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What is the Golden Shield Project? The Golden Shield Project, commonly referred to as "The Great Firewall of China", is an initiative by the Chinese government designed to monitor and heavily censor all internet content. While most firewalls offer a protective shield around a corporation, Golden Shield places one around an entire country. Years in the making, the Golden Shield began operation in 2006.   How does it affect me? If you are sending email to China, it will be subjected to significantly stricter email filtering than any other country in the world. This could result in email delays, delivered emails with unclickable links, or flat-out non-deliverability.   What can I do to ensure email delivery? While there is no guaranteed way to ensure delivery (to anyone for that matter), there are some best practices you can follow that can improve deliverability when sending to China. Avoid commonly filtered content: Political and religious content aren’t only hot-button topics at dinner, they can also earn your email a one-way ticket to the spam folder. You should also refrain from using generic salutations, such as “Dear Friend.” In fact, don’t use the word “Dear” in your greeting at all. You should however consider using a first name token to personalize the greeting. Proper language: If you’re not fluent in Chinese, avoid using free online translation software. Incorrect or mangled grammar can result in your email getting discarded (note: this practice is applicable to all foreign languages). Pay the money for a good translation service. Be sure to use simplified Chinese characters as opposed to traditional. Mind your links: Marketo adds click-tracking to all links, allowing you to track the recipient’s actions. Due to the stringent filters in China, you’ll have better odds of links even working if you disable click-tracking (even when click-tracked links do work, their numbers are often inflated due to the extreme filtering practices). Additionally, if you ever have the option to purchase the top-level domain for China, (.cn), do it. The URL www.mysite.cn will have a better chance of loading than www.mysite.com. Font size: In terms of deliverability, font size matters. Anything below a 10-point font can be misconstrued as an attempt to sneak something in, thereby exposing the content to additional filtering. Keep a clean list: China is known for its high attrition rates when it comes to email lists. If an email address does not interact (open or click) with an email after 2-3 sends, it may be abandoned. Continuing to mail to this type of email address can have an adverse effect on your sending reputation, and subject you to further filtering. Contact Marketo for large qq.com sends: If you plan on mailing to a list north of 25k to qq.com, please contact Marketo Support so they can create a whitelisting request for our Privacy Team.  Sending from a dedicated IP is required for this request.   How do I check if I am blacklisted in China? There are multiple sites that can give you this information. One we sometimes use is: http://www.blockedinchina.net/ . Be sure to check domains and sub-domains (if you use them).   What can I do to get off the blacklist? Nothing at all, unfortunately.  Listing are often dynamic and will resolve on their own when reputation improves or the content is not flagged.   Since I can’t do anything to be removed from the blacklist, what can I do to avoid landing on it going forward? Being blacklisted is only temporary 99% of the time (length of blacklisting will vary). Our best advice is to follow the above best practice tips.   Is there anything else I should know? Countries such as China and Japan are huge players in the mobile market, so be sure to keep mobile best practices in mind when designing emails. Marketo cares about your success. To stay on top of trends, we monitor and receive reports from CASA (Chinese Anti-Spam Alliance). If you have any additional questions, or if you feel that you're being impacted by the Golden Shield, please contact Marketo Support.
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  What’s changing? Previously, customers could choose whether they wanted to secure their pages and tracking links via SSL. The responsibility of procuring, maintaining, renewing, and securely sending the certificates to Marketo lie entirely with the customer – Marketo just hosted them. In 2017, Chrome and Firefox announced they would begin flagging any unsecured pages with clear ‘NOT SECURE’ warnings in their 2018 releases to encourage the use of SSL, and even distrusted certificates from certain providers. This essentially designated the certificate as a foundational security necessity to prevent customers fleeing from unsecured sites.   This change reinforced the increasing need for companies to protect their data and mitigate against online security threats. Recent studies have shown that ~45% of organizations are targets of Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks, typically lasting a few hours, and potentially costing companies not only lost revenue, but also customer data and overall trust. [1]   Simply put, an SSL certificate just isn't enough anymore, which is why Marketo updated how we manage SSL certificates and the overall security of our customers' landing pages with the introduction of Secured Domains, a comprehensive managed service, in early 2018.   How is Secured Domains different than an SSL certificate? In contrast to our previous solution, Secured Domains is less focused on the SSL certificate itself, and rather the security and performance benefits gained from our partnership with Cloudflare, an industry leader in secure solutions. Secured Domains not only includes the necessary SSL certificates, but, more importantly, provides robust security protection thanks to the investment made to secure our servers, which host Marketo landing pages, behind Cloudflare’s trusted security infrastructure.   With Cloudflare’s enterprise-grade tools securing our servers, we protect against security vulnerabilities and attacks on your Marketo pages. Once Secured Domains is implemented for your instance, your domains will be protected via the following:   Managed Web Application Firewall (WAF): keeps your pages secure by filtering and deflecting malicious attacks DDoS Protection:  keeps your pages live by absorbing attacks and preventing the pages (and Marketo's infrastructure) from crashing Content Delivery Network (CDN): a load balancer to distribute page views based on geolocation, which allows landing pages to load more quickly   Secured Domains also shifts the ownership of SSL certificates onto Marketo, which eliminates the hassle of Marketing & IT teams having to manage them and, because they renew automatically, you no longer need to worry about your landing pages crashing due to an expired certificate. The certificates are provisioned by Cloudflare and authored by DigiCert at an enterprise-level offering. For more information, please see our Overview & FAQ: Secured Domains for Landing Pages.   How do I learn more about Secured Domains? If you’re an existing customer, please contact your Marketo Customer Success Manager to add Secured Domains to your subscription. As of September 2019, a base Secured Domains package, which secures your first landing page domain and first tracking link domain, is now included automatically upon your next Marketo renewal. If you are unsure how to get in touch with your Customer Success Manager, please contact CustomerCare@marketo.com .   If you’re considering Marketo for your marketing automation solution and would like more information on Secured Domains and how it can improve your site security and performance, please contact GRP-Marketo-Sales@adobe.com.     Note Due to the security and risk mitigation enhancements we've made to protect Marketo servers, all customer domains are now hosted on Cloudflare. Marketo customers will be required to use the auto-renewing SSL certificate included with Secured Domains unless an exception is granted (more information on exceptions can be found in the FAQ). If you use more than the 1 landing page domain and 1 tracking link domain covered under the base offering, additional domains may simply be added on a la carte - talk to your CSM or Sales contact for pricing details.   [1] Tim Matthews, Imperva, DDoS Impact Survey Reveals the Actual Cost of DDoS Attacks, 12 Nov. 2014  
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Issue Several types of fields in Marketo have requirements for the type of data that can be stored, as well as the limit to how much data can be contained in that field type. The Custom Field Type Glossary can tell you what fields are available, and this article will show you details on the type and maximum limits for those fields.    Field Types & Limits Boolean Can only be set to “true” or “false” (stored in the database as 1 or 0).   Currency Maximum value of 9223370000000000000.  Will be displayed with the currency set in your instance under Admin -> Location.   Date Must be formatted “MM/DD/YYYY”.   Datetime Must be formatted “MM/DD/YYYY HH:MM:SS”.   Email Must be a properly formatted email (user@example.com).   Float Can include decimals up to the hundredths place.  The value will round to the nearest hundredth (eg. 99.999 rounds to 100, 99.985 rounds to 99.99).  Maximum value of 10000000000.   Formula See this guide: Create and Use a Concatenated String (Formula) Field    Integer Values are limited to between -2147483647 to 2147483647.   Percent Must be a full number without decimals.  Maximum value of 9223370000000000000.   Phone Can have letters, numbers, or characters.  Maximum of 2,000 characters.   Score Maximum score of 9223372036854775807.  If the score is increased higher than that, the score will reset to -9223372036854775808.   String Can contain letters, numbers and special characters.  Limit of 255 total characters   Text Area  Can contain letters, numbers and special characters.   Limit of 65,535 total characters   URL "http://"  will automatically be appended to the value if the value doesn't have that prefix or "https://" already.  Does not have to be formatted any further (Generic top-level domain not required).
