connections to the instance's REST API and an attempt is made to create an 11th connection. At most, 100 requests can be processed by any Marketo Engage instance in any rolling 20 second window of time. Error code 606 will be returned if there have already been 100 requests in the last 20 seconds. In both cases, an exponential backoff retry strategy will allow your application to eventually make a successful request. All popular web development languages have libraries available which implement exponential backoff: using an existing library is highly recommended. Unlike daily quota which an be increased through your account manager, rate and  concurrency limits cannot be changed. Further Reading For information on implementing your own exponential backoff algorithm, see Devopedia's article on Binary Exponential Backoff. For more best practices to apply when using the Marketo Engage REST API, see this page.
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Issue What does the Data Value Change activity with following reasons mean? System flow action sysActionChangeDataValue updateLeadEmailStatus System flow action sysActionChangeDataValue resetLeadEmailStatus Solution Both Data Value Change activity reasons are a result of an automated process known as Durable Unsubscribe https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Durable+Unsubscribe 'updateLeadEmailStatus' refers to durable unsubscribe updating existing records. So when a record's unsubscribe value get's manually changed, the other duplicate record(s) that has the same email address will get updated by the durable unsubscribe and 'updateLeadEmailStatus' will be logged for the updated leads. Whereas, 'resetLeadEmailStatus' refers to durable unsubscribe updating a new record, when its existing duplicate record(s) that has the same email address have 'unsubscribed=true'. So when a new record is created and the other duplicate records have 'unsubscribed=true', the new record will be updated by durable unsubscribe and 'resetLeadEmailStatus' will be logged for the new record. The 'resetLeadEmailStatus' can also occur as follows: Existing lead in Marketo has unsubscribed value set to 'True' Lead is imported into Marketo with unsubscribed value set to 'False'. Momentarily, we can see this reflected in Marketo. Lead's unsubscribed value is changed back to 'True' with reason 'resetLeadEmailStatus'. This is because "When a lead is imported, the unsubscribe flag WILL NOT be overwritten by the import." Durable Unsubscribe
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Yes. There is a daily/weekly Recommended Assets email report that can be configured to be sent to users. Recommended Assets Report This email report includes all the pieces of content and count of clicks on the Content Recommendation Bar. To customize which automated email report the user receives, see: Email Reports - Marketo Docs - Marketo User Manual .
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When trying to sync updates to your salesforce.com instance from Marketo you see one of the following errors in the activity log : Failed: INSUFFICIENT_ACCESS_ON_CROSS_REFERENCE_ENTITY INSUFFICIENT_ACCESS_OR_READONLY INVALID_CROSS_REFERENCE_KEY This is an error sent to Marketo from Salesforce. There are a number of reasons why this error could occur. INSUFFICIENT_ACCESS_ON_CROSS_REFERENCE_ENTITY means that the user who is trying to make the update does not have access to a related element that is required for the record to be updated and saved in SFDC. There are a number of specific examples of what might be the cause but these will vary from organisation to organization depending on the configuration of your salesforce.com. If you were to connect to sfdc as the Marketo user and try manually updating the same record that Marketo is trying to update then you will get the same error in the salesforce.com UI. Here are a list of some elements that you should check in SFDC if you see this error: Do you use record types? If so make sure that the the Marketo user has access to all required record types and that the Record Type Id in Marketo is correct for the Lead or Contact. Sometimes, when a Lead is converted to a Contact in SFDC, the Record Type ID fails to update in Marketo, causing the sync to fail. This is one of the most common causes for these errors. Are there any look-up or master detail fields on the object in question? If these types of fields are being updated then make sure that the Marketo user has access this object/ these records. Do you use Apex? If so you may have trigger that fire on the the update of a record, you will need to make sure that the Marketo user has profile access to the relevant Apex classes. If you have any workflow rules or assignment rules that send an email when the record is saved then you will need to make sure that the Marketo user has the send email permission and has access to the email folder that contains the mails that are sent rules are triggered. Make sure "Convert Leads" is turned-on within SFDC.  If it is not, you will get this error message when trying to merge leads that exist within Marketo and SFDC.  
