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In offering a premium email delivery platform to our customers we carefully monitor our IPs for listings on blacklists (Top Blacklists – What You Need to Know.) The Marketo Privacy team maintains relationships with the major blacklists to better assist our customers in resolving these issues. When we find that one of our customers was responsible for a blacklisting we contact that customer and request some actions be taken to remediate the issue. In many cases we find that sending an email to a spamtrap address (What Is a Spamtrap and Why Do They Matter?) caused the blacklisting.  Spamtraps are email addresses that have either never been used or have not been used for a long time and are now owned by anti-spam organizations. They are considered by these organizations as a sign of poorly maintained or inappropriately acquired addresses. Based on this assessment they conclude that the marketer is sending spam and consequently blacklist the sender.  To prevent future blacklistings you'll need to review your recent activity to remove the spamtrap from your mailing. Finding the spam trap address can be difficult; they are closely guarded secrets of the blacklisting organizations and they do not share these addresses. We describe several strategies below. The best approach for you depends on the make-up of your database and the amount of behavioral history in your Marketo system.The goal is to isolate potential spamtrap addresses and remove them. The group of addresses you select should be broad enough to capture those potentially bad addresses but small enough not to suppress a huge portion of your database. Blacklists are not all the same - some provide Marketo with more information, some with less. If at all possible we will provide you with a date and a subject line to help you isolate potential traps.          Step 1         To narrow the list of potential traps you should consider the following: Have you recently added any new leads or new lead sources? What is the source of these leads? Any purchased or appended email addresses should be removed because these data sources are often the source of newlyintroduced spamtraps. In addition lead sources like this can violate Marketo's Email Use and Anti-Spam Policy Have you recently added any older leads from another database that have not received email in the past year?  Some email providers will turn an address into a spamtrap after a year of inactivity.  If you have a list of addresses that had not received email for a year or more before recent email campaigns this list should be removed. Does your system use any custom fields to indicate customer status, event attendance, recent contact with your sales team, or other forms of engagement?  Take advantage of this and isolate the inactive or nonresponsive segments of your database using all activity data you have available. Is there anything different about this specific mailing that makes it different compared to your previous email campaigns? Did you send any other mail on the same day?  You could compare the recipient lists. Step 2   If you were able to identify newly introduced email addresses to your email program that are likely the source of the spamtrap suppress or remove those from your database so they will not receive email in future email campaigns.    If you have not identified a specific data source than you should target the inactive or nonresponsive segments of your database for potential spamtraps.  Because an individual does not manage spamtrap addresses, they are generally part or a larger spamtrap network; they will generally not show any form of activity. If you have behavioral history, the best approach to take is to identify the people who are not interacting with your company - not opening or clicking emails, not visiting the web page, not attending events, etc.   Build an inactive Smart List using ALL filters: Was sent email the day of and day before the spam trap hit (please contact support@marketo.com for the date of the trap hit if you do not have this information already.) Lead “was created” date is at least 6 months ago Inactivity Filters Not visited web page is “any”; constraint date of activity “in past 3 months” Not filled out form is “any”, constraint date of activity “in past 6 months” Not clicked link in email is “any”, constraint date of activity “in past 6 months” Not opened email is “any”, constraint date of activity “in past 6 months” If you have custom database fields that would show other forms of activity feel free to add this into your inactive Smart List to exclude active leads.   Step 3   Once you have created a smart list to identify these suspect leads you have several options. [Leads Tab > Lead Actions > Flow Actions] Remove leads from database Why waste your time on inactive leads?   Set leads to Marketing Suspended = true to suppress from future mailings Marketing suspended is functionally equivalent to unsubscribe. These leads will still be available for other flow actions, tracking, or operational emails. To avoid suppressing an active lead’s email address you can create a daily recurring batch campaign to take any marketing suspended lead who "wakes up" and engages and set them back to marketing suspended is false.    The daily batch campaign would be set to change Marketing Suspended back to false if the lead performed any specific activity in the last 24 hours like if they visit a web page, open or click a link in an email, fills out a form or has a lead status change. Here's how to set up the campaign:   Smart List (using the "ANY" filter, not "AND"): "Visits Web Page" "Clicks Link in Email" "Fills Out Form" "Opened Email"           All selectors for these filters should be set to 'any'.   