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Every link you include in your emails will have tracking code automatically appended when sent. Marketo adds a generic domain to the tracking code, for brand consistency and improved delivery rates we recommend that you brand your tracking links. Here is how: Admin rights required.   Choose a CNAME You likely already have a landing page CNAME such as info.yourdomain.com, you can pick another subdomain for your branded tracking links CNAME.Examples to choose from: go.yourdomain.com get.yourdomain.com pages.yourdomain.com The branded tracking CNAME must be different than your landing page CNAME.   Gather Information Now that you have decided on a branded tracking CNAME you need find the current one being used. Go to Admin then Email and copy the current tracking domain.   Contact IT Ask your IT to create a CNAME that redirects the CNAME you chose earlier to the current domain you copied in the previous step:   go.yourdomain.com > mkto-qe0877.com   These values will be unique to your instance, do not copy paste items from this article, find them in your instance.         Configure Marketo 1. Once your IT has completed the creation of the CNAME, go back to Admin then Email and enter your branded tracking CNAME and Branding Domain   2. Click Save Changes. T That's it! Make sure to send yourself an email that has a link in it from Marketo and test the link to ensure that the branded tracking link CNAME is working properly.   NOTE: If you'd like more information about branding domains, like how to set up multiple ones, delete others or reset a default, check out the documentation here: Add Multiple Branding Domains - Marketo Docs - Product Docs
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Here are some details about how Marketo emails are sent and tracked. Before sending your email Marketo makes a couple of additions to your email before sending it: Replace all the email tokens (ex. "{{First Name}}") with their database or default values Wrap all links with Marketo tracking information Add an invisible image to track opens   With those changes complete, Marketo will attempt to deliver your email to the recipient. Email sends and deliver events Once the email is sent from Marketo's servers, a Send Email event is added to the lead's activity log. If the mail was successfully delivered, Marketo logs an Email Delivered event. Email bounces Sometimes an email can't be delivered. Marketo will place these email bounces into two categories: Soft bounce Sometimes an email isn't deliverable immediately, but might be okay later - for example, if a recipient's mailbox is full. This is a soft bounce and is logged as an Email Bounced Soft event. Marketo attempts to deliver the message up to 3 times, trying each Mail Exchange (MX) server. With each attempt, the timeout value is increased. Hard bounce Sometimes an email cannot be delivered no matter what, for example. the email address is incorrect.  This is a hard bounce and is logged as an Email Bounced event.  Marketo sets the lead's Email Invalid field to true so that the lead will not be emailed again.  The Email Invalid Cause is populated with a reason returned by the mail server. Email blocked Emails may be blocked for a number of reasons, including, spam complaints, blacklisting, or because some aspect of the email content has triggered a spam filter.  When an email is blocked it is logged as an Email Hard Bounced event. Marketo sets the lead's Email Suspended flag for 24 hours during which they cannot receive email. When an email is marked as spam Sometimes leads will mark your emails as spam or junk mail.  When that happens, Marketo is notified of this event by the lead's email provider, and Marketo will automatically unsubscribe the lead from the emails by setting the Unsubscribed flag to true. Email opens When a recipient views an email, their email client retrieves the invisible image from Marketo's servers.  This triggers an Open Email event, no matter how long or short the view was.  An Open Email event also occurs when a lead clicks the "View as web page" link in an email. Only one email open event is tracked regardless of the number of times a lead views the email.  This happens because email clients make the open event unreliable.  For example, a lead could open the email multiple times just by browsing through their inbox via the preview pane reading the entire message content without clicking/opening the actual email, or the lead's email browser may block images which prevents Marketo from tracking the open events. Due to Marketo's distributed architecture, email open events may be delayed a couple of minutes between when the event occurs and when they appear in the lead's activity log. Email link clicks The links in an email are wrapped by Marketo with special tracking code.  When a recipient clicks on one of those links, the Marketo servers are informed about the click, and a Click Email event is logged to the recipient's activity log. A person who clicks one of these links also gets cookied by Marketo; this makes them a known lead and causes subsequent web activity (on Munchkin-enabled pages) to appear in their activity log. "View as Web Page" events When the "View as web page" option is used for email, the views and clicks on those pages work just like views and clicks on the actual email in the lead's inbox.  For example, any click on a link on the email web page registers in the lead's activity log just like the lead clicked it in an email client.    
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Issue Description Link(s) placed into Email(s) by a Token is not tracked and does not show successful click activity in the lead/person record. Issue Resolution Sometimes there are situations in which URLs, and other content, are placed in emails by using {{tokens}}. When Marketo sends emails, you can think of building the email in 2 steps: Marketo searches the email code for "http" or "https" and wraps the tracking code around the URL Marketo inserts the values of {{tokens}} into the email. If the {{token}} value is http://www.domain.com , that would be expected to not track because of the above 2 steps. After the {{token}} value is inserted, Marketo does not go back to wrap tracking code around http/https. The {{token}} doesn't look like a URL when the system applies the tracking code because the tokens don't pull the values in until the next step after. The solution to tracking tokens is to place http:// or https:// on the outside of the token, like such: http:// {{token}} That way, when Marketo builds the email, in step #1, the system recognizes the http and knows it's a URL. Then the tracking is wrapped around the http and the {{token}} as well. Then in step #2, the {{token}} value is inserted into an already-wrapped link. A unique caveat to keep in mind is that if the {{token}} value contains http, but http is on the outside of the {{token}}. Let's say the URL you want to insert is http://www.domain.com . You have to move the http:// out in front of the {{token}}, but you don't want to also have it inside the {{token}} as well. If your link ends up being http://http://www.domain.com it will break. To get around this, you'll need to remember to take the http:// out of the {{token}} value. {{http://www.domain.com}} would instead be http://{{www.domain.com}}
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Issue You see a record in the database has something similar to the following Email Suspended Cause: "554- Your access to this mail system has been rejected due to the sending MTA's poor reputation. If you believe that this failure is in error, please contact the intended recipient via alternate means." Solution The 554 error is generated by a hard bounce due to a spam block. It is possible that one of the sending IP addresses used may have been on a temporary blacklist the day of the attempted send. This happens while using shared IPs when another Marketo instance using the same IP hits a spam trap, putting the IP on a blacklist for 24 hours. This error can also happen to users on a dedicated IP if they hit a spam trap with one of their email sends.        
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  A blocklist is a database that uses certain pieces of information to determine if an IP or domain is sending messages that could be considered spam. There are hundreds of blocklists out there, though only a handful of them are used widely enough to have a major impact on your email delivery rates.   Blocklists are tools that are used by ISPs to inform decisions on whether or not to place a message in the end user’s inbox. If an IP or domain is on a blocklist, ISPs that use that blocklist to inform inbox decisions will not accept mail from that IP. Most blocklists are dynamic, meaning that they will delist automatically after a given period of time or when the sender’s email statistics improve. An IP will be included on a blocklist if certain criteria are met, and these criteria vary. Spamhaus, the world’s most well repudiated and widely used blocklist, has a great graphic that explains how their blocklist feeds information to ISPs and what happens from there.   While blocklists use a number of methods to determine whether or not an IP is sending messages that could be considered spam, two of the most common are spamtraps addresses and user feedback. Spamtraps are email addresses that are not meant to receive email. Some spamtraps were created by anti-spam professionals and were never meant to receive email, while others are simply old invalid addresses that have been repurposed. You can read more about spam traps here: What Is a Spamtrap and Why Do They Matter?. Blocklists also rely heavily on feedback from users that tell them that a particular IP or sender is sending spam.   We have to be strict about our Email Use and Anti-Spam Policy because in the rare event that one of our customers triggers a blocklist, any customer on the same IP range will be affected.   To check if an IP is blocklisted, use this tool.   If you have found that you are listed on a blocklist, please see this article, Blocklist Remediation, for a path to resolution.   To learn more about specific blacklists, please visit our guide to the top blacklists, Top Blocklists – What You Need to Know.   Blocklist FAQ  
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Issue You need to locate the Munchkin ID for a specific Marketo instance. Solution What is a Munchkin ID? Marketo's custom JavaScript tracking code, called Munchkin, tracks all individuals who visit your website so you can react to their visits with automated marketing campaigns. Even anonymous visitors are tracked along with their IP addresses and other information. The Munchkin ID is the unique identifier for a specific Marketo instance and insures tracked activity goes to the correct instance. How to find your Munchkin ID 1. Log into the specific Marketo Instance you need the Munchkin ID for. You can verify the instance name by checking the listing in the top left of your browser.   2. Go to Admin and click Munchkin in the tree on the left in the Integration section.     3. The Munchkin Account ID will be the first thing listed in the Tracking Code box.  