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  So you’ve now used the previous document (Getting Started With Guided Landing Pages:) to download a template from our library and set it up in your Marketo instance, you have even used it to make a landing page or two and you’ve customized those landing pages, AND you’ve even gone the extra mile and customized your template and modified some elements! (Editing Marketo Guided Landing Page Templates, Pt. 1 - Elements:) All of which is fantastic news! Good job!   But if you recall from the article that showed you how to edit Elements on the template, I skipped right over the section on Variables. This is the piece that this document is designed to tackle.   So what is a variable? If you edit a Guided Landing Page you will see a panel on the right hand side that displays both Elements and Variables. In this instance, the variables do everything from assigning a gradient color, to deciding if you want to display or hide different sections of the landing page.   Modifying a variable in the landing page editor is designed to be really simple, just click the variable you want to change and give it a new value. Here I changed the Primary Gradient 1 and 2 from 1DA083 and 0F3450 to A00E35 and F2F2F2 respectively and the landing page changes:   At its easiest to understand, a variable works a lot like a token in an email. It’s a placeholder for actual code to be used later. So if I create an email that starts with “Hello, {{lead.firstname:default=Friend}}!” you can tell right away what that’s going to do. Pull the first name from the lead record, if none exists use the word “Friend”.   Think of a Variable as a token that you get to define as well as use. The first step is to define it and the second step is to actually call back to the variable you defined.   While it’s easy for a non-technical user to use a variable (as it should be!), setting one up in the template does require a fair amount of HTML knowledge. As stated before, if you are not comfortable editing HTML and do not have a resource available to you, please reach out to services@marketo.com, they are able to assist with any sort of coding needs.   So as before, let’s dive into the template, this time we’re going straight for the Variable code.       <!-- Marketo Variable Definitions -->     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient1" mktoName="Primary Gradient 1" default="#1da083">     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient2" mktoName="Primary Gradient 2" default="#0f3450">   So right at the start of the template, we’re off to the races defining variables. As you can see with the Gradient 1 and Gradient 2, these are both marked with a class of “mktoColor”.   As with the Elements, the full list of Variable types can be found here: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Create+a+Guided+Landing+Page+Template        class : "mktoString"      class : "mktoColor"      class : "mktoBoolean"   A string is a variable that contains a value, Color should be obvious what that does and Boolean is a yes or no choice.   In addition to the class, each variable has to have a unique ID. This is critical and used when the variable is called later on down the page. When you call a variable it’s always with the syntax of ${id name}. So in this case ${gradient1} and ${gradient2}. As you can see it looks a LOT like a token but it’s a token you can name whatever you want.   The mktoName is how it displays the variable in the Landing Page editor.   The default value is what it starts out with.   So let’s take a look and see how these Gradients are applied now that they’re defined at the top of the template.   Color is typically used in the CSS portion of the header. As defined in the previous document, CSS stands for “Cascading Style Sheets” and is a way of formatting the same thing over and over again, kind of like setting a font in a word processor.       /* Header Gradient */     #is {         top: 0;         width: 100%;         min-height: 620px;         position: relative;         z-index: 1;         color: #fff; padding-top: 10%;                 background-image: linear-gradient(${gradient1},${gradient2});     }   Now normally in CSS, the linear-gradient option would have two colors listed, the top color and the bottom color and it provides a gradual transition from one to the other.   We could just as easily change this in the template to        background-image: linear-gradient(red,white);   But the problem doing that is that an end user, who is only using the Landing Page Editor, would not be able to change it. The gradient would be defined in the template and inaccessible to the Editor.   Changing these values to the variables defined before allows the user to change the first and second colors in the Landing Page editor interface.   In Summary:   The Meta Tags define what the variables mean:     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient1" mktoName="Primary Gradient 1" default="#1da083">     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient2" mktoName="Primary Gradient 2" default="#0f3450">   The ID= is then used to call the variable and put it into action:       background-image: linear-gradient(${gradient1},${gradient2});   The other benefit to doing it this way is you can re-use the same variable over and over again. Look at this piece of CSS:   body {                 background: ${gradient2};         margin: 0;         color: #696E74;     }   That’s the same ID as the gradient we used before, only applied to a different section. This ensures that the bottom color of the gradient and the background of this section will always be the same color.   Any item in the CSS that contains a text value, a color value or a yes/no choice can be converted to a Variable.   Here’s another common usage:   You’re using a form on your landing page, but you want the end user to be able to change the text on the submit button.   As before you define the variable:        <meta class="mktoString" id="section4ButtonLabel" mktoName="Sec. 4 Button Label" default="More Questions?">   Then farther down the page where the button appears you call the variable you defined before:        <div class="centered mtb">           <a href="${section4ButtonLink}"><button class="btn btn-lg btn-green mt">           ${section4ButtonLabel}</button></a>      </div>   The <a href= is pulling a http link that the user can define in the editor, the button class is setting up a green button as defined in the CSS, and there is our Variable to display the label which reads “More Questions?” Here’s what it looks like in the editor:   So this is great, and it makes sense because you can see this was all set up and defined by a professional. What if you wanted to add your own? Is that even possible?   Naturally it is!   First, figure out what you want to convert to a Variable. Is it a piece of text like a button name or a link? Is it a color? Is it a yes/no choice?   Let’s say we want to add a variable that controls the color of the buttons. We have two, both using the same color green, and we want whoever is running the landing page editor to change that without having to go to the template:   Step 1: Define your variable:        <meta class="mktoColor" id="ButtonColor" mktoName="Button Color" default="#1DA083">   We’re talking about colors so the class will be “mktoColor”. The ID can be anything we want it to be as can be the mktoName. The default is the same lovely green shade as was used before.   Now we need to call this color.  Looking at the CSS, we can see the .btn-green is defined as this:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: #1da083;           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }   The background is the color we want to change to a Variable so it can be edited without having to access the template.   Change the code to this:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: ${ButtonColor};           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }     Approve the template and check out the landing page in the editor:     Well that’s fantastic, but there’s a separate color for the border, we could just as easily add a variable for it as well:        border: 4px solid #1da083;   We don’t want to HAVE to add another new variable for just the border. We could change the border at the same time as the button. By changing #1da083; to ${ButtonColor};   The trick now becomes what if you change your mind? What if you have a variable in the template that is no longer desired? How do you get rid of it?   Remember each variable is two pieces, the definition and the call. You have to remove BOTH pieces. Technically removing the call would be enough to prevent the change from being made on the page, but the definition is what makes the variable appear in the Landing Page Editor, if you only removed the call then there would be a non-functional Variable in the landing page editor.   So in the case of our button color:   Step 1 would be to strip out the meta tag containing the definition:     Step 2 would be changing the variable name where it’s being used to some fixed value:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: ${ButtonColor}; -> change this to some other fixed color. #00FF33; or the original #1da083;.           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }   Doing both pieces will prevent the Variable from being listed in the Landing Page Editor and prevent it from having any effect on the page.  
