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Note: This post was originally written by Danny Essner, who oversees Demand Generation and Marketing Operations at MediaMathhttp://launchpoint.marketo.com/mediamath/1553-terminalone-marketing-operating-system/. This post is the first in a series dedicated to exploring how B2B marketers can use programmatic technology to effectively reach their target buyer personas, and move them down the path to purchase. For the past five years B2B marketers have been obsessed with marketing automation. More specifically, B2B marketers have relied heavily on email lead nurturing to help them address their key challenges, including an increasingly complex sales cycle, sophisticated buyers who complete 60% or more of their research and purchase decisions before reaching out to a sales person, and the need to deliver both a higher quantity as well as better quality of qualified leads to its sales team. Marketing automation platforms are great, but the term “marketing automation” is a misnomer. Many of the so-called marketing automation platforms are, in reality, email automation platforms. Marketing automation implies a cross-channel solution that automates and optimizes across the multiple key channels marketers use to find and engage prospects and customers. And while email is important, it is not the only channel B2B marketers should use to engage new and existing customers through their buyers’ journeys. Now, don’t get me wrong, I am a huge fan of these automation platforms.   I believe in their power and have been using them for the past eight years. My concern is that marketers who have invested in these platforms have become overly reliant on email as the one channel they use to nurture leads and engage existing customers. According to eMarketer, B2B email performance is quite poor, averaging ~20% open rates and ~1.5% click through rates. Research shows that B2B buyers use a wide variety of tools in product/solution research. They research online, scour social media channels, and consume videos. A true full-funnel lead nurture strategy goes beyond email to include your website, social channels and the web. With this approach in mind, here are three recommendations B2B marketers can employ to expand beyond email: 1. Develop and Execute a Multi-Channel Lead Nurture Strategy Complement your email lead nurture programs with display advertising, social and website campaigns. As with email nurturing, messages delivered through these channels must be properly sequenced and relevant to each customer based on where they are in the buyer’s journey. 2. Create Message Alignment Across all Channels To realize the benefit of a multi-channel nurturing strategy, all channels must support one another in propelling the customer through their journey. Your messages must be aligned and consistent so that you’re always delivering the right message to the right customer at the right time. This means that the messaging for each channel must be specific to that channels, and all channels must be aware of where the customer is in their journey. 3. Build Out Your Marketing Stack Beyond Just Marketing Automation To nurture customers across multiple channels concurrently, automatically and at scale, B2B marketers must build out a robust marketing stack. B2B marketers can do just that by leveraging tools that engage customers across all relevant channels. This does not mean that, as a B2B marketer, you must scrap you existing marketing automation solution. Rather, you can complement your email-centric automation platform with a holistic, extensible cross-channel component to create the technology stack you need to properly engage customers through all relevant channels – email, website, social, video, display and mobile – in a consistent, synchronized fashion. It’s time to graduate beyond email alone. Let’s all adopt true marketing automation, where we automate the personalization of all messages across all channels.
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Note: This guide was provided by our partner, Cake. Topic: Mobile, Mobile, Mobile. It is important for every marketer. Understanding mobile analytics is still a challenge for most companies. This white paper aims to outline the new and emerging challenges facing those hoping to monetize the incredible potential of mobile tracking techniques.
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Note: This guide was provided by our LaunchPoint partner, Cake. Intro:  When it comes to where and how to invest their digital advertising resources, today’s marketers have more choices than ever. From display banners and mobile apps to email promotions to social media campaigns, the options available for engaging with consumers are diverse, varied and continually evolving. But while digital opportunities may be numerous, marketing budgets have limits. Now more than ever, decision makers need ways to quickly assess what’s working and what’s not so they can intelligently allocate available spend. This requires more than instinct and intuition. Data that provides accurate, rich, real-time insight into digital campaign performance is needed. Thanks to the explosion of data generated online, a goldmine of performance-related information is now available to digital advertisers. But with so much to track, organize and analyze, making sense of it all can be challenging. Transforming “Big Data” into “Smart Data” that guides fact-based decision making is the key to digital marketing success. Download the doc and read more)
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Note: This white paper was provided by our LaunchPoint partner, Cake. Topic:  Using technology to make more profit by selling your leads at the best price.
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Note: This White Paper was provided by our LaunchPoint partner, Cake. This guide explores how multi-touch marketing attribution can increase the success of your digital advertising campaigns.