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For those in highly regulated industries, your company may additionally require that you securely encrypt the Marketo tracking links embedded in Marketo emails. Remember that Marketo takes the URLs you place inside of emails and shortens them using the "Branded Tracking Link" domain (this is another CNAME you set up in Marketo under Admin--> Email). These tracking links are how Marketo enables you to track engagement with your emails. Overview & FAQ - Overview & FAQ: Secured Domains for Tracking Links What's Changing Marketo has discontinued the Secured Page Services: SSL for Tracking Links service and its manual certificate renewal process. This is being replaced with the Marketo Secured Domains for Tracking Links product which provides all needed certificates and manages renewals automatically. Action Required To secure your email tracking links, contact your Marketo Customer Success Manager to add the Secured Domains for Tracking Links product to your subscription. Once you’ve purchased Secured Domains for Tracking Links for your instance: An automated message will be sent to the Support Admin on your account They will need to respond to the message with the Munchkin ID of the instance needing Tracking Links set up. Responding to this case will auto generate a Support Case for a Marketo technical support engineer to help complete the process. Marketo will then have certificates generated to cover all the domains and subdomains that you’ve set up in your instance. Within 3-business days, we will create a secure server endpoint. Please plan accordingly for this 72-hour turn-around-time. Do I need Secured Domains for Tracking Links? Secured Domains for Tracking Links ensure that tracking links can be served securely for domains which have implemented HSTS (HTTP Strict Transport Security). HSTS is a web server directive which forces all subsequent requests for resources on that domain to be loaded through HTTPS. If you have implemented HSTS at your site on any domain that you are choosing for either your Landing Page CNAME or your branded email tracking links domain, you will need Secured Domains for Tracking Links and/or Secured Domains for Landing Pages. How is the new Secured Domains for Tracking Links Better? With Marketo’s new Secured Domains for Tracking Links product, you no longer have to provide renewal/updated certificates to Marketo. We’ll procure any necessary certificates and manage their renewals automatically – giving you a more secure and convenient solution for securing your links in emails! Do I have to upgrade? An upgrade is required. Marketo no longer supports the legacy Secured Page Services: SSL for Tracking Links certificate renewal process. Will my tracking links automatically convert to HTTPS? You will not see tracking links in your Marketo emails changed to HTTPS (they will remain prefixed HTTP). However, when an end user clicks the link, if HSTS is enabled for the domain in the link being clicked and the browser is aware, the request will be automatically changed to HTTPS by the browser and served securely via HTTPS before re-directing to the destination of the link.   This means that no insecure connection occurs because the browser recognizes the HSTS security policy.  HSTS preload is required for this to work.   If a tracking link top level domain is not on the HSTS preload list, then link clicks will be insecure until the browser becomes aware of the HSTS policy on the target domain by visiting the site. Will my old links in emails continue to work? Links in emails will continue to function normally. Is this article helpful ? YesNo
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The Form Library lets you style your forms with an up-to-date look and feel just by dragging and dropping the CSS into your Marketo landing pages or template.  As a side note, the Form Library ONLY styles input, textarea, and select (drop-downs) fields and NOT your radio buttons or check-box selections.     Here's how it works: 1. Choose a form from the table below by clicking on the image. 2. Download the zipped file to your desktop. 3. Open the file and upload the provided images into your Marketo image library. 4. Open the provided code and replace "mktoWeb" with your directory name.   Example:   <style> .mktInput input, .mktInput select, .mktInput textarea  { background: url(rs/ mktoWeb /images/input_bg.png) repeat-x scroll 0 0; border: 1px solid #D4D2D2 !important; font-size:20px; padding: 8px 10px; cursor:pointer; }   .mktInput input:focus, .mktInput select:focus, .mktInput textarea:focus  { background: url(rs/ mktoWeb /images/input_bgHover.png) repeat-x scroll 0 0; } </style>   5. Copy the code and paste in on your landing page by  choosing the Custom HTML option within the design studio.   Note: Some forms use CSS3 for styling. The style is supported in all major browsers except Internet Explorer. You will need to be using IE9 or higher for any form using CSS3. Is this article helpful ? YesNo Download code for this form Download code for this form Download code for this form Download code for this form Download code for this form Download code for this form Download code for this form Download code for this form Download code for this form Download code for this form Download code for this form Download code for this form
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Quick points: *Spamtraps are addresses owned by antispam organizations *Emailing a spamtrap (usually) gets your IP or domain blacklisted *Maintain current, direct opt-in with an active lead database to avoid this Is this article helpful ? YesNo What is a spam trap or spamtrap?   A spam trap, or spamtrap is an email address secretly owned by an antispam organization that is used to detect spam. Antispam organizations do not sign up for mailing lists, so they consider any email sent to these addresses to be spam. Once email is sent to the spamtrap, the antispam organization that owns this address will blacklist the IP that sent the email (or, less often, domains that are linked in the message).   Email administrators purchase subscriptions to various blacklists, and use the lists to block all incoming email from listed IPs or containing listed domains. From the marketer’s perspective, this can mean a high number of bounced emails leading to low lead engagement, and ultimately to weak revenue performance.   There are two types of spamtraps – pristine traps, and repurposed/recycled traps. A pristine trap is an email address that was never used by a person. A repurposed trap is an email address that once belonged to someone but is no longer a valid address; these addresses will bounce as bad addresses for at least six months before an antispam organization will turn them into live traps.   How can a spamtrap get into my Marketo lead database?   Purchased data   Purchased data is unreliable. The antispam world does not like the use of purchased data so antispam administrators have made a concerted effort to get spamtrap addresses into the databases of data vendors. While data vendors may say they provide opt-in data in reality consent should be direct to your company. Sending unsolicited email is prohibited by the Marketo Terms of Use because this practice has a high risk of causing blacklist issues that can destroy deliverability for multiple Marketo customers. To avoid spam traps get direct opt-in before sending email. If you have purchased data in the past we recommend setting any inactive purchased leads to marketing suspended or simply removing them from your database. Old data Repurposed traps are email addresses that were once valid but are now owned by an antispam organization. This can happen when a company goes out of business; expired domains are often purchased by antispam organizations. Sometimes a company that has a direct partnership with an antispam organization will allow email addresses of former employees or users to become spamtraps. Because antispam organizations will generally make sure future spam traps return a bounce as bad addresses for at least six months before they become spam traps you can prevent repurposed traps in your database by emailing remaining engaged with everyone in your database at least once every six months. Avoid “wake the dead” campaigns to addresses you have not contacted in more than six months. Unconfirmed form entries People can unintentionally enter spamtrap addresses into forms either by making a typo or by intentionally using a fake email address that happens to be a spamtrap. If you use single opt-in, you may add spamtraps to your mailing list. This is more likely to happen if you are a B2C company or if someone thinks they can get whitepapers or free trials simply by filling out a form with made-up information.   How can I identify spamtrap addresses?   Spamtrap addresses are considered trade secrets by the antispam organizations. They do not share these addresses because their goal is for senders to change their mailing practices rather than to simply remove spamtraps from their mailing lists.   That said, one thing we do know about spamtraps is that they tend to be automated processes and do not engage. Spamtraps do not click links. You can use smart list filters to identify inactive leads in Marketo.   How can I prevent spamtraps in my database? Maintain active, direct opt-in for all leads. Don’t purchase data (to grow your list, sponsor events, use list rental services that send the first message for you, or use co-branded content that sends you only good leads) Email everyone you want to email at least once every six months Don’t add old data directly to your mailing list (if you need to, add in small batches and send a welcome email with a slightly different subject to each batch) Regularly clean your database of inactive leads Grant access to assets such as free trials and whitepapers as email links to discourage intentional use of fake email addresses on forms Use scripting on your forms to identify potential typos