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  So you’ve now used the previous document (Getting Started With Guided Landing Pages:) to download a template from our library and set it up in your Marketo instance, you have even used it to make a landing page or two and you’ve customized those landing pages, all of which is fantastic news! Good job!   But now you’re looking at the template and things need to be changed:   That’s a good start, but the Elements on the page may not seem “right” to you. We have an image on the left, a text headline on the right and a form below the text headline.   What if that’s NOT the layout you intended? What if, instead, you wanted the headline at the top, centered on the page and the image and the form side by side below the headline?   All of the elements on the template can be added, removed, re-ordered, changed up, switched out and modified. Doing so, however, absolutely requires knowledge of HTML. As stated before, if you are not comfortable editing HTML and do not have a resource available to you, please reach out to services@marketo.com, they are able to assist with any sort of coding needs.   Editing a Template:   Let’s go back to the template we created before and edit it and see what we can do about that image, form and headline.   Every object on a Guided Template is called an “Element”, you can see a list of the elements being used on any given page in the right hand pane of the landing page editor. However, that’s not all the elements that can be used on a landing page.   The full list of template elements can be found here: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Create+a+Guided+Landing+Page+Template   So looking at that list, and knowing we want to change the layout of a text headline, image and form, the Elements we should be looking for are marked like this: class : "mktoText" class: "mktoImg" class : "mktoForm"   That seems easy enough, let’s look at the code and see what we can see.   Scrolling down through the code you will see first a bunch of variables defined. Variables are another sort of item that can be changed on a responsive landing page, please see Editing Marketo Guided Landing Page Templates, Pt. 2 - Variables:  which follows this one.   Following that is a bunch of CSS code. CSS stands for “Cascading Style Sheets” and is a way of formatting the same thing over and over again, kind of like setting a font in a word processor. You wouldn’t want to have to re-set your font and size every time you start a new paragraph, right? CSS helps maintain a consistent look and feel across the entire document.   Following the CSS, we get to the main section of the template, the <body> section. The <body> tag typically contains what you and I would consider to be “THE” web page. Everything above the body helps define how the web page looks and feels, but the <body> contains the actual content.   Sure enough, right there inside the <body> tag on lines 290 to 295 are the Elements we’re looking for:   Each of the Elements we want to re-order are located inside <div> tags. A <div> tag is just a way of separating out one part of the page from the rest of the page. This section is marked as being “special” and the “class=” attribute is telling us in what way this section is special.   Each section starts with <div and ends with </div> closing it off. In HTML it’s important to close elements that have been started, so if we’re going to change the order of things, it’s important to select the entire section, from the <div to the </div>   More on HTML <div> tags here: http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_div.asp   HTML renders everything from left to right and from top to bottom. In the code, we are first defining the mktoImage, following that with mktoText and finally with mktoForm. That’s why the objects appear on the landing page in that order:   In order to change the layout in a specific way, we will have to take each of the <div> tags containing elements and place them in a table. A table is a way in HTML to order things in terms of rows and columns. The <table> tag is one of the oldest tags in HTML and works on pretty much every HTML capable device.   