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Jeremy Builder is a Brand Builder, Keynote Speaker, and president of Sticky Branding—a brand building agency. Jeremy helps companies stand out, drive sales, and grow Sticky Brands. He is the author of Sticky Branding: 12.5 Principles to Stand Out, Attract Customers and Grow an Incredible Brand. Did you know that the best time to initiate a client relationship is upwards of three years before your services are needed? Companies with sticky brands build relationships early and often. They don’t wait for a customer to accidentally come across them in a Google search—they are proactive. They are purposeful. They build and scale relationships with their target market long before their expertise is needed. Why? Because when your customers know you, like you, and trust you, they will seek out your brand and choose it first. This is an ideal sales position, because it creates a First Choice Advantage. Most of your market isn’t buying … yet We are all well versed in how to handle a customer with a specific need. Even if you’re not a professional salesperson, you can sell to someone who needs your expertise. The challenge is that only a small percentage of companies in your marketplace are proactively shopping and looking for your expertise. Approximately 3% of your market is buying at any given time, the rest is not. I call this the 3% Rule—it’s a model to segment your market into buying groups, and it looks like this: 3% are active buyers. At the very top of the triangle is the active buyer group. These are the people and companies that have a need and are actively shopping for vendors. They want to make a purchase in the next thirty to ninety days—these are sales leads. 7% intend to change. The next segment is made up of passive buyers. They have a need, but aren’t proactively searching for options. A well-timed cold call or marketing campaign can be very effective for this segment, because you are delivering a solution before they start shopping. 30% have a need, but not enough to act. This group are not buyers. They may look like buyers and act like buyers, but they won’t make a commitment. They have other priorities. Until the need becomes more pressing, they won’t make a purchase. 30% do not have a need. This segment of the market does not have a need for your products and services, and they are not receptive to marketing messages. They may have just made a purchase, they may be too small, or they may not be ready for your services. 30% are not interested in your company. The bottom of the triangle represents a group of companies that do not fit your brand. Basically, these companies are never going to choose you. They may be loyal to the competition. They may have had a bad experience with your firm. They may use alternative options. Don’t sweat it. Just recognize that this dynamic occurs, and your brand can’t be all things to all people. Identify your optimal mode of marketing There are two modes of marketing: Marketing to people and companies who have a need for your services right now Marketing to people who don’t have a need for your services, but will some day The first mode is often where companies feel the most confident, and it receives the lion’s share of the marketing budget. The challenge in this mode is that much of your marketing investment is ineffective, because it falls on deaf ears. Paul Emond, CEO of Versature , sums up the situation nicely, “When people aren’t in the buying mode, they don’t want to be sold to.” The second mode of marketing is the opportunity. Rather than trying to engage people when they have a need, engage them earlier , when they are in the Lower 90%. Establish the relationship and develop rapport before they’re ready to buy. Create an opportunity where your customers know, like, and trust your company long before they have a need. That way they’ll skip right over the inbound marketing messages , and call your company first when they have a need. All it takes are small acts of generosity Sticky brands engage their market early and often. They focus a significant portion of their marketing resources on the Lower 90 Percent, building relationships, and securing their place as their customers’ first call when they’re ready to buy. Jim Gilbert’s Wheels and Deals , for example, builds relationships with small acts of generosity. Every year the company ships thousands of personalized birthday gifts to their current customers, past customers, and prospects. In 2013 they sent over 12,000 birthday gifts! The gifts are custom designed. Each year the company comes up with something new, and the response is incredible.Wheels and Deals receives letters, emails, and calls all the time from people saying, “Thank you". It turns out that for many people, birthdays get overlooked, but Wheels and Deals never forgets. These gifts are sent with no expectation—there is no call to action, no marketing message—it’s simply a gift. And they arrive each year like clockwork. But the impact is powerful. When people enter the market looking for a new car, they call Wheels and Deals first. As a result, the company has grown over the past fourteen years into one of the largest independent used car dealerships in Canada. Sticky Brands are built in the Lower 90 Percent Any company can develop lead generation programs for the Top 10 Percent of the 3% Rule. They can also implement Google AdWords programs and search engine optimization. But very few companies focus on the lower 90%. Sticky brands are built in the lower 90%, because they understand the importance of building relationships. Their brand is not based on aggressive marketing and pitching—it’s based on a personal connection, where their customers know them, like them, and trust them. That relationship separates sticky brands from average brands. When your customers know you, like you, and trust you, they will call you first. And that’s the best place to be in the buying cycle. How do you make your brand sticky? I'd love to hear what you think in the comments below. If you're interested in learning how to make your brand sticky by nurturing your customers, check out the Definitive Guide to Lead Nurturing .