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FAQs Included in this Article: Overview Are RTP campaign designs responsive Can you see how your RTP campaigns will be displayed on multiple devices Can campaigns be displayed only on one page Can I insert JavaScript to RTP campaigns Can RTP campaigns be blocked by ad blockers or JavaScript blockers Does marketo RTP support animated GIF files Does RTP impact SEO Does RTP support HTML5 How does Any Page in the Target URL field work How does RTP A/B testing work How accurate is RTP's reverse IP geolocation targeting How to use the User Context API segmentation What are the recommended sizes for RTP campaigns What is a conversion in RTP What is the limit of organizations you can target for an RTP campaign What is the limit of names allowed in the 'Organizations' criteria What is the limit of rows exported in an Excel export What is the limit of Zip Codes allowed What is the limit of segments allowed   Overview Segments and campaigns are powerful tools in the Web Personalization platform for targeting groups of potential leads and pushing them relevant content. Segments allow you to target your audience based on demographic fields like organization, location, and lead status, or based on behavioral fields like number of visits, mobile device used, or search terms used. Campaigns use segments to personalize your marketing efforts, allowing you to deliver relevant content to specific segments of your audience. This doc will answer some of the most frequently asked questions about segments and campaigns in RTP. If you would like to first learn the basics of using segments and campaigns, read through this collection of documents that will get you started: Getting Started (RTP)     Are RTP campaign designs responsive Yes. This means that RTP campaigns will work on mobile devices and will adapt to the sizing of mobile websites. Only Dialog and Widget campaigns are affected by screen sizes, as In Zone campaigns behave as embedded parts of the website. There are RTP Mobile Templates for fitting dialog campaigns to all mobile screen sizes.   Furthermore, in the segment editor, you can segment by mobile device type and manually create campaigns that appear differently on different devices.     Can you see how your RTP campaigns will be displayed on multiple devices In the campaign editor, you can use the preview tool to view how an RTP campaign will look. This tool will allow you to change the view settings to preview your campaign on all different kinds of devices with different screen sizes.     Can campaigns be displayed only on one page Yes, this can be done by using the "Include Pages" field in the segment editor        Go to the Segments page and hit the Edit button on the segment associated with your campaign        Use the Include Pages field to enter the specific page that you wish to have the campaign display on        You can also use this field to include any page with a specific keyword in the URL. To do this, use wildcard characters (*) which will match any sequence of characters. For example, "*product*" will match any URL that contains the keyword "product".     Can I insert JavaScript to RTP campaigns The RTP's campaign editor supports any standard and valid HTML, JavaScript, or CSS codes. Invalid codes will be stripped off the campaign's HTML   While using valid HTML, JavaScript, or CSS will work as expected, the use of jQuery can be problematic. Campaigns generally load very fast, especially In Zone campaigns, and they will often load before jQuery even exists on the web page. This can cause error messages in the developer's console or issues loading the campaign. If you need to use jQuery on your page, contact Marketo Support and we can try to come up with a simple workaround. Advanced solutions will need to be developed by a third party developer or the PS (product services?) team.     Can RTP campaigns be blocked by ad blockers or JavaScript blockers Basically, no. For a more in depth answer, please see Web Personalization (RTP) - Can RTP Campaigns Be Blocked by Ad Blockers or JavaScript Blockers     Does marketo RTP support animated GIF files Yes, we do support both static and animated GIF files in RTP campaigns. We do still recommend you preview and test the campaign to assure that the GIF appears as you hoped it would.     Does RTP impact SEO RTP does not affect any SEO performance and in some cases it can even improve SEO ranks due to longer website engagement. Search engines use robots to crawl through the content of web sites, which happens before RTP runs campaigns and personalizes content. This means that content from RTP does not get picked up by the search engines' robots, and will not contribute to a web page's rank. In many cases, RTP will actually improve a web page's SEO rank. Since RTP can increase engagement among a page's visitors, it can improve behavioral metrics like average time on a site, pages per visit, etc.     Does RTP support HTML5 Yes, all campaign types in RTP support HTML5.     How does Any Page in the Target URL field work The "Any Page" option in the target URL means that once the visitor matches the target segment, the campaign will be shown regardless of which page they are on within your web site.     How does RTP A/B testing work A/B testing a campaign consists of deploying slightly different versions of a campaign to test which version performs the best. To learn how to A/B test a campaign, see AB Test Your Web Campaign   The test works by randomly selecting a certain percentage of users to see one version of the campaign, and the rest see the second version. If the campaign is set to be Sticky (you can find this option in the campaign editor, shown below), the visitor will see one version of the campaign for their entire session on your web site. This means if the user is first shown campaign B, they will keep seeing campaign B until the end of their session. In that visitor's next session, they may see either campaign A or B.   If the campaign is not Sticky, the visitor will only be shown the campaign once during their session, whether that be campaign A or B. In their next session, they will again only be shown the campaign once, and again it could be either campaign A or B.     How can RTP recognize the search term When you visit a web page, your browser will keep track of the URL of web page that you were on directly before getting to that page. This is known as the "referral" URL. With the referrer URL, it is relatively simple to extract the search terms.   RTP uses this ability to extract search terms from the referral URL to determine the search terms used and record them in Marketo.   Unfortunately, Google has recently begun to withhold and encrypt much of this data, making it impossible for RTP to extract the search terms in some cases. For now though, you will still be able to get all search terms from other search engines like Yahoo and Bing.     How the RTP industries and organization groups are defined Industries In the segment editor there is an option to target visitors that come from specific industries, including: Agriculture & Mining Business Services Computers & Electronics Consumer Services Defense Education Energy & Utilities Financial Services Government Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, & Biotech Manufacturing Media & Entertainment Non-Profit Other Read Estate & Construction Retial Software & Internet Telecommunications Transportation & Storage Travel Recreation and Leisure Wholesale & Distribution   Marketo uses advanced machine learning algorithms to determine the industry based on data from _____. Marketo also uses keywords in the organization's name to get a better match for its industry. For example, an organization named "UCSF Medical Center " probably belongs to healthcare just based on the name itself, and "Stanford University " probably belongs in Education.   Organization Groups You can also target visitors in companies of various sizes, or Organization Groups, including: Fortune 500 Fortune 1000 Global 2000 Enterprise SMB   Marketo uses Forbes' annually updated lists to determine companies in the Fortune 500, Fortune 1000, and Global 2000 groups. Enterprise companies are defined as those with more than 1,000 employees and revenue greater than $250 million. SMB companies are all (non-ISP) organizations that are not defined as any of the above.   For more information on segment categories, visit: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Using+Web+Segments     How accurate is RTP's reverse IP geolocation targeting IP based geo-location targeting has a 95% accuracy rates for country level and around 85% for states. For ISPs (Internet Service Providers) it is less accurate, because they often use different physical proxies and change their routing more often. Over time we follow the changes and update our database continuously.     Is it possible to redirect target visitors to specific pages Please see Web Personalization (RTP) - Redirect Targeted Visitors to Specific Pages     Is it possible to use segmentations from the Lead Database in RTP Currently this is not a feature that RTP supports. However, see this document if you wish to implement a work-around.     Is there a way to restore a deleted campaign There is no way to restore a deleted campaign in RTP. However, if you need to restore a deleted campaign, contact Marketo Support and it can be done if it was recently deleted. Unfortunately even restoring the campaign through Marketo Support will not restore the campaign's performance statistics.     RTP or CMS campaigns - which will win CMS campaigns are generally injected to the web page, meaning it runs before the page loads. RTP, on the other hand, runs as the page is loading. Since RTP campaigns run after CMS campaigns, they will override the CMS campaign and the page will only show the RTP campaign.     How to use the User Context API segmentation The User Context API is a very advanced and technical functionality. All of its documentation can be found here, on the Marketo Developers database.     What are the recommended sizes for RTP campaigns Of course the size of your RTP campaigns is up to your discretion, but here are our recommendations for various types of campaigns: Dialog (Square Pop-up): 250 x 250 pixels Widget (Medium Rectangle): 300 x 250 pixels For more standard sizes: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_banner#/media/File:Standard_web_banner_ad_sizes.svg     What does the "Marketo Email Campaign" option mean When creating a segment with the filter "Marketo Email Campaign", the segment will only match visitors that visit your website after clicking an email in the specified campaign.       What happens when a visitor qualifies for more than one campaign When a visitor qualifies to see more than one campaign, depending on the types, you may see multiple campaigns on the page or only one. Below is a table explaining what happens when a visitor qualifies for two campaigns:     When only one campaign is to be shown, the campaign that is displayed is chosen randomly between the two. When a visitor qualifies for two In Zone campaigns with the same Zone ID, the campaign that is displayed is also chosen randomly.     What is a conversion in RTP A direct conversion is a visitor that became a lead after clicking on an RTP campaign. In a summary report, you will see the Direct Lead Conversion Rate, which is simply the percentage of clicks on the ampaign that lead to direct conversions.     What is the limit of organizations you can target for an RTP campaign There are no constraints on the number of organizations included in a campaign.     What is the limit of names allowed in the 'Organizations' criteria The limit is 100 names. It is a best practice to use dynamic lists instead. Dynamic lists will generally perform better because they are designed to index and handle larger lists.   What is the limit of rows exported in an Excel export By default, RTP limits the number of rows in an Excel (CSV) export to 100.  If you need more rows than that, you can increase it by going to User Settings and changing the value for 'Number of Rows in Excel Export.'  The maximum allowed is 10,000 rows     What is the limit of Zip Codes allowed You can enter up to 6,500 zip codes. They must be separated by semicolons (01234;12345; etc.)     What is the limit of segments allowed The segment limit varies: it can be 30, 60, or unlimited depending on your Marketo subscription type. If you have reached your subscription's limit, you will want to clear out segments that are not being used.   If you get an error message saying you've reached your limit, yet you believe your subscription makes you eligible for more segments, contact Marketo Support.