More on the <table> tag here: http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_table.asp   Wrapping the Elements in a table is pretty straightforward. Copy the code to a text editor:        <div class="mktoImg col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered" id="primaryImage" mktoName="Primary Image" style="min-height:100%;" mktoImgClass="expandToFit"></div>      <div class="col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered"><div class="mktoText" id="primaryBodyHeader" mktoName="Primary Header"><h1>Alice's Adventures in Wonderland</h1></div></div>      <div class="mktoForm" id="primaryForm" mktoName="Primary Form" style="margin-bottom:40px;padding:10px;min-height:80px;"></div>   Step 1 is to change the order, we want the text to come first:        <div class="col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered"><div class="mktoText" id="primaryBodyHeader" mktoName="Primary Header"><h1>Alice's Adventures in Wonderland</h1></div></div>      <div class="mktoImg col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered" id="primaryImage" mktoName="Primary Image" style="min-height:100%;" mktoImgClass="expandToFit"></div>      <div class="mktoForm" id="primaryForm" mktoName="Primary Form" style="margin-bottom:40px;padding:10px;min-height:80px;"></div>   Step 2 is to wrap the content in a table. Inside the <table> tag are special tags that define the rows and columns. <tr> sets up each row and as you saw with the </div> tag is marked with a </tr> ending the row.   <td> defines each column, I know it’s confusing having <tr> where “r” clearly means “row”. You’d think it would be <tc> for column, but trust me, it’s <td>.   More on <tr> and <td> here: http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_tr.asp http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_td.asp   <table>      <tr>           <td>                <div class="col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered"><div class="mktoText" id="primaryBodyHeader" mktoName="Primary Header"><h1>Alice's Adventures in Wonderland</h1></div></div>           </td>      </tr>      <tr>           <td>                <div class="mktoImg col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered" id="primaryImage" mktoName="Primary Image" style="min-height:100%;" mktoImgClass="expandToFit"></div>           </td>           <td>                <div class="mktoForm" id="primaryForm" mktoName="Primary Form" style="margin-bottom:40px;padding:10px;min-height:80px;"></div>           </td>      </tr> </table>   This is the basic structure of the table. There are going to be some tweaks needed, but let’s see how this looks first. Put this in place of the code currently in the template like so:   The indented tabs here aren't JUST for readability. The Guided Template Editor has build in code validation and it will return errors if you try to have your elements on the same line as the TD's and TR's. Make sure each item is on it's own line.   Go back and re-approve the draft and then edit the landing page we made before.   It’s not pretty, but that’s OK. First we have to get the structure the way we want it, making it look pretty is the very last thing we do.   What we have here is the text headline on the top, which is great. The image and the form are below, left and right, respectively, side by side. That’s just what we wanted.   The problem is that we have a row with one column on top of a row with two columns and that has skewed things slightly. Fortunately this is an easy fix. We just need to take the single column in row 1 and make it stretch across both columns in row 2.   To do that, we add an attribute. Attributes modify the way tags behave.   In the template go back to the code we inserted and find the <table> tag where we set the whole thing up. First we’re going to control the width of the table:        <table width=”100%”>   This tells the browser to render the table at 100% the width of the screen.   Now find the <td> tag that contains the text element.             <td>                <div class="col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered"><div class="mktoText" id="primaryBodyHeader" mktoName="Primary Header"><h1>Alice's Adventures in Wonderland</h1></div></div>           </td>   Add the following attribute like so:             <td colspan=”2” width=”100%”>                <div class="centered"><div class="mktoText" id="primaryBodyHeader" mktoName="Primary Header"><h1>Alice's <br>Adventures in <br>Wonderland</h1></div></div>           </td>   So what we’ve told it here is to span two columns and take up 100% the width of the table, and since the table is already 100% the width of the screen, this should fit the page as well. We’ve also changed the class on the <div> so that it simply reads “centered”. This should center the title based on the CSS code defined above.   Now find the <td> tags that contain the image and the form and adjust them to 50% each like so:             <td width="50%">                <div class="mktoImg col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered" id="primaryImage" mktoName="Primary Image" style="min-height:100%;" mktoImgClass="expandToFit"></div>           </td>           <td width="50%">                 <div class="mktoForm" id="primaryForm" mktoName="Primary Form" style="margin-bottom:40px;padding:10px;min-height:80px;"></div>           </td>   Go back and approve the template change and edit a draft of your landing page. There you go! Now if we were preview this and change the size of the window, we get this (image and form are blank as they have not yet been added.)