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Note: Vyoma Kapur is a Sr. Marketing Programs Manager at Marketo. She’s passionate about tech, marketing and travel. In her free time, she likes hiking, canoeing and immersing in a mystery book or courtroom drama. Vyoma is from Singapore and spent a year in Norway right after college. To excel in this new model, marketers need to start by building a deep and intricate level of understanding of their customers and how marketing influences that lifecycle. Understand Your customers Based on the information available, it is worthwhile to invest time and resources to create customer personas. While demographic data is the backbone in building personas, customer behavior, transactions, needs, and motivations are all crucial in providing an enriched and holistic view of customers. Ask yourself: What channels are they engaging with and what channels are they ignoring? What products are they browsing? But wary of death by data; an information overload can be counterproductive to any exercise on trying to develop an understanding of the customers. Understand the customers’ lifecycle After you have identified personas, you have paved the way to the next step of understanding how to activate your customers—mapping out the customer lifecycle in detail. As you do this, think about: What are the current stages of a typical customer lifecycle? How can they be improved? Getting a granular view of the lifecycle , and assessing it at every point helps lay the groundwork for the next step—understanding marketing’s influence. Customers may interact with your brand differently at each stage, so looking at how they are browsing and with what devices can go a long way in charting out the lifecycle in detail. Understand marketing’s influence on the lifecycle The next step is to start a discovery process of the impact of marketing on each stage of the lifecycle. What content are your customers consuming at each stage and how are your marketing efforts directly improving their experience? Where can you help accelerate or improve their journey? Questions like these can help determine where you should be focusing your efforts or channeling your budget. These three pillars are key to creating a foundation for customer activation. To help you assess where you are today with respect to the steps I went through in this post, check out the 25 question worksheet: How to Get Started with Marketing Activation , and see how you fare!
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  If your organization invests more time and money in content marketing and your pipeline of marketing leads grows, is it safe to assume that your investment paid off? Not necessarily. Simply because two events — more investment and a bigger pipeline — happened doesn’t mean they’re related. But there is a way to find out: Use lead metrics to track and measure activity and attribute leads in your marketing automation system to specific pieces of content. Looking at how leads in various stages of your sales funnel interact with your content can help you hone your content strategy. Here’s how to do it: Campaign Tracking The simple do-it-yourself way of tying content to leads is to use campaign tracking in Salesforce and in a marketing automation platform that you’re already using. In Salesforce, a campaign is an object that tracks a user’s activity across Lead, Contact, and Opportunity objects. Creating a campaign for a piece of content lets you see when a user engages with that item (for instance, opening a newsletter, reading a blog post or downloading an asset).   Here are three key aspects of campaign tracking that help you attribute leads to specific pieces of content: Persistence: Once a lead is attributed to a campaign, the campaign mapping follows the lead even as the lead gets converted to other objects lower in the funnel such as a contact or opportunity. This lets you not only track how many leads a piece generates, but also if these leads result in further actions. Multiple Attribution: Under a multi-touch attribution model, a lead can be credited to more than one piece of content. Time Stamping: Lead interactions are time-stamped so that you can replay the user’s content consumption and identify the “last touch” attribution or the piece of content was consumed just before a marketing lead was converted into a sales opportunity.   How to Setup Campaign Tracking Here is a guide to setting up campaign tracking in Marketo Campaign Reporting After you’ve implemented campaign tracking, you can now view content consumption that pertains to a single lead, contact or opportunity record in your CRM.  Below is a screenshot of how we track content consumption for a lead at my company. In a single view, you can see which content was consumed, the type of the content (eBook, newsletter, webinar, etc…) the date of the consumption, and the action perfomed (downloaded, opened, etc...).  From here, your next step is to generate reports and use the analytics to help you evaluate the success of your campaign (these reports could be generated natively or using a plugin like Full Circle CRM for Salesforce). Consider questions like: How many new leads did a particular piece of content generate? How many existing leads in my database engaged with a particular piece of content? Which pieces of content were the most effective at moving leads lower into the funnel (towards opportunities and ultimately sales)? Which parts of the funnel have insufficient content support? Once you’ve tracked your campaigns and analyzed the results, you should have a better feel for whether your investment in content marketing is paying off. These measurements will help you understand where you should invest money in the future to make content even stronger. For more strategies to prove the ROI of your content marketing efforts, download my extensive eBook on the topic, The Comprehensive Guide to Content Marketing Analytics & Metrics . Author: Pawan Deshpande BIO: Pawan is the founder and CEO of Curata. His work has been recognized through the Boston Business Journal's 40 under 40 Award. He was also a finalist for MarketingProfs B2B Marketer of the Year. Pawan is a speaker at marketing conferences such as AMA, SXSW, Content2Conversion, and Content Marketing World.
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Use the Salesforce workflow engine to supercharge your marketing automation in this presentation from the Marketo Summit 2014. Presented by Delinda Tinkey and Charlie Liang.