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Access to Marketo services was temporarily disrupted recently. Below are answers to some of the most common questions you may have. This document has been updated as of 10:30pm PDT on 7/26/2017 to provide the most up to date information available. Is this article helpful ? YesNo   Q: Why couldn’t I access my Marketo subscription? A: Login access goes through the affected Marketo.com domain, so users were not able to access the login page (app.marketo.com).   Q: If the domain issue has been fixed, why am I still not able to access my Marketo subscription? A: Domain information is passed through the internet over DNS (Domain Name System) servers. There are many different DNS servers around the globe, and as domain information changes, those changes need to be passed to all of those DNS servers – what is referred to as propagation. Different servers get updated at different rates, therefore in some regions the propagation completed, while in others it is still in process.   Q: I had access to my Marketo instance, however I wasn’t able to access it again later. What is causing this? A: DNS servers pass data across multiple channels. While the domain information is being propagated, these different channels within the DNS can each be propagated at different rates. When connecting to your Marketo instance, it uses one channel, but that isn’t always the same channel the next time. If one of these channels has fully propagated, but the other is not, then you would be able to access your Marketo instance the first time, but not the second time.   Q: If the marketo.com DNS access issue was resolved, why are we still having issues with accessing Marketo? A: On average, most DNS servers will be updated within 24 hours but can take up to 48 hours to update. However, this is a guideline, not a rule. There are a very large number of DNS servers out there. Every ISP in the world has their own DNS server and most large companies have their own. There is unfortunately no way to know when precisely each one will be updated, or which ones failed to update.   Even after an ISP’s DNS server has propagated, you could still experience issues if your own local network has not updated. The last known version of a domain can be cached within a local system and may need to be flushed out to pull down the updated information from the DNS server. We recommend that you contact your network team or whomever manages your DNS server and request that they reset the zone record   For more information on what factors affect DNS propagation time, check out this article from GoDaddy. Marketo does not happen to use GoDaddy, however this article contains some helpful information.   Q: Was Marketo Sales Insight affected? A: Yes. You may experience a lag in how long it takes for the Sales Insight portion of a Lead/Contact page in SFDC to load. This in turn can also cause the entire Lead/Contact page to load slowly.   Q: Was there any security risk while the domain was unregistered? A: No. There was no possibility of any security risk or data accessibility while the domain was unregistered. The domain was restricted and locked so it could not be taken. This is part of an extra layer of security already applied to the domain.   Q: Was my branded domain affected? (The answer to this question has been updated) A: Upon closer investigation, this could have been affected: Branded domain refers to the ability to show your hyperlinks as coming from your own company as opposed to coming from Marketo. The settings of your branding domain itself have not been touched and the branding domain itself is still configured the same way. Hyperlinks using a branded domain were affected. It was originally reported that they would not be, however upon closer investigation, we’ve found that those hyperlinks do still pass through part of Marketo’s domain. Therefore, some customers with branded domains did have links that could not connect properly.   Q: How were my campaigns affected? A: All batch campaigns continued to run as expected. Any Trigger campaign listening for embedded form fill outs were not triggered given these domains were inaccessible and forms could not be filled out. All other Trigger campaigns continued to run as expected.   Q: Were my emails delivered? A: Marketo uses dedicated domains for each customer which are not linked to the affected domain. Email delivery and tracking was not affected.   Q: Were images and hyperlinks affected? (The answer to this question has been updated) A: Yes. Images and hyperlinks for non-branded domains would not resolve (time-out). Hyperlinks and images for branded domains intermittently did not render depending on many different variables.   Q: Were landing pages affected? A: Landing pages should not have been affected. We are currently investigating this to completely verify.   Q: Were forms affected? A: Some forms were affected. Forms that are embedded on your own site were affected.   Q: If affected, can that form data be recovered? A: Since the form was not accessible, no data was input, and therefore no data is lost.  We recognize that we were not able to capture form fill out data and we truly apologize for this inconvenience.   Q: Were any API calls affected? A: There have been some reports of API calls giving errors, however it is not yet confirmed whether this is directly related or not. If you have received errors, please Contact Marketo Support  and supply the full API call and Response in the case created.   Q: Was any data lost during this time? ( The answer to this question has been updated ) A:  No data loss occurred. All backend processing was working as expected. However, if leads took an action that could not be registered by Marketo, then the activity data from that wouldn’t be logged. This will affect reporting.   For example: Marketo uses a single clear tracking pixel to register email opens. When that image file is served by the Marketo server, it registers it as an open activity. If that image for the single tracking pixel does not resolve because it could not connect to the domain, then the open activity could not be registered. The same would be true of clicks on tracked hyperlinks. If the link does not connect to the domain, then the link click activity cannot be logged.   Q: Was there any impact on reporting? A: Yes. As described above, if leads had activity that could not be completed such as clicking on a hyperlink that did not connect, then those activities could not be logged, and therefore would not be shown in your reports.   Q: Was this issue resolved? The issue preventing Marketo.com domain access was largely resolved as of Noon PDT on July 25.   However, DNS propagation can take longer in some locations, based on network setup.  We assure you that the application continued to operate in background and your data was never at risk.