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  Marketo now fully supports responsive landing pages, we call the new style a "Guided Landing Page". A Guided Landing Page is one that is capable of dynamically resizing itself for different window sizes and devices. If you’ve used the Marketo interface to set up an Email Template and an Email, the basic concept of setting up a responsive template and landing page will feel pretty familiar.   First you have to define a template that contains the editable areas of the landing page, once that is completed you use that template to build the landing page. Unlike the Email editor however, constructing and altering a responsive landing page template will require a minor amount of HTML knowledge.   If you are not comfortable in HTML and do not have an HTML developer available to assist you, Marketo’s services team can help! You can reach them at services@marketo.com   To get started, first visit our Template Library for Guided Landing Page Templates located here: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Guided+Landing+Page+Templates;jsessionid=5D71353C1CBF708DEC3DAB1588E78B4F     Select the template you’d like to use, right click the link and select “Save Link As” to download the HTML code.   Once the template is saved locally on your computer, go to where it’s saved and open it in the text editor of your choice. What you’ll see is a whole bunch of HTML:     In your text editor, use CTRL-A to select all and CTRL-C to copy it to the clip-board. (On a Mac this is Command-A and Command-C) then log on to your Marketo instance.   In your Marketo instance, go to the Design Studio and select “New Landing Page Template”     In the New Landing Page Template window, assign your template a folder and a name, then make sure the editing mode is “Guided”. The “Free-form” mode is for the non-responsive templates that we had before. Click “Create”!     Now we’re ready to replace the sample template code with the code you downloaded from the Template Library.   CTRL-A (Command-A on a Mac) will select the starter code and CTRL-V (Command-V) will paste the template code right over the top of the existing code. The template will save itself automatically when finished.     Now that the template is ready to go, we’re ready to see it in action!   Using a Marketo Guided Landing Page Template:   Now that we have a template created, we’re ready to start using it. Close the template tab where the code is and go back to the Design Studio.   Select the template you just created and approve it.     Once the template is approved, you can use it to create a landing page. In the new landing page window, assign a folder and a name and select the template you just created. Click “Create”!   You can always identify which templates are responsive and which are not by looking for a little window icon on the right hand side. If the window icon is present then that template was created using the new Guided editor and is fully responsive. If the window is not present, then that template was created using the old editor and it’s NOT responsive. You cannot automatically convert an old non-responsive template to a new one.   Congratulations! Your new responsive template is ready to use!   Please see our documentation here on how to edit a Guided Landing Page:   https://docs.marketo.com/pages/releaseview.action?pageId=7515306      
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    Marketo offers a number of ways to contact Marketo Support directly for assistance from our different support regions.   Support Portal (https://support.marketo.com)   The Marketo Support Portal features a web form submission to submit support cases to Marketo Support.  The form gives authorized support contacts the ability to provide details on the support issue that allows Marketo Support to efficiently and effectively assign your case to the best suited available support engineer.     Email to Case Submission   Authorized Support Contacts can email their cases to: support@marketo.com   Reminder: Cases submitted by email are all submitted with a P3 Priority   Regional Phone Contact Information   Marketo does feature the tried and true means of contact support, by the phone.  Authorized Support contacts can contact Marketo Support by calling one of the regional phone numbers listed below.   Region Contact Details Observed Holidays North America Hours: M-F, 6am to 6pm Pacific Toll Free US: +1.877.270.6586 Direct: +1.650.376.2303 New Year's Day Independence Day Thanksgiving Day and the Day After Christmas Day Europe, Middle East, Africa Hours: M-F, 8am to 5pm GMT Europe: +353 (0)1 242 3030 UK: 0800 151 3030   Languages Supported: English, French, German, Portuguese New Year's Day Easter Monday Christmas Day St. Stephen's Day Asia Pacific Hours: M-F, 9am to 6pm Aus EST ANZ: +61 2 9045 2701 New Year's Day ANZAC Day Australia Day Queen's Birthday Labour Day Christmas Day Easter Monday Boxing Day  
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  Overview Add Leads to Static Lists Use Custom Fields Overview Lead records have two primary components – lead attributes and activity logs. Lead attributes are the fields and field values within the lead record. For example, Job Title is a lead attribute. Lead Name is a lead attribute. Activity logs record the actions Marketo or the lead themselves have taken. For example, sending an email to a lead is an activity that would show in the activity log. If the lead opens the email or visits a tracked page, those activities would show in the activity log as well.   Activities in the activity log are only retained for 25 months, or 37 if you have purchased the premium data retention option. The main way to store activity data beyond the Data Retention Policy timeframe is to use the Bulk Extract API. There are two other ways you can keep a reference of these activities after the end of the Data Retention period, and they can be referenced within the Marketo UI. This article will show you how that can be done.     Add Leads to Static Lists Static lists will retain lead membership even if the activity of adding the lead to the list has been removed. This will let you have lists dedicated to specific criteria that would otherwise be removed after the data retention time period has been passed.   For example, Smart Campaign membership history is not retained after 25 months. If you are searching for members of a Smart Campaign, but a lead first became a member of the Smart Campaign more than 25 months ago, the search results would not include that lead.   An easy way to work around that is to add your leads to a static list as part of the flow of the campaign. When creating your Smart Campaign, create a new static list with the same corresponding name (makes it easier to identify later). When building the flow of your campaign, add the "Add to List" flow step so that all leads going through the campaign will be logged on the list.         Use Custom Fields Lead attributes and their field values are not affected by the Data Retention Policy. Use Smart Campaigns to populate custom fields with values based on activities your leads take. This will allow you to filter leads by these lead attributes that are not affected by the Data Retention Policy. A side benefit to this is that it is faster to search by lead attributes than by searching through lead activity logs.   Example: This approach can work for many different activities, but let’s use form fill outs as an example.   Let’s say you want to be able to identify leads who have been very active and have filled out more than 5 forms over their lifecycle. You could use the filter “Filled Out Form” with the “Min. Number of Times” constraint set to 5. However, if one of those forms filled out occurred more than 25 months ago, the filter would only be able to access 4 form fill activities in the activity log. Therefore, the lead would not pass the filter.   Instead of using the “Filled Out Form” filter, set up a Smart Campaign to write to custom fields that show you how many forms they’ve filled out, and when the first one was. Here’s how to do it:   1. Create two new custom fields in Marketo, one Score Field, and the second a Date Field.   2. Create a new Smart Campaign   3. Add the trigger “Fills Out Form” set to “is any” to the Campaign Smart List     4. Add these two Flow Steps to the Campaign Flow: Flow Step 1 : “Change Score” Score Field Name: your score field name Change: +1   Flow Step 2 : “Change Data Value” Add Choice to Flow Step Choice 1: If “your score field name”  “is empty” Attribute “your score field name” New Value: {{system.date}} Default Choice: Do Nothing       This campaign will listen for any time a lead fills out a form, add +1 to your score field, and if it’s the very first form they’ve ever filled out, it will log the date of when it was done. If the lead has ever filled out a form in the past, there will already be a date value in the date field, so the flow choice would just skip over it and do nothing.       Results You’ll See: With the original goal of identifying leads who have filled out more than 5 forms you’ll be able to filter for leads that have filled out at least 5 forms. In addition, this campaign will let you search for leads based on when they had filled out their very first form, regardless of how long ago it was. Since it’s stored in a lead field, it’s a lead attribute that is not affected by the Data Retention Policy at all.      