Flow: "Change Data Value" flow step Attribute: "Marketing Suspended. New Value: "False".     Opt-In reconfirmation pass Create and release an email to inactive list with the following sample copy: "We have not heard from you in a while. Click this link to continue to receive messages." Anyone who does not click the link within 2 weeks should be set to Marketing Suspended. For recommendations on successful reconfirmation messages search our help articles on Successful Reconfirmation.   Some mix of the above Many of our customers take a tiered approach to blacklist remediation. If they can identify inactive, low-priority leads they may choose to immediately delete or Marketing Suspend these while reserving a reconfirmation pass for higher priority leads. If your list includes extremely high value sales targets you might consider having your sales team reach out individually. If considering this approach we recommend that you export the list and try various sorting techniques to get a feel for the leads you're looking at before deciding on the best way to segment them for different tiers of attention.     Step 4 – You’re Done! Don't forget to fill out the delisting form  
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  Welcome to Marketo Support This guide provides individual links that covers the following topics: Marketo Support Policies Service Level Agreement How to Contact Marketo Support How to Submit a Case Tips on Effective Case Submission Managing Authorized Support Contacts (Support Admins) Managing Your Cases How to Escalate    
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Syntax Recommendations Common Look Up mechanisms a: mx: include: ip4: ip6: exists: ptr: all Common Modifiers redirect= exp= An A Record must ALWAYS contain IP address (map host to IP) CNAME (Alias) must contain hostnames. No IPs here NS an MX records must contain host names. No IPs allowed. MX records (for mail servers)  should contain hostnames NOT IPs. Too Many Mechanisms Section 10.1, "Processing Limits" of the SPF RFC 4408 specifies the following in regards to DNS lookups: SPF implementations MUST limit the number of mechanisms and modifiers that do DNS lookups to at most 10 per SPF check, including any lookups caused by the use of the "include" mechanism or the "redirect" modifier.  If this number is exceeded during a check, a PermError MUST be returned.  The "include", "a", "mx", "ptr", and "exists" mechanisms as well as the "redirect" modifier do count against this limit.  The "all", "ip4", and "ip6" mechanisms do not require DNS lookups and therefore do not count against this limit. The "exp" modifier does not count against this limit because the DNS lookup to fetch the explanation string occurs after the SPF record has been evaluated. This limit is in place to prevent SPF lookups from being a useful avenue for Denial of Service attacks. Using an example SPF record as an example to illustrate, this record was breaking with 12 look-ups: example.com text = "v=spf1 include:_spf-a.example.com include:_spf-b. example .com include:_spf-c. example .com include:_spf-ssg-a. example .com include:spf-a.another example .com ip4:131.107.115.215 ip4:131.107.115.214 ip4:205.248.106.64 ip4:205.248.106.30 ip4:205.248.106.32 ~all" [ 5 mechanisms] _spf-a.example.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:216.99.5.67 ip4:216.99.5.68 ip4:202.177.148.100 ip4:203.122.32.250 ip4:202.177.148.110 ip4:213.199.128.139 ip4:213.199.128.145 ip4:207.46.50.72 ip4:207.46.50.82 a:mh. example .m0.net ~all"  [ +1 = 6 mechanisms] mh.example.m0.net a = 209.11.164.116 _spf-b.example.com text = "v=spf1 include:spf.messaging.example.com ip4:207.46.22.35 ip4:207.46.22.98 ip4:207.46.22.101 ip4:131.107.1.27 ip4:131.107.1.17 ip4:131.107.65.22 ip4:131.107.65.131 ip4:131.107.1.101 ip4:131.107.1.102 ip4:217.77.141.52 ip4:217.77.141.59 ~all" [+1 = 7 mechanisms] spf.messaging.example.com text = "v=spf1 include:spfa.another example .com include:spfb.anotherexaple.com include:spfc.anotherexample.com -all"  [+3 = 10 mechanisms] spfa.anotherexample.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:157.55.116.128/26 ip4:157.55.133.0/24 ip4:157.55.158.0/23 ip4:157.55.234.0/24 ip4:157.56.112.0/24 ip4:157.56.116.0/25 ip4:157.56.120.0/25 ip4:207.46.100.0/24 ip4:207.46.108.0/25 ip4:207.46.163.0/24 ip4:134.170.140.0/24 ip4:157.56.110.0/23 -all" [+0 = 10 mechanisms] spfb.anotherexample.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:207.46.51.64/26 ip4:213.199.154.0/24 ip4:213.199.180.128/26 ip4:216.32.180.0/23 ip4:64.4.22.64/26 ip4:65.55.83.128/27 ip4:65.55.169.0/24 ip4:65.55.88.0/24 ip4:94.245.120.64/26 ip4:131.107.0.0/16 ip4:157.56.73.0/24 ip4:134.170.132.0/24 -all" [+0 = 10 mechanisms] spfc.anotherexample.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:207.46.101.128/26 ip6:2a01:111:f400:7c00::/54 ip6:2a01:111:f400:fc00::/54 ip4:157.56.87.192/26 ip4:157.55.40.32/27 ip4:157.56.123.0/27 ip4:157.56.91.0/27 ip4:157.55.206.0/24 ip4:157.55.207.0/24 ip4:157.56.206.0/23 ip4:157.56.208.0/22 -all" [ +0 = 10 mechanisms] _spf-c.example.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:203.32.4.25 ip4:213.199.138.181 ip4:213.199.138.191 ip4:207.46.52.71 ip4:207.46.52.79 ip4:131.107.1.18 ip4:131.107.1.19 ip4:131.107.1.20 ip4:131.107.1.48 ip4:131.107.1.56 ip4:86.61.88.25 ip4:131.107.1.44 ip4:131.107.1.37 ~all" [+0 = 10 mechanisms] _spf-ssg-a.example.com   text = "v=spf1 include:_spf-ssg-b.example.com include:_spf-ssg-c. example .com ~all"  [+2 = 12 mechanisms] _spf-ssg-b.example.