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How do you know if your organization is ready for B2B Marketing Operations (MO) 2.0? This paper will help you determine if your organization is ready by asking questions like: What does that organization look like? What are its primary pain points? What is its vision for the future? What pressures are driving it to consider undergoing substantial change? THE CURRENT STATE OF B2B MARKETING OPERATIONS Marketing Operations is still finding its way into the enterprise, but it has certainly made has made significant strides in the past three years. Consider: In Silicon Valley, less than two-dozen companies had formalized Marketing Operations functions in place in 2005; that number today is likely in the hundreds. Even smaller upstarts, such as Big Band Networks, CyperSource, Iron Key and InsideView, have recognized the value of Marketing Operations by investing in dedicated staff. At least a half-dozen MO-related special interest groups have arrived on social media sites, such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Plaxo and Yahoo Groups. Conferences, such as ad:tech, eMetrics Marketing Optimization Summit and Predictive Analytics World, have added Marketing Operations to their agendas. The Marketing Operations Cross-Company Alliance (MOCCA) has grown to more than 500 members and the Marketing Operations Future Forum, which was just formed in April 2009, already exceeds 300 members. Even in a bad economy during the winter holidays, a search of MO-related job openings uncovered several dozen opportunities. The first courses on the discipline of Marketing Operations were offered through the University of California system and in Asia (Hong Kong) in 2008. The UCSC Extension MO course is expected to become available online in January 2010. A CHECKLIST FOR YOUR COMPANY To see if your company is a good candidate for B2B Marketing Operations 2.0, check all the characteristics listed below that apply. My company invests a significant amount in marketing resources (headcount and/or budget). My company’s marketplace is dynamic and highly competitive. My company’s marketing has evolved into a complex and multi-dimensional function. A diverse mix of programs and resources are funded to reach a breadth of audiences (segments, sales channels, internal and external stakeholders, etc.). My company faces government and regulatory compliance pressures. My company’s marketing processes have evolved to the point where they are no longer well coordinated or even well-understood. My company values best practices but lacks process, technology and metrics to achieve them. My company is pressuring marketing to assume a more strategic role. Within my company, many believe that marketing must deliver greater value for the company’s investment. If you checked half or more of the above statements, your company is a great candidate to benefit by leveraging the power of B2B Marketing Operations 2.0. WHERE DO YOU FEEL THE PAIN? If your company is feeling some pain, you’re probably acutely aware of it. Arriving at an accurate diagnosis, however, requires a careful examination. Before reviewing the checklist below to identify localized pain points, first consider the general health of your marketing effort. Does marketing currently receive wide recognition for its strategic leadership and bottom-line contribution? Is marketing in complete alignment with your company’s strategic goals and other key functions? Can marketing clearly measure its success and demonstrate ROI to your executive team? MO 2.0 is specifically designed to address these corporate pain points: A Marketing team focused on firefighting and tactics rather than on strategy. A Marketing team experiencing difficulty measuring ROI and demonstrating value, causing it often to be on the defensive, needing to justify marketing accountability to C-level executives and investors. Marketing success tied to other groups that have different, or even conflicting, goals. A corporate environment that fails to support collaboration and consequently loses opportunities for synergy. Employee defections that jeopardize continuity, place institutional knowledge and expertise at risk and contribute to high customer churn. Marketing processes that too often constrain internal efficiencies and effectiveness instead of enabling them. Poor coordination of shared processes across functions. Difficulty assimilating and integrating programs, systems and resources obtained from corporate mergers or acquisitions, leading to leading to duplication, momentum loss, lack of focus and resistance to change. If you resonate with two or more of the above statements, your organization may be in enough pain to be ready to embrace B2B Marketing Operations 2.0. WHAT’S YOUR VISION OF MARKETING’S CONTRIBUTION? In a perfect world, marketing operates as a very creative, fast-paced, results-driven function that stays close to the customer and its other stakeholders. It is not only aligned with the enterprise’s strategic agenda but also helps define it. It leads the customer experience and innovation processes. It is well integrated with other corporate functions and takes full advantage of the power and discipline of a strategically designed B2B Marketing Operations 2.0 infrastructure. The MO 2.0 infrastructure layers into the marketing function the processes, technology, guidance and metrics required by an efficient operation that delivers outstanding value on a consistent basis. Such an MO 2.0 infrastructure enables informed decision-making, accountability, sustainability, visibility, teamwork, strategic thinking and repeatable best practices execution. A marketing organization is ready to think seriously about embracing MO 2.0 when it feels internal and external pressures to make systemic changes because it has not been delivering on its vision and has consistently failed to achieve its operational goals. The CEO considers the CMO/Marketing VP to be a valued strategic partner. Marketing is fully aligned with other company functions and stakeholders. Marketing efforts accelerate new product adoption, strengthen customer relationships and increase market penetration rate. Marketing leverages metrics and dashboards to measure and track results, and continually improve them. Dashboards rapidly and accurately inform decision makers. Metrics are aligned with corporate