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NOTE: To secure your Marketo landing pages requires either Marketo SSL for Landing Pages (obsolete service) or Secured Domains for Landing Pages. Please contact your Marketo Customer Success Manager for more information or to purchase.   With Marketo’s Secured Page Services: SSL for Landing Pages, Marketo customers were responsible for providing the original SSL certificate and updated certificates upon expiration. If you have reached this page because you are providing an updated certificate, an upgrade is required.   What’s changing: Marketo has discontinued the Secured Page Services: SSL for Landing Pages service and its manual certificate renewal process. This is being replaced with the Marketo Secured Domains for Landing Pages product which provides all needed certificates and manages renewals automatically.   Action Required: Please contact your Marketo Customer Success Manager to add the the Secured Domains for Landing Pages product to your subscription.   Once you’ve purchased Secured Domains for Landing Pages for your instance:   OPEN A NEW SUPPORT CASE Marketo login required. Select Case Type - "Help me setup/create" Select Case Issue - "System Configuration" If you have multiple instances, please provide us with the Munchkin Code (Found in Admin > Munchkin) of the instance that is ready. Format ###-XXX-###.   Marketo will then have certificates generated to cover all the domains and subdomains that you’ve set up in your instance. Within 3-business days, we will create a secure server endpoint. Please plan accordingly for this 72-hour turn-around-time.   How is the new Secured Domains for Landing Pages Better? With Marketo’s new Secured Domains for Landing Pages product, you no longer have to provide renewal/updated certificates to Marketo. We’ll procure any necessary certificates and manage their renewals automatically – giving you a more secure and convenient solution for securing your pages! For more information, please see our Overview & FAQ: Secured Domains for Landing Pages.   Do I have to upgrade? An upgrade is required. Marketo no longer supports the legacy Secured Page Services: SSL for Landing Pages certificate renewal process.
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!!EASTER EGG!! The ball with the Marketo logo in the upper-left corner of the screen is your Superball.  Here's a quick trick to make it bounce like it did when you first got into your Marketo instance: Hold down Ctrl (Command for Macs) + Shift, then hit the 's' key. Happy bouncing!    
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NOTE: To secure your Marketo landing pages requires either Marketo SSL for Landing Pages (obsolete service) or Secured Domains for Landing Pages. Please contact your Marketo Customer Success Manager for more information or to purchase.   If you have already secured your Marketo landing pages with Secured Domains for Landing Pages and now need to add additional subdomains to be served securely, please follow the steps below: Step 1. Create your new subdomains (CNAMEs and Domain Aliases) Step 2. Submit a support case to secure your new subdomain STEP 3: Create New Landing Pages   Step 1. Create your new subdomains (CNAMEs and Domain Aliases) To secure a new subdomain, please create the CNAME(s) and domain alias(es) in your instance. For more information on this, please see: Add Additional Landing Page CNAMEs.   Step 2. Submit a support case to secure your new subdomain Once you’ve created the new subdomain (CNAME and domain alias), please click the link below to create a support case. OPEN A NEW SUPPORT CASE Marketo login required. Select Case Type - "Help me setup/create" Select Case Issue - "System Configuration" If you have multiple instances, please provide us with the Munchkin Code (Found in Admin > Munchkin) of the instance that is ready. Format ###-XXX-###.   Marketo will have any additional certificate(s) generated and loaded to cover the new subdomain(s). This step may take up to 3-business days. Marketo will contact you when this step has been completed.   STEP 3: Create New Landing Pages Once you receive confirmation that the subdomain has been added, you can now create new HTTPS landing pages. Please be sure all images, JavaScript files and other external links in your landing pages are HTTPS. If you previously created landing pages, please review each of these and update all references to HTTPS. Please contact Marketo Support with any issues you may encounter.   If you purchased the SSL for Landing Pages service, you may need to upgrade to Secured Domains for Landing Pages, our new solution to secure landing pages.  Please contact your Marketo Customer Success Manager to add Secured Domains for Landing Pages to you subscription. Please note, with this upgrade, Marketo will provide the required certificate(s) and manage their ongoing approval.