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:207.68.169.173/30 ip4:207.68.176.1/26 ip4:207.46.132.129/27 ip4:207.68.176.97/27 ip4:65.55.238.129/26 ip4:207.46.222.193/26 ip4:207.46.116.135/29 ip4:65.55.178.129/27 ip4:213.199.161.129/27 ip4:65.55.33.70/28 ~all"  [+0 = 12 mechanisms] _spf-ssg-c.example.com text = "v=spf1 ip4:65.54.121.123/29 ip4:65.55.81.53/28 ip4:65.55.234.192/26 ip4:207.46.200.0/27 ip4:65.55.52.224/27 ip4:94.245.112.10/31 ip4:94.245.112.0/27 ip4:111.221.26.0/27 ip4:207.46.50.221/26 ip4:207.46.50.224 ~all" [+0 = 12 mechanisms] spf-a.secondexample.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:157.55.0.192/26 ip4:157.55.1.128/26 ip4:157.55.2.0/25 ip4:65.54.190.0/24 ip4:65.54.51.64/26 ip4:65.54.61.64/26 ip4:65.55.111.0/24 ip4:65.55.116.0/25 ip4:65.55.34.0/24 ip4:65.55.90.0/24 ip4:65.54.241.0/24 ip4:207.46.117.0/24 ~all" [+0 = 12 mechanisms] Character String Too Long 255 character limitation in a single string https://kb.isc.org/article/AA-00356/0/Can-I-have-a-TXT-or-SPF-record-longer-than-255-characters.html http://www.string-functions.com/length.aspx You may have more than 255 characters of data in a TXT or SPF record, but not more than 255 characters in a single string. If you attempt to create an SPF or TXT record with a long string (>255 characters) in it, BIND will give an error (e.g. "invalid rdata format: ran out of space".)  Strings in SPF and TXT records should be no longer than 255 characters.  However to get around this limitation, per RFC 4408 a TXT or SPF record is allowed to contain multiple strings, which should be concatenated together by the reading application.  In the case of use for SPF (using either TXT or SPF RRs) the strings are concatenated together without spaces as described below.  Reassembly by other applications of multiple strings stored in TXT records might work differently. 3.1.3. Multiple Strings in a Single DNS record As defined in [RFC1035] sections 3.3.14 and 3.3, a single text DNS record (either TXT or SPF RR types) can be composed of more than one string. If a published record contains multiple strings, then the record MUST be treated as if those strings are concatenated together without adding spaces. For example: IN TXT "v=spf1 .... first" "second string..." MUST be treated as equivalent to IN TXT "v=spf1 .... firstsecond string..." SPF or TXT records containing multiple strings are useful in constructing records that would exceed the 255-byte maximum length of a string within a single TXT or SPF RR record. EXAMPLE text = "v=spf1 ip4:199.15.212.0/22 ip4:72.3.185.0/24 ip4:72.32.154.0/24 ip4:72.32.217.0/24 ip4:72.32.243.0/24 ip4:94.236.119.0/26  ip4:37.188.97.188/32 ip4:185.28.196.0/22 ~all“ text = "v=spf1 ip4:199.15.212.0/22“ " ip4:72.3.185.0/24 ip4:72.32.154.0/24 ip4:72.32.217.0/24" " ip4:72.32.243.0/24 ip4:94.236.119.0/26" " ip4:37.188.97.188/32 ip4:185.28.196.0/22 ~all" Null Records in the SPF Record A record that is NULL or that does not exist will break an SPF record.  Syntax within the record is very important, if there are extra spaces between mechanisms it will count as NULL. EXAMPLE text = "v=spf1 ip4:199.15.212.0/22 “ <- accurate text = "v=spf1 ip4: 199.15.212.0/22 “ <- NULL (NOTE the space between IP4: and the IP) Repetitive Records in the SPF Record - Void Lookups If there are too many repetitive mechanisms in the SPF record, including records that cascade (for example when using "include:") the record will break. There is a MAX of 2 void look ups in an SPF record.  More than that and the record will break.  This prevents SPF records from being used in Denial of Service style attacks. Validation Tools SPF checker, syntax validator and SPF tester http://www.kitterman.com/spf/validate.html SPF checker http://vamsoft.com/support/tools/spf-policy-tester SPF validator http://vamsoft.com/support/tools/spf-syntax-validator CIDR Calculator http://www.subnet-calculator.com/cidr.php Nslookup http://network-tools.com/nslook/ SPF creation wizard http://www.microsoft.com/mscorp/safety/content/technologies/senderid/wizard/ Common SPF errors http://www.openspf.org/FAQ/Common_mistakes SPF syntax definitions http://www.openspf.org/SPF_Record_Syntax
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Setting an email to "operational" does the following No unsubscribe link automatically added Email will be sent to leads set to Unsubscribed Email will be sent to leads set to Marketing Suspended   Note - when sending an operational message, Unsubscribed and Marketing Suspended leads will still be included in the "blocked from email" count on the schedule tab of the campaign.   When is it OK to use the operational setting?   Sending marketing email to unsubscribed addresses is illegal. For this reason, you should be extremely careful to only use this setting in extremely limited circumstances. Using this setting incorrectly violates Marketo's Terms of Service, and most antispam laws. There may be legal consequences for using this setting incorrectly. Good uses of the operational setting fall into two categories: Transactional messages Relationship messages   What's a transactional message? A transactional message is part of a transaction that a lead has initiated and you are responding to. Here's some examples of transactional messages: Receipts for purchases Registration confirmations Download links in response to form fill-outs Requested assets (whitepapers, spec sheets, etc.)   What's a relationship message? A relationship message describes something that affects your business relationship with the lead. Here's some examples of relationship messages: Downtime notifications Changes to terms of service Recall notices End of service notifications   Operational messages should not contain any marketing content at all. In other words, do not use the operational setting to send a message that contains a receipt and a promotion, only a receipt.