goals and increasingly drive marketing expenditures. The marketing team is energized and highly effective. Employee and customer loyalty are consistently high. High return on marketing investment is clearly recognized companywide. Unless you’ve checked at least half of the above statements, there is a large gap between your vision and your current reality. Your company is ripe—or more than ripe—for MO 2.0. Characteristic Organizational Pain Desired Vision Substantial marketing investment (resources, programs, budget) Unmanageable complexity, difficulty demonstrating ROI, Marketing on defensive Marketing optimizes resources to deliver substantial ROI Leverages processes, technology and best practices to spur productivity, knowledge sharing Utilizes dashboards and metrics to make informed spend decisions Is recognized by C-team for its accountability and ROI contribution Dynamic, competitive market No, or disappointing, growth, super-growth, high customer churn, high employee turnover Marketing aligns with other functions to take responsibility for: Nurturing sales funnel Revenue targets Innovation process New market penetration Customer experience Under media or regulatory scrutiny for: Shareholder confidence Supplier to government High-profile industry Compliance pressure, impact of change on SOX compliance, media magnifying glass Marketing partners with Quality, Finance, IR to meet compliance requirements Maps key processes Documents best practices Applies LEAN, Six Sigma and other methodologies Demonstrates ROI through KPIs, dashboards, etc. M&A integration challenges Actual or Pending Duplicated efforts, loss of continuity, “everything needs attention” syndrome, difficulty getting buy-in for change initiatives Marketing leads M&A and other change initiatives Communications leadership “Walking the talk” More tactical than strategic Firefighting, CYA behavior Marketing is valued strategic partner to CEO and C-team Some or all of the content contained in this white paper was contributed by Gary M. Katz, CEO of Marketing Operations Partners (www.mopartners.com)
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Brought to you by Email Marketing Software by Marketo
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Brought to you by Email Marketing Software by Marketo
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Earlier in my career, I focused my work on assisting consumer marketers in their segmentation. One of my guiding principles was that Consumers are Humans and act like Humans vs. treating them as a demographic (which just looks at age, gender, etc.) for example. What does it mean to target humans: They are a Tribe: They are members of a group with common interests, lifestyles, hobbies, etc. It's important to understand these tribes because  A a majority of buying decisions happen without anybody of the company or any content being used as part of that buying decision. Research from McKinsey says that across all industries, 63 percent of all buying decisions happen without anybody from the company being there. Know their watering holes: It's important to understand where these Tribes spend their time. Bikers might meet at the same place in the morning, for example. Or they might spend their time in the same types of online communities. Their Tribe has a common language: Members of this group have their own speech patterns, colloquialism and vocabulary. Just look at the Fiskateers, a community buit by a around the desire to design and discuss scrapbookers. The company did not try to build their own community. Instead, tehey asked those scrapbookers if they would like Fiskars to help set up a community. The scrapbookers said, “Sure, we will call ourselves Fiskateers. It’s going to be a close community. You need to talk to us before you can be accepted into the community. We will give parties, raves and demos….” They have their own rituals: Just go to any pre-school in the country and see how mothers (and fathers) get together, share parenting tips, attend the same parties, shop in the same places, etc. Think about reciprocity: Don't just sell. Build the relationship first. I don't go to a party and just give my business card to everyone when I arrive. I usually just give it to people I care about or want to maintain a relationship. Didn't someone say "treat others how you want to be treated It's time to move way from the classical approach of channels, demographics, and just sales and to focus on people's tribes, their watering holes and their language.
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Good tips to help prepare you for tomorrow.
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Over the last year, the role of a marketing team within a company, particularly the CMO, has evolved drastically. Being able to market in its most traditional sense is no longer they key: businesses expect marketers to become digital and technology leaders. The marketing department now consists of technology builders, who have to create new channels (websites, mobile apps, facebook apps, etc), implement new tracking systems (marketing automation, CRMs, mobile analytics), and integrate these into their customers’ experiences. More importantly, they have to quantify each step of the marketing funnel. As Gardner Research often points out “Technology is the heart of Marketing, and CMOs will outspend their company’s CIO by 2017.” This new responsibility requires looking at their job through a different prism. They need to conduct business in a completely different manner because now, it’s vital to the success of their business. CMO’s now have to: Find the right technology provider whose nimble Ensure they can easily fire your technology provider just as they would do with with their ad agency Build in performance goals for the technology provider Rely on the CIO to drive the technology purchasing decision Make key decisions by extensively kicking the tires of these technologies. (Note: To this day, it still surprises how many technology providers do not have sandboxes or a demo product for CMOs to properly evaluate their products.) As a result Marketing will have to quarterback the technology acquisition and licensing process for their companies. To accomplish this, they will need to: Sync up with the company’s business goals Prioritize and identify the critical few projects Facilitate projects and