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Issue: When selecting multiple values in a string field, it only shows 300 entries in the 'Select...' window. NOTE: This is expected behavior, we have limited the number of records to show to 300.   Workaround: If there is a value that is not in the 'Selected Values' window, you will need to start typing in the 'Select...'field so the autosuggest will start to filter the values, whatever value that is not already selected in the 'Selected Values'window, will show up in the 'Select...' window.
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Issue User Receives Communication Failure Error / bandaid when creating a new Email from a custom Template due to unapproved snippet. Resolution Email templates can contain code to reference a snippet by ID: <div class="mktoSnippet" id="FooterText" mktoName="Footer Text" mktoDefaultSnippetId="3"></div> If the snippet is not approved then a new email asset cannot be created, and instead a bandaid error occurs.   The snippet should be approved first before the template is used.    If the ID of the snippet in the HTML is 3 and the pod sj27, the URL to the asset would be Login | Marketo
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Issue: When building 'Program Membership Analysis' reports in RCE, the Program Status is not sorted according to the step values in the Program Channel. For example in the below screenshot: The value of the steps are clearly showing the progression of statuses from start to finish.   However when building a 'Program Membership Analysis' report, it is showing that the order of the status is not correct. 'New Member (Influenced)' should be appearing after 'Subscribed by Form - Non Member.'   Troubleshooting: Make sure that you do not have any other Programs Channels with the same Status, as this will cause issues. There is a deduplication that occurs in the backend which causes an issue when a 'Program Membership Analysis' report is created, if there is more than one Program Channel that has the same Program Status it will deduplicate and the one displayed might be due to the lower step.   Another issue that might happen also due to having more than one occurance of Program Status in other Program Channels is that other Program Statuses might appear in the report due to this.   Resolution: We currently do not support having more than one Program Status appear in the Program Channels, each Program Status has to be unqiue or issues with displaying Program Statuses will appear.
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Following the Q2 Spring Quarterly Release, we identified that that two new permissions had been enabled by default for all API users. Any role that had "Access API" checked in the permissions for the role had "Read-Only Named Account List" and "Read-Write Named Account List" added to their permissions.   With the upcoming minor release, we will be reverting the defaults for these permissions back to disabled.  After the rollback, some customers may receive an API error 603 when making API calls.  Customers who receive these errors can resolve them by re-enabling the new permissions.   To manage role permissions, go to Admin > Users & Roles > Roles. Re-Enable (check) and save the two permissions shown below:           If you continue to receive 603 errors after enabling these permissions, please contact Marketo Support for further assistance.
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Ready to SSL-secure your Marketo landing pages? Whether you’re securing your pages for the first time, adding additional CNAMEs to your already secured instance, or renewing your SSL certificate, you’re in the right place!   NOTE: To secure your Marketo landing pages requires either Marketo SSL for Landing Pages (obsolete service) or Secured Domains for Landing Pages. Please contact your Marketo Customer Success Manager for more information or to purchase.   To get started, please choose one of the options below:   Setting Up Secured Domains for Marketo Landing Pages - FIRST TIME SETUP Setting Up Secured Domains for Marketo Landing Pages - ADDING NEW SUBDOMAIN Setting Up Secured Domains for Marketo Landing Pages - RENEWING SSL CERTIFICATES        
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What’s changing? Previously, customers could choose whether they wanted to secure their pages and tracking links via SSL. The responsibility of procuring, maintaining, renewing, and securely sending the certificates to Marketo lie entirely with the customer – Marketo just hosted them. In 2017, Chrome and Firefox announced they would begin marking any unsecured pages with clear ‘NOT SECURE’ warnings in their 2018 releases to encourage the use of SSL, and even distrusted certificates from certain providers. This essentially designated the certificate as a foundational security necessity to prevent customers fleeing from unsecured sites.   This change reinforced the increasing need for companies to protect their data and mitigate against online security threats. Recent studies have shown that ~45% of organizations are targets of Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks, typically lasting a few hours, and potentially costing companies not only lost revenue, but also customer data and overall trust. [1]   Simply put, an SSL certificate just isn't enough anymore, which is why Marketo updated how we manage SSL certificates and the overall security of our customers' landing pages with the introduction of Secured Domains, a comprehensive managed service, in early 2018.   How is Secured Domains different than an SSL certificate? In contrast to our previous solution, Secured Domains is less focused on the SSL certificate itself, and rather the security and performance benefits gained from our partnership with CloudFlare, an industry leader in secure solutions. Secured Domains not only includes the necessary SSL certificates, but, more importantly, provides robust security protection thanks to the investment made to secure our servers, which host Marketo landing pages, behind CloudFlare’s trusted security infrastructure.   With CloudFlare’s enterprise-grade tools securing our servers, we protect against security vulnerabilities and attacks on your Marketo pages.   Managed Web Application Firewall (WAF): keeps your pages secure by filtering and deflecting malicious attacks DDoS Protection:  keeps your pages live by absorbing attacks and preventing the pages (and Marketo's infrastructure) from crashing Content Delivery Network (CDN): a load balancer to distribute page views based on geolocation, which allows landing pages to load more quickly   Secured Domains also shifts the ownership of SSL certificates onto Marketo, which eliminates the hassle of managing them from Marketing & IT teams and, because they renew automatically, you no longer need to worry about your landing pages crashing due to an expired certificate. The certificates are provisioned by CloudFlare at an enterprise-level offering. For more information, please see our Overview & FAQ: Secured Domains for Landing Pages.   