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Issue Description You have a lead that is marked as Email Suspended and you are not sure whether they can receive Marketo emails or not.   Issue Resolution When emails bounce as spam, the lead that bounced is set to "Email Suspended." "Email Suspended" is a historical field.  A more accurate name for this field would probably be "This email was suspended at some point in its history."  The actual suspension only lasts 24 hours. To see if the lead is currently suspended, check the timestamp on the 'Email Suspended' field.  If it is more than 24 hours ago, the lead is not currently suspended and can receive email from your Marketo instance.  However, the "Email Suspended" flag will remain on the lead record for the purposes of future troubleshooting.  It is not possible to set "Email Suspended" to "false" once it has been set to "true."  The "Email Suspended Cause" field will provide the bounce message associated with the most recent spam bounce. Is this article helpful ? YesNo
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Overview   A blocklist is a database of IP addresses or domains that have been associated with the sending of unsolicited commercial email or spam.  Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and business email networks use information from blocklists to filter out unwanted email.  As a result there can be a drop in inbox delivery rates or overall delivery rates if the IPs or domains involved with sending email are listed on a blocklist. Marketo’s Email Delivery and Compliance team monitors blocklist activity on our IPs and domains daily. When we are alerted to a listing we reach out to the blocklist, attempt to identify the sender that triggered it, and work with the blocklist organization to get the listing resolved. There are thousands of blocklists out there most will not have a significant impact on your delivery rates. Below we have compiled a list of the blpcklists that our customers most commonly encounter. Tier 1 Blocklist Spamhaus​ Impact: Spamhaus is the only blocklist that we categorize as a tier 1 for a reason: it has by far the greatest impact on delivery of all of the blocklists. It is the most well-respected and widely used blocklist in the world. A listing at Spamhaus will have a negative effect on your ability to deliver emails to your customer’s inbox and can cause bounce rates of over 50%.  Evidence suggests that most of the top North American ISPs use Spamhaus to inform blocking decisions. How it works: Unlike many blocklists, Spamhaus lists senders manually. This means that they are proactively watching sender activity, collecting data, and basing the listings on a number of variables. Most commonly senders are listed for mailing to spam trap addresses that Spamhaus owns. Sometimes Spamhaus will list senders based on recipient feedback as well. Next steps: Our team monitors closely for Spamhaus listings. When we see a listing we immediately alert the customer and contact Spamhaus to start the remediation process. Listings last until Spamhaus is satisfied that the offending sender has taken the appropriate steps to mitigate the problem.   Tier 2 Blocklists SpamCop Impact: SpamCop is not used by any of the major North American ISPs to inform blocking decisions but it makes it to the Tier 2 list because it can have a significant impact on B2B email campaigns. How it works: SpamCop lists IPs for one of two reasons: Either the email hit SpamCop spam trap addresses OR A SpamCop user has reported the email unwanted. Most of SpamCop’s spam traps are previously valid addresses that have not been active for 12 months or longer. Next steps: SpamCop is a dynamic blocklist, listings typically resolve themselves within one business day.  There is no action you will need to take to action the delisting with SpamCop, the Privacy Team researches every SpamCop listing and will request delistings when an alert is received that an IP is listed. If your email activity triggered a SpamCop listing it likely means that you have a list management problem that should be addressed. Manitu Impact: Manitu is a German blocklist and has a wide footprint in Europe.  Email senders with European audiences tend to encounter this blocklist most frequently. Manitu is not used by North American ISPs to inform blocklist decisions but if you’re sending to Europe a listing could be problematic. How it works: Listings are automatically activated when a sender mails to a Manitu owned spam trap address. Next steps: The Privacy Team researches and requests delisting when an alert is received that a Marketo IP is listed.  By working with this blocklist the Privacy Team is usually able to identify the customer and let them know that email activity from their subscription triggered a listing. Because Manitu operates solely on the use of spam trap addresses, getting listed by Manitu is a clear indication that senders need to audit their mailing lists.   Tier 3 Blocklists      SORBS   Impact: The impact of a listing at SORBS is very minimal. How it works: SORBS uses several methods to identify potential spammers. Most of their lists use spam traps to identify problematic senders. But SORBS will also list a sender based on their own user complaints, if SORBS administrators have received spam from the sender, or if they identify other high-level sending behavior patterns characteristic of spammers. Next steps: The Privacy Team monitors SORBS activity and makes delisting requests for Marketo IPs as necessary. Oftentimes, SORBS will refuse to delist within a certain timeframe based on the severity of the issue.  Sometimes this can be up to several weeks.   UCEPROTECT Impact: The impact of a listing at UCEPROTECT is very minimal, though the blocklist has a greater footprint in Europe. The organization does not have a good reputation in the industry because they charge senders to request delisting. How it works: UCEPROTECT lists IPs that send mail to their spam trap addresses. Next steps: We ignore these listings because the only way to have them removed is to pay. The pay-to-delist model is not well respected in the email industry so UCEPROTECT has a very limited reach.   ISP Blocklists   Some ISPs have their own blocklists that they use to inform blocking decisions. A few examples are Comcast and Verizon. If your IP is being blocked by one of these networks, and those networks have a large presence in your lists, a block of this kind could have a noticeable negative impact on delivery. Marketo monitors for this type of ISP specific blocklisting and the the Privacy Team works to resolve these as soon as possible. Usually blocks at Comcast and Verizon are resolved within less than 24 hours of a delisting request.   Additional Resources: Blocklist Deep Dive​ Abuse Report Deep Dive​ What is a spamtrap, or spam trap, and why does it matter? Blocklist remediation Blocklist resolution flowchart Successful lead reconfirmation What is a blocklist?
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A blocklist is a database that uses certain pieces of information to determine if an IP or domain is sending messages that could be considered spam. There are hundreds of blocklists out there, though only a handful of them are used widely enough to have a major impact on your email delivery rates. Blocklists are tools that are used by ISPs to inform decisions on whether or not to place a message in the end user’s inbox. If an IP or domain is on a blocklist, ISPs that use that blocklist to inform inbox decisions will not accept mail from that IP. Most blocklists are dynamic, meaning that they will delist automatically after a given period of time or when the sender’s email statistics improve. An IP will be included on a blocklist if certain criteria are met, and these criteria vary from blocklist to blocklist. Spamhaus, the world’s most well repudiated and widely used blocklist, has a great graphic that explains how their blocklist feeds information to ISPs and what happens from there. While blocklists use a number of methods to determine whether or not an IP is sending messages that could be considered spam, two of the most common are spamtraps addresses and user feedback. Spamtraps are email addresses that are not meant to receive email. Some spamtraps were created by anti-spam professionals and were never meant to receive email, while others are simply old invalid addresses that have been repurposed. You can read more about spam traps here: What Is a Spamtrap and Why Do They Matter?. Blocklists also rely heavily on feedback from users that tell them that a particular IP or sender is sending spam. We have to be strict about our Email Use and Anti-Spam Policy because in the rare event that one of our customers triggers a blocklist, any customer on the same IP range will be affected. To check if an IP is blocklisted, use this tool. If you have found that you are listed on a blocklist, please see this article, Blocklist Remediation, for a path to resolution. To learn more about specific blocklists, please visit our guide to the top blocklists, Top Blocklists – What You Need to Know.