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Included in this article Overview The configuration changes being made will require customers to recreate some fields if they want to still use that data within SFDC. Once the fields are recreated, the backfill process begins, which in turn starts a global resync of all leads from SFDC to Marketo. This will push a lot of data between Marketo and SFDC. To minimize the risk of a traffic jam, we will be scheduling this roll out over the course of 6 months. This gives all customers a set time frame to work with and helps to avoid peaks in traffic. If the time scheduled for you doesn’t work out, we’ll try to accommodate another time within this six month timeframe that does work well for you. Alphabetical Scheduling Details The changes being made will be staggered over 6 months in order to ensure we don’t cause any traffic jams while passing data back and forth. The best way to schedule this is to go in alphabetical order. This order will be alphabetically by your Marketo instance’s Account String, not your company name . Please check the section below for how to find your Account String. We have done a careful analysis of our customer’s lead database sizes and have grouped batches of customers together based on size of the lead databases, so some groups have more customers in them than other groups do. Each group of customers will be given a time frame to work with to recreate the fields and initiate the backfill process. Timeline The six month time frame will begin on August 15th and will continue on until the end of January, 2017. Specific Timing The customer base has been split into the following groups with times scheduled for deployment. If you intend to recreate the fields and initiate the data backfill process, here is the schedule for when you can recreate those fields: Group Customers Date Range of Deployment Group 1 Account String Begins With: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9 August 15 th to August 31 st Group 2 Account String Begins With: A, B or C September 1 st to September 30 th Group 3 Account String Begins With: D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K or L October 1 st to October 31 st Group 4 Account String Begins With: M, N, O or P November 1 st to November 30 th Group 5 Account String Begins With: Q or R December 1 st to December 31 st Group 6 Account String Begins With: S, T, U, V, W, X, Y or Z January 1 st to January 31 st How to locate your Account String In your Marketo instance, navigate to Admin > Landing pages. You’ll see your Account String listed right in the middle of the screen. Scheduling Requests Marketo understands that this change could be an inconvenience and specific timing may be needed for our customers to plan accordingly. If you have a different time within the 6 month window that works better for your company, please reach out and we’ll accommodate as best we can. You can reach Marketo Support through the Support Portal, by email, or over the phone. Specifics on how to contact Marketo Support can be found here: Contact Marketo Support Info Needed for Scheduling Requests. What your preferred dates are . We’re happy to accommodate your schedule, so please be sure to tell us what that is. It’s best to give us a range or a few options of what scheduled dates work best for you, not just one set date. The details of your Marketo instance. In order to quickly identify your Marketo instance, we’ll need your Account String, which is a unique identifier for your Marketo instance. If you have more than one Marketo instance, please be sure to mention that and include the Account Strings for each one. Where to Go for More Information Recap Summary Now that the changes have been completed, and the deprecation date has passed, this doc will give you the overview of what has happened: Changes to Marketo Salesforce Sync - Recap Summary Frequently Asked Questions Check out our FAQ for the answers to the most commonly asked questions. Changes to Marketo Salesforce Sync – Frequently Asked Questions Overview Documentation This doc will give you a high level overview of what the configuration changes are and what to expect moving forward: Changes to Marketo Salesforce Sync - Overview Discussion thread We've created this discussion thread in the community to address any questions you may have. This discussion thread will be monitored by the Marketo team to ensure you get answers to your questions. Changes to Marketo Salesforce Sync – Questions and Discussion Under the Hood Documentation This doc will give you all of the nitty gritty details of exactly what is happening. If you're looking for in depth technical details, this is the go-to doc to check out! Changes to Marketo Salesforce Sync – Under The Hood Recreating Affected Fields There are different versions of Salesforce, but don't worry, all of the details on how to recreate the affected fields as well as a video tutorial can all be found in the documentation here: Adding Marketo Fields to Salesforce   Preventing Problems In Salesforce Recreating the new fields in Salesforce can cause your Workflows, Apex Triggers, Reports and AppExchange apps behave differently. They'll need to be updated and this doc will show you what to watch out for: Changes to Marketo Salesforce Sync – Preventative Troubleshooting Contact Marketo Support If you would prefer to talk to someone live, please contact Marketo Support over any of the channel listed here: Contact Marketo Support
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DMARC can be supported through DKIM alignment OR SPF alignment.   For DMARC verified by DKIM alignment Set up DKIM for the domain used in the From Address. OR For DMARC verified by SPF alignment This requires that the SMTP Mail From or bounce addresses used by Marketo's servers when sending the email be aligned with the From Address the recipient sees in the email envelope.  To put this alignment in place: Set up a branded SMTP Mail From (also known as bounce domain, envelope_from, Return Path).  To put this in place there are the following options: Send from a dedicated IP through Marketo, contact your salesperson or CSM to set this up. Send from a Trusted Marketo IP by applying here.  Branding is offered for free to customers sending from Marketo's Trusted IPs.  Once approved for this program reach out to Support to ask for the additional domain branding. Trusted IPs: A shared pool of IPs reserved for lower volume customers who can not qualify for a dedicated IP.  These customers must also meet best practice requirements as well. Purchase one-off domain branding if sending from a Shared Marketo IP, contact your salesperson or CSM to set this up.     Do you wonder what DMARC is? Review this What is DMARC?.
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Issue Description Issue in delivering Marketo Email (especially for mimecast users). Email get bounced with Error: 550 Rejected by header based Anti-Spoofing policy Issue Resolution This error can happen if: You have not properly white listed the Marketo IPs You have an ssue with DKIM/SPF set up and configuration Please whitelist the set of Marketo IPs found in the doc below and make sure SPF and DKIM are set up correctly for your email domain https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Configure+Protocols+for+Marketo
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At Marketo it is a violation of our Email Use Policy to send cold emails to purchased email addresses.   Adobe's Acceptable Use Policy Compliance with this Acceptable Use Policy (“AUP”) protects the interests of individuals using the Internet, the reputation and goodwill of Adobe, it's subsidiaries, and that of those using Adobe services.  Ensuring the utmost standards of email marketing is our collective responsibility.   Prohibition against Unsolicited Email/Spam: Customers must refrain from directly or indirectly sending, transmitting, distributing, or delivering: (i) Unsolicited bulk email ("spam" or "spamming”) i.e., emails to persons who have not consented to the receipt of such emails by providing their email address in a manner from which consent to receive email may be reasonably implied. (ii) Email to an address obtained via Internet harvesting or other surreptitious methods (e.g., scraping, renting, purchased list, co-registration, affiliate marketing, incomplete or old lists; or email appending).  Adobe defines email appending as a marketing practice that involves taking known Customer Data (name, address, etc.) and matching it against a third-party vendor’s database to obtain email addresses. (iii) Email that generates abuse/spam complaints or spam trap hits resulting in IP/Domain block listing or other deliverability issues that could have material impact on Adobe or its client’s reputation.   Inclusion of Opt-Out Provision: Customers must ensure all commercial emails sent include a provision for recipients to "opt-out" or revoke permission of receiving any future messages from Customer.  To that end, Customer agrees: (i) To use the unsubscribe tools provided by Adobe; or (ii) To have procedures in place to allow a recipient to easily opt-out, such as: (a) a clear appended link for recipients to easily opt-out of receiving future messages, or (b) Instructions to reply with the word "Remove" in the subject line; and (iii) Unsubscribes should be removed without delay with no future messages being sent unless future permission is granted.   General Prohibitions Customers transmitting content through Adobe services must not misrepresent or obscure their identity in any way or mislead recipients through use of invalid or forged headers, misleading subject lines or content, or domain names not owned or controlled by Customer. Customer must not transmit any messages through Adobe services with content that is threatening, abusive, harassing, defamatory, deceptive, false, fraudulent, vulgar, obscene, indecent, or illegal. Customer is strictly prohibited from transmitting or providing Adobe any sensitive information as that term may be used in applicable laws, or where no laws apply, individuals’ financial account information, sexual preferences, medical or health information, and/or personal information of children protected under any child protection laws.  Notwithstanding the foregoing, if a Marketo Engage Customer is regulated by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”), has a subscription to encrypt Customer Data at rest, and has signed a Business Associate Addendum with Adobe or its affiliate for its use of Marketo Engage, then Customer is prohibited from transmitting a subset of health information, including medical or health records or information reflecting the payment of such treatment.   AUP Enforcement and Updates Violations of the AUP will be deemed a material risk to the continued normal operation of Adobe services and may result in immediate revocation of Customer’s license or subscription to use the applicable services.  Adobe may review relevant data to determine Customers’ compliance with this AUP.   The full text of the policy is here: https://www.adobe.com/legal/terms/aup.html Is there ever an acceptable use for purchased data?  Yes. The Marketo Compliance Team supports the following uses for purchased data: Generate personalized URLs and send to purchased leads by postal mail Use purchased data to fill in additional details about leads who only provide an email address at the time of opt in - this makes for great targeting! When operating in a small market of known leads, purchased data can be useful for research purposes to track information about your target market Purchased leads can be contacted by phone to obtain email permission   The global anti-spam community does not consider permission to be transferable, except in the following circumstances: A company is wholly acquired by a new parent company; emails sent will include the same content from new owners A division of a company - product or brand - is acquired by a new parent company; emails sent will include the same content from new owners   Both parts of the above are key. Personal data alone may not be transferred with permission intact because permission is contextual. Even in the case of an acquisition additional permission is required if the emails will include significantly different content.   