How do I learn more about Secured Domains? If you’re an existing customer, please contact your Marketo Customer Success Manager to add Secured Domains to your subscription. If you are unsure how to get in touch with your Customer Success Manager, please contact CustomerCare@marketo.com .   If you’re considering Marketo for your marketing automation solution and would like more information on Secured Domains and how it can improve your site security and performance, please contact GRP-Marketo-Sales@adobe.com.     Note Due to the security and risk mitigation enhancements we've made to protect Marketo servers, all SSL certificates are now uploaded to CloudFlare. While Marketo customers are not required to use the CloudFlare certificate included in Secured Domains, you will need to add Secured Domains to your instance to host any certificate on a Marketo landing page. Secured Domains is currently not included in the cost of Marketo so our customers who host their own landing pages and content may opt-out of the managed service.   [1] Tim Matthews, Imperva, DDoS Impact Survey Reveals the Actual Cost of DDoS Attacks, 12 Nov. 2014
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Issue:   You create Marketo campaigns but they are not showing up in Sales Insight in Salesforce. The steps below illustrates all the steps that are required to make these campaigns show in Sales Insight.     Resolution:   1. Make sure the trigger campaign in Marketo that you want to access through Sales Insight is using the "Campaign is Requested" trigger with a source of "Sales Insight"   2. Activate the campaign you created in Step 1 above from the "Schedule" tab of your campaign. This is very important. If the campaign not activated, it will never show up in Sales Insight.  
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At Marketo it is a violation of our Email Use Policy to send cold emails to purchased email addresses. Electronic Communications and Anti-Spam Policy Customer will comply with all laws and regulations applicable to bulk or commercial email, as well as other electronic communications, when using the Services, including without limitation all local or national laws applicable to the regions where Customer has business operations or where the recipients of their electronic communications are located. Marketo has a zero tolerance policy regarding using the Services to send Unsolicited Commercial Email ("UCE") or Unsolicited Bulk Email (“UBE”) (collectively referred to as “spam” or “Unsolicited Email”). Unsolicited Email is defined as email sent to persons other than  persons with whom Customer has an existing business relationship, OR (ii) persons who have consented to the receipt of such email, including publishing or providing their email address in a manner from which consent to receive email of the type transmitted may be reasonably implied. Commercial advertising and/or emails and other electronic communications may only be sent to recipients who have opted-in to receive messages from the sender. It is Marketo's policy to catalog, investigate and take appropriate action on all reports of abuse. Any Customer account found to be in violation of this policy is subject to immediate suspension, and may not be allowed to send any additional emails or other electronic communications using the Services. Recipients of emails or other electronic communications sent using the Services are encouraged to report suspected violation of this policy by forwarding a copy of the received email or other electronic communication to abuse@marketo.com. The full text of the policy is here: Marketo Use Policy – Marketo.com Is there ever an acceptable use for purchased data?  Yes. The Marketo Compliance Team supports the following uses for purchased data: Generate personalized URLs and send to purchased leads by postal mail Use purchased data to fill in additional details about leads who only provide an email address at the time of opt in - this makes for great targeting! When operating in a small market of known leads, purchased data can be useful for research purposes to track information about your target market Purchased leads can be contacted by phone to obtain email permission   The global anti-spam community does not consider permission to be transferable, except in the following circumstances: A company is wholly acquired by a new parent company; emails sent will include the same content from new owners A division of a company - product or brand - is acquired by a new parent company; emails sent will include the same content from new owners   Both parts of the above are key. Personal data alone may not be transferred with permission intact because permission is contextual. Even in the case of an acquisition additional permission is required if the emails will include significantly different content. To provide an illustration, when "Acme" acquired a home video camera company they acquired permission to continue to email the company's leads about selling home video cameras. That does not mean they have permission to email those people about every other product in "Acme's" portfolio. Email permission was granted to receive emails about home video products, not anything else. "Acme" could email those people and ask them to opt in to their other mailing lists, but acquiring a company does not give the new parent company the right to add the child company's opted-in leads to all their other unrelated mailing lists. Data vendors may say the leads they sell are "opted-in," but this is not true according to the standards set forth by the global antispam community.  Even if these individuals genuinely wished for the data vendor to sell their email addresses (often demonstrably untrue), they still would not have provided direct permission to the buyer to send them email. Marketo requires that permission be direct to the sender (or that there is an existing business relationship) to send email within our Terms. Many data companies offer list rental services where the data company sends an initial message, and passes on only the information of recipients who respond to the offer.   Marketo is not the only vendor in the marketplace with this philosophy against purchased lists, it is a widely know issue that purchased lists drive delivery issues. Purchased Lists and ESPs - Word to the Wise
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