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Quick points: *Spamtraps are addresses owned by antispam organizations *Emailing a spamtrap (usually) gets your IP or domain blocklisted *Maintain current, direct opt-in with an active lead database to avoid this What is a spam trap or spamtrap?   A spam trap, or spamtrap is an email address secretly owned by an antispam organization that is used to detect spam. Antispam organizations do not sign up for mailing lists, so they consider any email sent to these addresses to be spam. Once email is sent to the spamtrap, the antispam organization that owns this address will blocklist the IP that sent the email (or, less often, domains that are linked in the message).   Email administrators purchase subscriptions to various blacklists, and use the lists to block all incoming email from listed IPs or containing listed domains. From the marketer’s perspective, this can mean a high number of bounced emails leading to low lead engagement, and ultimately to weak revenue performance.   There are two types of spamtraps – pristine traps, and repurposed/recycled traps. A pristine trap is an email address that was never used by a person. A repurposed trap is an email address that once belonged to someone but is no longer a valid address; these addresses will bounce as bad addresses for at least six months before an antispam organization will turn them into live traps.   How can a spamtrap get into my Marketo lead database? Purchased data   Purchased data is unreliable. The antispam world does not like the use of purchased data so antispam administrators have made a concerted effort to get spamtrap addresses into the databases of data vendors. While data vendors may say they provide opt-in data in reality consent should be direct to your company. Sending unsolicited email is prohibited by the Marketo Terms of Use because this practice has a high risk of causing blocklist issues that can destroy deliverability for multiple Marketo customers. To avoid spam traps get direct opt-in before sending email. If you have purchased data in the past we recommend setting any inactive purchased leads to marketing suspended or simply removing them from your database. Old data Repurposed traps are email addresses that were once valid but are now owned by an antispam organization. This can happen when a company goes out of business; expired domains are often purchased by antispam organizations. Sometimes a company that has a direct partnership with an antispam organization will allow email addresses of former employees or users to become spamtraps. Because antispam organizations will generally make sure future spam traps return a bounce as bad addresses for at least six months before they become spam traps you can prevent repurposed traps in your database by emailing remaining engaged with everyone in your database at least once every six months. Avoid “wake the dead” campaigns to addresses you have not contacted in more than six months. Unconfirmed form entries People can unintentionally enter spamtrap addresses into forms either by making a typo or by intentionally using a fake email address that happens to be a spamtrap. If you use single opt-in, you may add spamtraps to your mailing list. This is more likely to happen if you are a B2C company or if someone thinks they can get whitepapers or free trials simply by filling out a form with made-up information.   How can I identify spamtrap addresses?   Spamtrap addresses are considered trade secrets by the antispam organizations. They do not share these addresses because their goal is for senders to change their mailing practices rather than to simply remove spamtraps from their mailing lists.   That said, one thing we do know about spamtraps is that they tend to be automated processes and do not engage. Spamtraps do not click links. You can use smart list filters to identify inactive leads in Marketo.   How can I prevent spamtraps in my database? Maintain active, direct opt-in for all leads. Don’t purchase data (to grow your list, sponsor events, use list rental services that send the first message for you, or use co-branded content that sends you only good leads) Email everyone you want to email at least once every six months Don’t add old data directly to your mailing list (if you need to, add in small batches and send a welcome email with a slightly different subject to each batch) Regularly clean your database of inactive leads Grant access to assets such as free trials and whitepapers as email links to discourage intentional use of fake email addresses on forms Use scripting on your forms to identify potential typos Is this article helpful ? YesNo  
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Issue You see a record in the database has something similar to the following Email Suspended Cause: "554- Your access to this mail system has been rejected due to the sending MTA's poor reputation. If you believe that this failure is in error, please contact the intended recipient via alternate means." Solution The 554 error is generated by a hard bounce due to a spam block. It is possible that one of the sending IP addresses used may have been on a temporary blacklist the day of the attempted send. This happens while using shared IPs when another Marketo instance using the same IP hits a spam trap, putting the IP on a blacklist for 24 hours. This error can also happen to users on a dedicated IP if they hit a spam trap with one of their email sends.        