To provide an illustration, when "Acme" acquired a home video camera company they acquired permission to continue to email the company's leads about selling home video cameras. That does not mean they have permission to email those people about every other product in "Acme's" portfolio. Email permission was granted to receive emails about home video products, not anything else. "Acme" could email those people and ask them to opt in to their other mailing lists, but acquiring a company does not give the new parent company the right to add the child company's opted-in leads to all their other unrelated mailing lists.   Data vendors may say the leads they sell are "opted-in," but this is not true according to the standards set forth by the global antispam community.  Even if these individuals genuinely wished for the data vendor to sell their email addresses (often demonstrably untrue), they still would not have provided direct permission to the buyer to send them email. Marketo requires that permission be direct to the sender (or that there is an existing business relationship) to send email within our Terms. Many data companies offer list rental services where the data company sends an initial message, and passes on only the information of recipients who respond to the offer.   Marketo is not the only vendor in the marketplace with this philosophy against purchased lists, it is a widely know issue that purchased lists drive delivery issues. Purchased Lists and ESPs - Word to the Wise  
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So you’ve now used the previous document (Getting Started With Guided Landing Pages:) to download a template from our library and set it up in your Marketo instance, you have even used it to make a landing page or two and you’ve customized those landing pages, all of which is fantastic news! Good job!   But now you’re looking at the template and things need to be changed: That’s a good start, but the Elements on the page may not seem “right” to you. We have an image on the left, a text headline on the right and a form below the text headline.   What if that’s NOT the layout you intended? What if, instead, you wanted the headline at the top, centered on the page and the image and the form side by side below the headline?   All of the elements on the template can be added, removed, re-ordered, changed up, switched out and modified. Doing so, however, absolutely requires knowledge of HTML. As stated before, if you are not comfortable editing HTML and do not have a resource available to you, please reach out to services@marketo.com, they are able to assist with any sort of coding needs.   Editing a Template:   Let’s go back to the template we created before and edit it and see what we can do about that image, form and headline.   Every object on a Guided Template is called an “Element”, you can see a list of the elements being used on any given page in the right hand pane of the landing page editor. However, that’s not all the elements that can be used on a landing page.   The full list of template elements can be found here: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Create+a+Guided+Landing+Page+Template   So looking at that list, and knowing we want to change the layout of a text headline, image and form, the Elements we should be looking for are marked like this: class : "mktoText" class: "mktoImg" class : "mktoForm"   That seems easy enough, let’s look at the code and see what we can see.   Scrolling down through the code you will see first a bunch of variables defined. Variables are another sort of item that can be changed on a responsive landing page, please see Editing Marketo Guided Landing Page Templates, Pt. 2 - Variables:  which follows this one. Following that is a bunch of CSS code. CSS stands for “Cascading Style Sheets” and is a way of formatting the same thing over and over again, kind of like setting a font in a word processor. You wouldn’t want to have to re-set your font and size every time you start a new paragraph, right? CSS helps maintain a consistent look and feel across the entire document. Following the CSS, we get to the main section of the template, the <body> section. The <body> tag typically contains what you and I would consider to be “THE” web page. Everything above the body helps define how the web page looks and feels, but the <body> contains the actual content.   Sure enough, right there inside the <body> tag on lines 290 to 295 are the Elements we’re looking for: Each of the Elements we want to re-order are located inside <div> tags. A <div> tag is just a way of separating out one part of the page from the rest of the page. This section is marked as being “special” and the “class=” attribute is telling us in what way this section is special.   Each section starts with <div and ends with </div> closing it off. In HTML it’s important to close elements that have been started, so if we’re going to change the order of things, it’s important to select the entire section, from the <div to the </div>   More on HTML <div> tags here: http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_div.asp   HTML renders everything from left to right and from top to bottom. In the code, we are first defining the mktoImage, following that with mktoText and finally with mktoForm. That’s why the objects appear on the landing page in that order: In order to change the layout in a specific way, we will have to take each of the <div> tags containing elements and place them in a table. A table is a way in HTML to order things in terms of rows and columns. The <table> tag is one of the oldest tags in HTML and works on pretty much every HTML capable device.   More on the <table> tag here: http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_table.asp   Wrapping the Elements in a table is pretty straightforward. Copy the code to a text editor:        <div class="mktoImg col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered" id="primaryImage" mktoName="Primary Image" style="min-height:100%;" mktoImgClass="expandToFit"></div>      <div class="col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered"><div class="mktoText" id="primaryBodyHeader" mktoName="Primary Header"><h1>Alice's Adventures in Wonderland</h1></div></div>      <div class="mktoForm" id="primaryForm" mktoName="Primary Form" style="margin-bottom:40px;padding:10px;min-height:80px;"></div>   Step 1 is to change the order, we want the text to come first:        <div class="col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered"><div class="mktoText" id="primaryBodyHeader" mktoName="Primary Header"><h1>Alice's Adventures in Wonderland</h1></div></div>      <div class="mktoImg col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered" id="primaryImage" mktoName="Primary Image" style="min-height:100%;" mktoImgClass="expandToFit"></div>      <div class="mktoForm" id="primaryForm" mktoName="Primary Form" style="margin-bottom:40px;padding:10px;min-height:80px;"></div>   Step 2 is to wrap the content in a table. Inside the <table> tag are special tags that define the rows and columns. <tr> sets up each row and as you saw with the </div> tag is marked with a </tr> ending the row.   <td> defines each column, I know it’s confusing having <tr> where “r” clearly means “row”. You’d think it would be <tc> for column, but trust me, it’s <td>.   More on <tr> and <td> here: http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_tr.asp http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_td.asp   <table>      <tr>           <td>                <div class="col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered"><div class="mktoText" id="primaryBodyHeader" mktoName="Primary Header"><h1>Alice's Adventures in Wonderland</h1></div></div>           </td>      </tr>      <tr>           <td>                <div class="mktoImg col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered" id="primaryImage" mktoName="Primary Image" style="min-height:100%;" mktoImgClass="expandToFit"></div>           </td>           <td>                <div class="mktoForm" id="primaryForm" mktoName="Primary Form" style="margin-bottom:40px;padding:10px;min-height:80px;"></div>           </td>      </tr> </table>   This is the basic structure of the table. There are going to be some tweaks needed, but let’s see how this looks first. Put this in place of the code currently in the template like so: The indented tabs here aren't JUST for readability. The Guided Template Editor has build in code validation and it will return errors if you try to have your elements on the same line as the TD's and TR's. Make sure each item is on it's own line.   Go back and re-approve the draft and then edit the landing page we made before. It’s not pretty, but that’s OK. First we have to get the structure the way we want it, making it look pretty is the very last thing we do.   What we have here is the text headline on the top, which is great. The image and the form are below, left and right, respectively, side by side. That’s just what we wanted.   The problem is that we have a row with one column on top of a row with two columns and that has skewed things slightly. Fortunately this is an easy fix. We just need to take the single column in row 1 and make it stretch across both columns in row 2.   To do that, we add an attribute. Attributes modify the way tags behave.   In the template go back to the code we inserted and find the <table> tag where we set the whole thing up. First we’re going to control the width of the table:        <table width=”100%”>   This tells the browser to render the table at 100% the width of the screen.   Now find the <td> tag that contains the text element.             <td>                <div class="col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered"><div class="mktoText" id="primaryBodyHeader" mktoName="Primary Header"><h1>Alice's Adventures in Wonderland</h1></div></div>           </td>   Add the following attribute like so:             <td colspan=”2” width=”100%”>                <div class="centered"><div class="mktoText" id="primaryBodyHeader" mktoName="Primary Header"><h1>Alice's <br>Adventures in <br>Wonderland</h1></div></div>           </td>   So what we’ve told it here is to span two columns and take up 100% the width of the table, and since the table is already 100% the width of the screen, this should fit the page as well. We’ve also changed the class on the <div> so that it simply reads “centered”. This should center the title based on the CSS code defined above.   Now find the <td> tags that contain the image and the form and adjust them to 50% each like so:             <td width="50%">                <div class="mktoImg col-lg-6 col-md-6 centered" id="primaryImage" mktoName="Primary Image" style="min-height:100%;" mktoImgClass="expandToFit"></div>           </td>           <td width="50%">                 <div class="mktoForm" id="primaryForm" mktoName="Primary Form" style="margin-bottom:40px;padding:10px;min-height:80px;"></div>           </td>   Go back and approve the template change and edit a draft of your landing page. There you go! Now if we were preview this and change the size of the window, we get this (image and form are blank as they have not yet been added.)