communications between marketing and IT Prioritize funding for marketing technologies Select, evaluate and choose technology providers Define success for these providers (hold them accountable) Design and implement technology keeping digital business models in mind Plan ongoing reviews of technology provider and your goals Push your technology provider to continue to ameliorate their technology According to IBM’s CMO study, however, there are many barriers to adopting technology. See below: None of these, however, focus on being able to leverage technology to improve the overall customer experience or extract actionable data. Marketers need to carefully consider how implementing a new marketing system impacts people visiting their site. This needs to be carefully looked at by capturing VOC (Voice of the Customer and looking closely at data. I am surprised, however, how many still don’t focus on lifetime value or retention. As eMarketer shows below, there tends to be a focus on one time activities (campaign tracking) and brand analysis (which does focus on their customers behaviors and competitive intelligence. Understanding your customers data is the fuel of your marketing organizations. Since marketing is now a key for major technology buyers, CMOs need to know how to evaluate, implement and leverage new systems. All parts of marketing is impacted by technology. To prepare for their new role, CMOs then need to Be able to quantify each step of the funnel which means they need to have the technology to accomplish this. Identify or hire individual who has the technology background in Marketing Automation, CRM, and Web Analytics. In many cases, you don’t even need to have a Marketing Technology officer as some companies are beginning to do. As a result, a new job title has come on the scene – “Chief Marketing Technology Officer (CMTO). Within large companies — more than $500 million in annual revenue — 81% of them now have a chief marketing technologist role, up from 71% just a year ago. Another 8% expect to add that role within the next 24 months. However, smaller companies might not be able to afford to pay for an additional Marketing chief. Have this person map out your technology and challenge them to figure out how the many pieces of the many technology puzzle fit together (no solution will solve all your problems) — how your marketing automation system fits with your CRM system, for example) Be committed to a just-in-time agile approach (they can learn from their engineers meet Agile Development process and apply it  marketing) Map out the process too before buying the technology (but be flexible) Embrace technology — pick a few technologies to learn. Yes, I think CMOs need to understand how some of these products work. Marketers need to understand that any change in a company’s infrastructure can impact the overall customer experience. They need to embrace technology vs. fear it. They can no longer say ‘it’s too technical to understand.’ As Phil Fernandez, Marketo’s CEO said, “The days of ownership are being replaced with the days of partnership.” In the modern, connected, mobile environment, companies need to connect with customers with personalized and differentiated services. So called “stickiness” is essential and CMOs should be better equipped to meet those demands, regardless of whether or not they have the same level of technical knowledge as the CIO Despite all of the above, CMO’s should not be lead by technology and should remember that it is just an enabler. Instead, marketing leaders should: Map out the ecosystem of everyone who impacts your product Focus on a few target audiences at first (prospects, customers, partners) Map out each of their customer journeys (online and offline) Identify their water holes and where they spend their time Understand how they speak about their work, your product, etc. Understand the jobs/tasks they get paid to do Map out potential experiences in the funnel Determine the right technology to collect data at those key touch points Much of the change in the CMO’s role is due to customers’ every increasing influencer. What do you think is causing this?
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Big Data is rock’n the Marketer’s world. It is signalling a wake-up call that marketers need to be more metrics driven, more technically savvy and more process oriented. At the top of the food chain, CMOs are taking on responsibilities that traditionally belonged to CIOs. And at the middle management level, marketers are being required to be more technical and metrics oriented. The days of just fishing for eyeballs or operating based on one’s gut instinct are long gone. It is no longer acceptable to just look at demographics or psychographics or just count eyeballs. Instead, marketers need to focus on the numbers — people’s tribes, their behaviors, their interests, their online behavior — both in terms of surfing the website or a mobile app or transacting with a page or shopping cart.. Most marketers would agree, however, that they are not prepared for the incoming Big Data wave: they lack resources, lack data know-how, and they don’t know how to get started. According to a study from The Economist Intelligence Unit, only 24% of marketers use data for actionable marketing insight. Furthermore, in that same study almost 50% of marketers cited a lack of capacity to analyze big data. Some companies are increasing their budgets for Big Data analytics. The problem is that there’s no road map for getting these marketers up to speed. Rather than focus on the bells and whistles (the technology) of big data, here’s are 7 steps a marketer a marketer can take to get out of their comfort zone and jump into the Big Data World: Understand the definition of Big Data, which is usually defined by the 3Vs: Volume or the amount of data involved Variety or to how the data is structured Velocity or the rate at which it is generated and analysed Subscribe to and learn from few key bloggers, who can teach you the ropes: SemAngel Blog by Gary Angel: Gary brings over twenty years of experience in decision support, CRM, and software development. Gary co-founded Semphonic and is the President and Chief Technology Officer.  