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At Marketo it is a violation of our Email Use Policy to send cold emails to purchased email addresses.   Adobe's Acceptable Use Policy Compliance with this Acceptable Use Policy (“AUP”) protects the interests of individuals using the Internet, the reputation and goodwill of Adobe, it's subsidiaries, and that of those using Adobe services.  Ensuring the utmost standards of email marketing is our collective responsibility.   Prohibition against Unsolicited Email/Spam: Customers must refrain from directly or indirectly sending, transmitting, distributing, or delivering: (i) Unsolicited bulk email ("spam" or "spamming”) i.e., emails to persons who have not consented to the receipt of such emails by providing their email address in a manner from which consent to receive email may be reasonably implied. (ii) Email to an address obtained via Internet harvesting or other surreptitious methods (e.g., scraping, renting, purchased list, co-registration, affiliate marketing, incomplete or old lists; or email appending).  Adobe defines email appending as a marketing practice that involves taking known Customer Data (name, address, etc.) and matching it against a third-party vendor’s database to obtain email addresses. (iii) Email that generates abuse/spam complaints or spam trap hits resulting in IP/Domain block listing or other deliverability issues that could have material impact on Adobe or its client’s reputation.   Inclusion of Opt-Out Provision: Customers must ensure all commercial emails sent include a provision for recipients to "opt-out" or revoke permission of receiving any future messages from Customer.  To that end, Customer agrees: (i) To use the unsubscribe tools provided by Adobe; or (ii) To have procedures in place to allow a recipient to easily opt-out, such as: (a) a clear appended link for recipients to easily opt-out of receiving future messages, or (b) Instructions to reply with the word "Remove" in the subject line; and (iii) Unsubscribes should be removed without delay with no future messages being sent unless future permission is granted.   General Prohibitions Customers transmitting content through Adobe services must not misrepresent or obscure their identity in any way or mislead recipients through use of invalid or forged headers, misleading subject lines or content, or domain names not owned or controlled by Customer. Customer must not transmit any messages through Adobe services with content that is threatening, abusive, harassing, defamatory, deceptive, false, fraudulent, vulgar, obscene, indecent, or illegal. Customer is strictly prohibited from transmitting or providing Adobe any sensitive information as that term may be used in applicable laws, or where no laws apply, individuals’ financial account information, sexual preferences, medical or health information, and/or personal information of children protected under any child protection laws.  Notwithstanding the foregoing, if a Marketo Engage Customer is regulated by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”), has a subscription to encrypt Customer Data at rest, and has signed a Business Associate Addendum with Adobe or its affiliate for its use of Marketo Engage, then Customer is prohibited from transmitting a subset of health information, including medical or health records or information reflecting the payment of such treatment.   AUP Enforcement and Updates Violations of the AUP will be deemed a material risk to the continued normal operation of Adobe services and may result in immediate revocation of Customer’s license or subscription to use the applicable services.  Adobe may review relevant data to determine Customers’ compliance with this AUP.   The full text of the policy is here: https://www.adobe.com/legal/terms/aup.html Is there ever an acceptable use for purchased data?  Yes. The Marketo Compliance Team supports the following uses for purchased data: Generate personalized URLs and send to purchased leads by postal mail Use purchased data to fill in additional details about leads who only provide an email address at the time of opt in - this makes for great targeting! When operating in a small market of known leads, purchased data can be useful for research purposes to track information about your target market Purchased leads can be contacted by phone to obtain email permission   The global anti-spam community does not consider permission to be transferable, except in the following circumstances: A company is wholly acquired by a new parent company; emails sent will include the same content from new owners A division of a company - product or brand - is acquired by a new parent company; emails sent will include the same content from new owners   Both parts of the above are key. Personal data alone may not be transferred with permission intact because permission is contextual. Even in the case of an acquisition additional permission is required if the emails will include significantly different content.   To provide an illustration, when "Acme" acquired a home video camera company they acquired permission to continue to email the company's leads about selling home video cameras. That does not mean they have permission to email those people about every other product in "Acme's" portfolio. Email permission was granted to receive emails about home video products, not anything else. "Acme" could email those people and ask them to opt in to their other mailing lists, but acquiring a company does not give the new parent company the right to add the child company's opted-in leads to all their other unrelated mailing lists.   Data vendors may say the leads they sell are "opted-in," but this is not true according to the standards set forth by the global antispam community.  Even if these individuals genuinely wished for the data vendor to sell their email addresses (often demonstrably untrue), they still would not have provided direct permission to the buyer to send them email. Marketo requires that permission be direct to the sender (or that there is an existing business relationship) to send email within our Terms. Many data companies offer list rental services where the data company sends an initial message, and passes on only the information of recipients who respond to the offer.   Marketo is not the only vendor in the marketplace with this philosophy against purchased lists, it is a widely know issue that purchased lists drive delivery issues. Purchased Lists and ESPs - Word to the Wise  
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The Google Apps antispam system uses a unique means of whitelisting. Customers on shared IPs should whitelist Marketo's entire sending ranges, because we sometimes need to move customers between IPs for technical reasons. The way to whitelist a range in Google Apps is to configure a manual IP block with a pass through. G Suite enables you to specify an IP address or range of addresses within a domain, and allow messages from those addresses only. This feature is sometimes referred to as IP lock. In G Suite, you set up this feature in the Content compliance setting. IP lock is a method that readily enables an administrator to simultaneously whitelist all incoming traffic from a particular domain while equally preventing spoofing by manually defining the allowed IP ranges. The following instructions are particularly useful with domains that do not have an SPF record and/or use third party applications to legitimately spoof their address. Setting up IP lock with the Content compliance setting includes three separate procedures: Adding the domain, defining the allowed IP range, and setting the correct disposition and NDR. See this page of Google documentation for more information: Enforce 'IP lock' in G Suite - G Suite Administrator Help Instead of using a CIDR range, this interface asks for the first and last IPs in the given range. Here are ours: 199.15.212.0 - 199.15.212.255 199.15.213.0 - 199.15.213.255 199.15.214.0 - 199.15.214.255 199.15.215.0 - 199.15.215.255 192.28.146.0 - 192.28.146.255 192.28.147.0 - 192.28.147.255 94.236.119.0 - 94.236.119.63 185.28.196.0 - 185.28.196.255 103.237.104.0 - 103.237.104.255 103.237.105.0 - 103.237.105.255 130.248.172.0 -  130.248.172.255 130.248.173.0 -  130.248.173.255 Is this article helpful ? YesNo
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  What is a Blocklist? Can I Still Send My Emails, or Are You Blocking Me from Sending? What Is a Spamtrap and Why Do They Matter? Can You Give Me the Spam Trap Address That Triggered the Blocklist So I Can Remove It from My Database? Can You Give Me More Information regarding the Blocklist Issue? What Is the Quarantined IP Range? I Sent This Email Campaign a While Ago. Why Am I Only Getting Notification of the Blocklist Issue Now, and Am I Still Blocklisted? The Blocklist Notification Went to the Wrong Email Address. Why Was It Sent to That Address? Which blocklists should I be concerned about? - Top Blocklists – What You Need to Know How do blocklist issues get resolved? What steps do I need to take to resolve the blacklist issue? - Blocklist Remediation      
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  This is a article attached image Upon signing a contract with Marketo you are provisioned a Marketo instance and a Support Service. There are four different types of Support Services which are available to meet different customer support needs: Online (Legacy) Business  or PREMIER SUPPORT BUSINESS (Legacy) Premier or PREMIER SUPPORT ENTERPRISE (Legacy) Elite or PREMIER SUPPORT ELITE Each Support Service has a different Service Level Target (SLT). An SLT is the amount of time Marketo Support targets to make first contact with you after a support case has been submitted. SLTs differ for each Support Service and priority level. Priority levels range from Priority P1 to Priority P4. Here are the SLTs and priority levels for each Support Service:   Priority Online (Legacy) Business PREMIER SUPPORT BUSINESS (Legacy) Premier PREMIER SUPPORT ENTERPRISE (Legacy) Elite PREMIER SUPPORT ELITE P1 1 hour 1 hour 1 hour 30 minutes 30 minutes 30 minutes 15 minutes P2 4 hours 3 hours 2 hours 2 hours 1 hour 2 hours 30 minutes P3 6 hours 5 hours 4 hours 4 hours 2 hours 2 hours 1 hour P4 3 days 1 day 1 day 1 day 1 day 1 day 1 day   Here are the descriptions for each priority level: Priority Description P1 Mission Critical:  Core business function down or potential loss of mission critical data P2 Urgent:  Major feature or workflow is not functioning. Mission critical workflow and majority of user community is not blocked P3 Important:  Normal usability or task completion is impacted but functional, or workaround is available P4 Minor:  Minor issue requiring a correction. Normal workflow is not impacted   Find more information About Support here!  