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  So you’ve now used the previous document (Getting Started With Guided Landing Pages:) to download a template from our library and set it up in your Marketo instance, you have even used it to make a landing page or two and you’ve customized those landing pages, AND you’ve even gone the extra mile and customized your template and modified some elements! (Editing Marketo Guided Landing Page Templates, Pt. 1 - Elements:) All of which is fantastic news! Good job!   But if you recall from the article that showed you how to edit Elements on the template, I skipped right over the section on Variables. This is the piece that this document is designed to tackle.   So what is a variable? If you edit a Guided Landing Page you will see a panel on the right hand side that displays both Elements and Variables. In this instance, the variables do everything from assigning a gradient color, to deciding if you want to display or hide different sections of the landing page.   Modifying a variable in the landing page editor is designed to be really simple, just click the variable you want to change and give it a new value. Here I changed the Primary Gradient 1 and 2 from 1DA083 and 0F3450 to A00E35 and F2F2F2 respectively and the landing page changes:   At its easiest to understand, a variable works a lot like a token in an email. It’s a placeholder for actual code to be used later. So if I create an email that starts with “Hello, {{lead.firstname:default=Friend}}!” you can tell right away what that’s going to do. Pull the first name from the lead record, if none exists use the word “Friend”.   Think of a Variable as a token that you get to define as well as use. The first step is to define it and the second step is to actually call back to the variable you defined.   While it’s easy for a non-technical user to use a variable (as it should be!), setting one up in the template does require a fair amount of HTML knowledge. As stated before, if you are not comfortable editing HTML and do not have a resource available to you, please reach out to services@marketo.com, they are able to assist with any sort of coding needs.   So as before, let’s dive into the template, this time we’re going straight for the Variable code.       <!-- Marketo Variable Definitions -->     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient1" mktoName="Primary Gradient 1" default="#1da083">     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient2" mktoName="Primary Gradient 2" default="#0f3450">   So right at the start of the template, we’re off to the races defining variables. As you can see with the Gradient 1 and Gradient 2, these are both marked with a class of “mktoColor”.   As with the Elements, the full list of Variable types can be found here: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Create+a+Guided+Landing+Page+Template        class : "mktoString"      class : "mktoColor"      class : "mktoBoolean"   A string is a variable that contains a value, Color should be obvious what that does and Boolean is a yes or no choice.   In addition to the class, each variable has to have a unique ID. This is critical and used when the variable is called later on down the page. When you call a variable it’s always with the syntax of ${id name}. So in this case ${gradient1} and ${gradient2}. As you can see it looks a LOT like a token but it’s a token you can name whatever you want.   The mktoName is how it displays the variable in the Landing Page editor.   The default value is what it starts out with.   So let’s take a look and see how these Gradients are applied now that they’re defined at the top of the template.   Color is typically used in the CSS portion of the header. As defined in the previous document, CSS stands for “Cascading Style Sheets” and is a way of formatting the same thing over and over again, kind of like setting a font in a word processor.       /* Header Gradient */     #is {         top: 0;         width: 100%;         min-height: 620px;         position: relative;         z-index: 1;         color: #fff; padding-top: 10%;                 background-image: linear-gradient(${gradient1},${gradient2});     }   Now normally in CSS, the linear-gradient option would have two colors listed, the top color and the bottom color and it provides a gradual transition from one to the other.   We could just as easily change this in the template to        background-image: linear-gradient(red,white);   But the problem doing that is that an end user, who is only using the Landing Page Editor, would not be able to change it. The gradient would be defined in the template and inaccessible to the Editor.   Changing these values to the variables defined before allows the user to change the first and second colors in the Landing Page editor interface.   In Summary:   The Meta Tags define what the variables mean:     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient1" mktoName="Primary Gradient 1" default="#1da083">     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient2" mktoName="Primary Gradient 2" default="#0f3450">   The ID= is then used to call the variable and put it into action:       background-image: linear-gradient(${gradient1},${gradient2});   The other benefit to doing it this way is you can re-use the same variable over and over again. Look at this piece of CSS:   body {                 background: ${gradient2};         margin: 0;         color: #696E74;     }   That’s the same ID as the gradient we used before, only applied to a different section. This ensures that the bottom color of the gradient and the background of this section will always be the same color.   Any item in the CSS that contains a text value, a color value or a yes/no choice can be converted to a Variable.   Here’s another common usage:   You’re using a form on your landing page, but you want the end user to be able to change the text on the submit button.   As before you define the variable:        <meta class="mktoString" id="section4ButtonLabel" mktoName="Sec. 4 Button Label" default="More Questions?">   Then farther down the page where the button appears you call the variable you defined before:        <div class="centered mtb">           <a href="${section4ButtonLink}"><button class="btn btn-lg btn-green mt">           ${section4ButtonLabel}</button></a>      </div>   The <a href= is pulling a http link that the user can define in the editor, the button class is setting up a green button as defined in the CSS, and there is our Variable to display the label which reads “More Questions?” Here’s what it looks like in the editor:   So this is great, and it makes sense because you can see this was all set up and defined by a professional. What if you wanted to add your own? Is that even possible?   Naturally it is!   First, figure out what you want to convert to a Variable. Is it a piece of text like a button name or a link? Is it a color? Is it a yes/no choice?   Let’s say we want to add a variable that controls the color of the buttons. We have two, both using the same color green, and we want whoever is running the landing page editor to change that without having to go to the template:   Step 1: Define your variable:        <meta class="mktoColor" id="ButtonColor" mktoName="Button Color" default="#1DA083">   We’re talking about colors so the class will be “mktoColor”. The ID can be anything we want it to be as can be the mktoName. The default is the same lovely green shade as was used before.   Now we need to call this color.  Looking at the CSS, we can see the .btn-green is defined as this:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: #1da083;           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }   The background is the color we want to change to a Variable so it can be edited without having to access the template.   Change the code to this:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: ${ButtonColor};           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }     Approve the template and check out the landing page in the editor:     Well that’s fantastic, but there’s a separate color for the border, we could just as easily add a variable for it as well:        border: 4px solid #1da083;   We don’t want to HAVE to add another new variable for just the border. We could change the border at the same time as the button. By changing #1da083; to ${ButtonColor};   The trick now becomes what if you change your mind? What if you have a variable in the template that is no longer desired? How do you get rid of it?   Remember each variable is two pieces, the definition and the call. You have to remove BOTH pieces. Technically removing the call would be enough to prevent the change from being made on the page, but the definition is what makes the variable appear in the Landing Page Editor, if you only removed the call then there would be a non-functional Variable in the landing page editor.   So in the case of our button color:   Step 1 would be to strip out the meta tag containing the definition:     Step 2 would be changing the variable name where it’s being used to some fixed value:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: ${ButtonColor}; -> change this to some other fixed color. #00FF33; or the original #1da083;.           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }   Doing both pieces will prevent the Variable from being listed in the Landing Page Editor and prevent it from having any effect on the page.  
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