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Issue If your IT department or a client asks for your Marketo dedicated sending IP address in order to whitelist your marketing emails, here is how you can find it.     Solution Your Marketo instance's dedicated IP address can be found by sending yourself a live version of one of your Marketo emails, then checking the message headers for the IP address that it was sent from.  It should also be included in the original documentation that Marketo's deliverability team would have provided you when the dedicated IP was set up.  If you are unable to locate the IP address in the emails, or are unable to find your original documentation, please reach out to Marketo Support and we can look it up for you.   Who This Solution Applies To Customers with a dedicated sending IP
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Issue You had an email send and are now seeing in an Email Performance Report that there are Pending emails, a few hours after initiating the program/campaign.     Solution "Pending" generally means that Marketo is attempting to deliver a message. Marketo will try to send a message, but can receive a temporary bounce (essentially "Thanks, try again later"). When that happens, the mail status is set to pending while we retry. We will try to send the message several times over the next 24 hours (36 to AOL) before we accept that the message will not be delivered and change the status to "bounced". Occasionally, other Marketo server issues can cause emails to be stuck in Pending.  If all the emails in Pending are from consumer email addresses, such as Yahoo, Hotmail, or QQ.com, then we are probably just waiting for the receiving server to accept the message.  However, if the pending emails are to a variety of different business domains, please contact Marketo support and we can investigate.
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No, unfortunately we are unable to tell you what the spam trap address is. We don’t even know it ourselves! Spam trap addresses are proprietary to the blocklists that own them. Anti-spam professionals use spam trap addresses to track unsolicited emails. If a spam trap is known by the offending sender, the sender could simply remove the spam trap address from their lists and never actually address the data problem that caused that spam trap address to be included in their lists to begin with. Instead of asking what the spam trap address is, try to identify the source of the trap address and eliminate bad data sources from your mailing lists. You should be able to identify the email campaign that caused the blocklist issue, so you should start with those lists. To narrow it down and identify the problematic data source, you should consider the following: Have you recently added any new leads or new lead sources? What is the source of these leads? Any purchased or appended email addresses should be removed, because these data sources are often the source of newly introduced spamtraps. In addition, using purchased or appended email addresses for mailing is a violation of Adobe’s Email Use and Anti-Spam Policy. Have you added any older leads that have not been mailed to recently? Some email providers will turn an email address into a spam trap after a year of inactivity. If you have a list of addresses that has not been mailed in a year or more, this list should be removed. Does your system use any custom fields to indicate customer status, event attendance, recent contact with your sales team, or other forms of engagement? If so, take advantage of this and isolate the inactive or non-responsive segments of your database using all of the activity data you have available. Is there anything about this specific mailing that makes it different compared to your previous email campaigns? Did you send any other mail on the same day? If so, you should compare the recipient lists. Think you have narrowed in on the problem? Check out our guide to blocklist remediation to find out what to do with that bad list and complete the remediation program.   Additional Resources: What is a spamtrap, or spam trap, and why does it matter? What is a blocklist? How does Marketo respond to blocklisting and spam notifications? Top blocklists - What you need to know Blocklist Remediation Successful Reconfirmation Blocklist Deep Dive Blocklist FAQ   Is this article helpful ? YesNo  
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When a customer triggers a blacklisting on Marketo's shared IP range that customer is moved to a set of IPs we call the quarantined IP range.  We do this to protect the health of our shared network and ensure the best deliverability possible for all of our customers on that network.   If you have received a Blocklist Notification from Marketo reporting that you have triggered a blocklisting your Marketo account is now in the quarantined IP range.   While you are in the quarantined range it is possible that you may experience a slight decrease in your deliverability rates. The reason for this is that you are now sending from a range made up of senders that have also caused other blocklist issues. All customers have received a notice of the listing and are in the process of repairing their database.   There are two ways to be removed from the quarantined IP range: Follow the steps outlined in our Blocklist Remediation article. Be sure to fill out the form referenced in the email alert to indicate that you have taken steps to mitigate the issue. Demonstrate clean sending behavior for 3 months. We remove senders from the quarantined IP range if they have not triggered any new listings in 3 months.   To ensure your best deliverability rates blocklist issues should be addressed right away to prevent further damage to your sending reputation. Furthermore, if no action is taken to improve list hygiene the issue will likely recur. Marketo's Privacy Team strongly recommend following the Blocklist Remediation steps.   Additional Resources: Blocklist Deep Dive​  
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We manage our network to provide our customers with the highest server availability and best deliverability possible.  Marketo Engage has a strong anti-spam policy and a team that handles blocklist notifications in our IP space and spam complaints.  We also cooperate with most major anti-spam providers and ISPs.  In addition, we maintain feedback loops for many of the most popular email providers.  For more information on feedback loops and ISPs with whom we have this arrangement, click here . Blocklistings are usually caused by sending mail to a spam trap email address.  For an explanation on what causes blocklisting, click here . When we receive notification of a blocklisting, we react in two ways.  First, we go through the procedures to remove the listing from that blocklist as soon as possible.  Second, we determine (if possible) which of our customers caused the blocklisting and work with them to improve their mailing lists to prevent a reoccurrence in the future.  This is usually a cooperative process, most frequently, a review of mailing policies and strategic pruning of a customer’s lead database will return them to best practices.   Blocklists: Frequently Asked Questions   Is this article helpful ? YesNo  
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    Overview Add Leads to Static Lists Use Custom Fields Overview Lead records have two primary components – lead attributes and activity logs. Lead attributes are the fields and field values within the lead record. For example, Job Title is a lead attribute. Lead Name is a lead attribute. Activity logs record the actions Marketo or the lead themselves have taken. For example, sending an email to a lead is an activity that would show in the activity log. If the lead opens the email or visits a tracked page, those activities would show in the activity log as well.   Activities in the activity log are only retained for 90 days, 25 months, or 37 if you have purchased the premium data retention option. The official Marketo Data Retention Policy can be found here:  Marketo Activities Data Retention Policy   The main way to store activity data beyond the Data Retention Policy timeframe is to use the Bulk Extract API. There are two other ways you can keep a reference of these activities after the end of the Data Retention period, and they can be referenced within the Marketo UI. This article will show you how that can be done.     Add Leads to Static Lists Static lists will retain lead membership even if the activity of adding the lead to the list has been removed. This will let you have lists dedicated to specific criteria that would otherwise be removed after the data retention time period has been passed.   For example, Smart Campaign membership history is not retained after 25 months. If you are searching for members of a Smart Campaign, but a lead first became a member of the Smart Campaign more than 25 months ago, the search results would not include that lead.   An easy way to work around that is to add your leads to a static list as part of the flow of the campaign. When creating your Smart Campaign, create a new static list with the same corresponding name (makes it easier to identify later). When building the flow of your campaign, add the "Add to List" flow step so that all leads going through the campaign will be logged on the list.         Use Custom Fields Lead attributes and their field values are not affected by the Data Retention Policy. Use Smart Campaigns to populate custom fields with values based on activities your leads take. This will allow you to filter leads by these lead attributes that are not affected by the Data Retention Policy. A side benefit to this is that it is faster to search by lead attributes than by searching through lead activity logs.   Example: This approach can work for many different activities, but let’s use form fill outs as an example.   Let’s say you want to be able to identify leads who have been very active and have filled out more than 5 forms over their lifecycle. You could use the filter “Filled Out Form” with the “Min. Number of Times” constraint set to 5. However, if one of those forms filled out occurred more than 25 months ago, the filter would only be able to access 4 form fill activities in the activity log. Therefore, the lead would not pass the filter.   Instead of using the “Filled Out Form” filter, set up a Smart Campaign to write to custom fields that show you how many forms they’ve filled out, and when the first one was. Here’s how to do it:   1. Create two new custom fields in Marketo, one Score Field, and the second a Date Field.   2. Create a new Smart Campaign   3. Add the trigger “Fills Out Form” set to “is any” to the Campaign Smart List     4. Add these two Flow Steps to the Campaign Flow: Flow Step 1 : “Change Score” Score Field Name: your score field name Change: +1   Flow Step 2 : “Change Data Value” Add Choice to Flow Step Choice 1: If “your score field name”  “is empty” Attribute “your score field name” New Value: {{system.date}} Default Choice: Do Nothing       This campaign will listen for any time a lead fills out a form, add +1 to your score field, and if it’s the very first form they’ve ever filled out, it will log the date of when it was done. If the lead has ever filled out a form in the past, there will already be a date value in the date field, so the flow choice would just skip over it and do nothing.       Results You’ll See: With the original goal of identifying leads who have filled out more than 5 forms you’ll be able to filter for leads that have filled out at least 5 forms. In addition, this campaign will let you search for leads based on when they had filled out their very first form, regardless of how long ago it was. Since it’s stored in a lead field, it’s a lead attribute that is not affected by the Data Retention Policy at all.        
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Issue You want to set up a DKIM key on one of your domains or subdomains, but another service has a DKIM key already set up on the selector/domain combo.     Solution There are two approaches that can be taken here: The first is to get copies of the public and private key that are in use by the other service and provide that to our Support team. We will partner with our Deliverability team to work to process the request to have these keys copied into Marketo, so that both services use the same key.   The second option is to have a custom DKIM selector implemented. For example, there is already a DKIM key set up on m1._domainkey.unicorn.com. We can set up a key for m2._domainkey.unicorn.com or another custom value in place of m1. Let Support know what value you'd like to use for your custom selector and we will partner with our Deliverability team to implement the request. Afterwards, you'll be able to set up DKIM  as detailed in documentation: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Set+up+a+Custom+DKIM+Signature Once the request has been submitted, please allow 3-5 business days for Marketo to process the request. Marketo's Support team will contact you when the request has been completed.
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