But don’t let the CTO title fool you. Gary is the the brightest consultant I have worked with and can take complex techn issues and break them down into easily digestible and understandable. chunks for markets Analytics Blog by Justin Cutron: Justin is currently the Analytics Advocate at Google, so he has a boatload of knowledge. In his blog, he breaks down digital analytics for businesses. Customer Analytics blog by the SAS’ companies – This blog is for anyone who is looking for ways to improve the business of marketing and communicating with customers, which includes everything from multi-level marketing to social media campaigns. Big Data Hub by IBM: This blog is filled with case studies, videos, etc. from key players at IBM and beyond. Business Analytics Blog by Tim Elliot: Tom is an Innovation Evangelist for SAP. This blog contains his personal views, thoughts, and opinions on business analytics. Get your organization big data ready: Tear down your organization’s silos and engage multiple departments Give team members homework — tell them to read the blogs mentioned above. Think about how you will link your current data infrastructure to your project (that means a business analyst, and IT guy, etc. should be involved in the meeting) Know and recognize that Big Data is a team sport Work with  framework your organization agrees on, such as: Define Your Goal Understand your resources Review key segment’s Journey Confirm you are capturing data during each phase Establish benchmark Create a small measurable deliverable (test) Track over time Establish toll gate reviews Expand program Tweak your programs as needed Define the desired outcome and the one question you want to answer Yes, narrow it down to one (primary) question Answer the question and move on Understand your inputs by breaking down your customer(s) journey Identify the different sources of data, such as social network behavior, information from third party lists, mobile usage, downloads, etc. List out different types of potential metrics you could track: Information related specifically to the customers transactions (or actions) Information related to a segment’s usage patterns Information related to the overall marketing program In some respects Big Data is just an extension of database marketing, a popular term in the 1980s and 1990s because it focuses on leveraging customer information to segment an audience and develop personalized campaigns. The biggest difference now is that we can leverage unstructured data (video for example) and implement just-in-time programs. I am a big believer in learning by doing. If a Marketer really wants to be figure out how to integrate big data into their business processes, they need to have on-the-job training. (And to that point, I actually believe this is important for the CMO as well as the Business Analyst, although the latter might get more in the proverbial data weeds!). If marketers don’t do this, they will lose their admission ticket to be in the marketing world.
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Contrary to what you might have heard, rumors about the Marketing Funnel’s demise are greatly exaggerated. The Funnel is alive and well. And it should be leveraged extensively by Marketers. It provides a consistent and universally understood (and somewhat accepted) framework. The funnel does come in a variety of shapes and sizes and colors – with different twists and turns. Despite this variety, few Marketers really leverage this powerful model. The funnel enables Marketers to have an almost universally understood visual representation of various customer touch points, and makes it easier to track and score a person’s behavior. The Marketo funnel provides a good (although, not the only) framework and consists of six key stages: Awareness: This is the universe of people who know anything about Marketo no matter what social network they participate on, what articles they read, etc. Inquiry: This is when we finally know something about the person; we know at least their their name and email address. Prospect: This is when the individual has taken some sort of action. Lead: Finally This person is treated as a lead and can be shared with a sales organization. Opportunity: The sales team has accepted these leads and added them to their pipeline. Customer: The person becomes a customer and they are passed on to a new revenue cycle for upsell and retention. Of course, each of these stages include multiple marketing tactics and scoring approaches. It’s important, though, to understand the difference between a contact (or a prospect) and a true lead (someone who has explicitly engaged with the company). Obviously, the relationship does not end after an individual becomes a customer. At that point, you can upsell or cross sell them. You can determine the value of a customer based on the different products they purchase, if they adopted your product sooner than others or if they are part of a referral program, etc.  As Seth Godin points out – “Customers are traditionally undervalued, and prospects are all treated the same.” Godin continues: “Once you see the funnel, it’s easy to understand how valuable your existing customers are, and easy to think about how you want to spend time and money in promoting and building your site. Most Marketers are running a flat campaign. Embracing the funnel changes the way you treat people. And treating different people differently is what consumers demand.” Having a model like the funnel and a good marketing automation tool enables you to measure and understand the cost of each interaction. Sharing this information with the rest of your organization helps build a Marketer’s credibility in a company, especially with the CFO. The funnel also provides a learning framework for Marketers to test out different messaging and creative at each stage of the funnel. This gives Marketers the option to fine-tuning his current program. Since I started my first big marketing job in American Express in 1992, I have heard lots of critiques of the funnel. Marketers love the catch phrases, such as ‘The Funnel is Dead.’ Well, I disagree. It’s advantages have has evolved since 1898 when E. St. Elmo Lewis developed a model which mapped a theoretical customer journey from the moment a brand or product attracted consumer attention to the point of action or purchase. (St. Elmo Lewis’ idea is often referred to as the AIDA-model – an acronym which stands for Awareness, Interest, Desire, and Action). Let’s address some of the funnel naysayers’ concerns, most of which apply to any marketing or sales model: It fails to take into account the ‘feedback loop between existing customers and prospects.’ Whether it is the funnel or another framework (such as a Life Preserver Ring of unique  ‘Awareness, Interest, Desire and Action areas’), there always exists the challenge of tracking all the interactions among people (customers and prospects ). It’s always difficult to uncover each discussion about your brand online. The funnel is too linear. According to these critics, the primary problem with the funnel is that the buying process is no longer linear. Well, I was always taught that the shortest distance between two points is a straight line.  Most of the companies I work with, however, do have the majority of their customers follow more or less a linear process. They can be broken down into the different stages described in the Marketo model above. If fails to track retention or repeat business. I must confess this might be the weakest part of most funnel models. But that doesn’t mean you should ignore the simplicity of the Funnel’s approach. Most frameworks do not go into any great detail about ‘Retention’ or ‘Lifetime Value’ anyway. The bottom line is that good Marketers constantly score their customers over time. American Express might be the masters at this. They leverage all their great Cardmember spending data to model, score and customize online and offline programs. It fails to paint a pretty picture, nor does the word funnel doesn’t sound great. I never did judge a book by its cover or a person by their name. If this is what a Marketer is worried about, then they are focused on the wrong things. There are many powerful Six-Sigma names and diagrams, for example, that don’t convey a powerful image such as SIPOC (Single Point of Contact), DPO (Defects Per Opportunity), PD (Proportion defective) It fails to take into consideration the powerful feedback loops between existing customers and newly arriving prospects that search and social media have wired up. I beg to differ. If you have some of your word of mouth programs coded properly you should be able to track shares, referrals and other types of influencer programs. It fails to consider some products, such as iPhones, where marketing is integrated into the product. I think it comes down to how you set up your programs. You should be able to track cross-sell and upsell, and even referrals from within a product. With Flurry, for example, you can track your customers behavior when they use a mobile app. It tracks the big 3: taps, tasks and transitions. The Funnel fails to capture all touch points. Over time, a good Marketer should be able to define these, however. They also should ensure they are in learning mode so that they can constantly update their list of sources. This means they should be tracking referral links, surveying their customers and analyzing where their competitors get their leads from. And then there’s the McKinsey Consumer Journey (see below) which attempts to demonstrate that the buying process is not linear and that several steps repeat themselves. For the real digital practitioner, however, it’s too simple to say someone goes from Bond to Buy: . While brands may put the decision maker, the Customer,  at the center of the McKinsey Customer Journey, the above excludes the importance of the experience the Marketer and the company are having with the customers. Life is not all about the transaction. For example, at Marketo, our energy goes into building relationships with Marketers as well as connecting Marketers together. In addition, you don’t have to be a customer to recommend a product. I am probably the biggest promoter of Tesla, but I can’t afford one. I have only tried it via a Freemium ride provided by a neighbor and have read great reviews about it on Edmunds.com. Does that mean I can’t recommend the vehicle to others? Obviously not. In sum, CMOs and their teams need to know that the funnel is alive and kicking. Rumors of its demise are greatly exaggerated. The Funnel is an easy to use, easy to remember approach to tracking individuals who interact with your brand – either directly or indirectly. It’s simplicity is what makes it special – and it provides the most universally understood way of thinking about an individual’s interaction with your brand. It works not only in a B2C environment, but also in a B2B environment. Marketers should always feel free, however to add their own creative twist on things and rename all or parts of it.  Long-Live the Funnel.
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Included in this article: Overview Marketo provides several options to help you decide whether a person should receive emails. The options within Marketo Sales Insight (MSI) can alter this behavior, so this article will go through what those differences are. How Marketo Decides Whether to Send an Email There are three ways that marketing emails can be stopped from being sent by Marketo. Full details can be found here Understanding Unsubscribe - Marketo Docs but here's a recap: People have the option to unsubscribe from emails. If they unsubscribe, marketing emails will be blocked, but operational emails will still be sent. If the email hard bounces, Marketo will mark the email as invalid, which blocks all further emails. If your organization wants to block emails to particular people, there two options: “Marketing Suspended” will block Marketing emails, but not operational emails (e.g. an email with a whitepaper that was requested via a form fill-out). “Black Listed” means that this person will not receive any emails of any kind (e.g. used for competitors). Emails Sent from Sales Insight Default setting Emails sent through MSI are sent depending on the settings in Marketo Admin > Sales Insight. The standard out-of-the-box settings for these 'sales emails' is to "Show Unsubscribe Footer" for "All Emails". Unsubscribe footers Unsubscribe footer included If the Unsubscribe Footer is included in the email, then the email will be considered a marketing email. MSI will therefore "Respect Unsubscribe Settings" by following the record's Unsubscribe/Suspended/Blacklisted/Invalid status. Unsubscribe footer not included Emails not showing the footer will "Ignore Unsubscribe Settings" and are sent regardless of whether the email address is Invalid, Unsubscribed, Marketing Suspended or Blacklisted. MSI Email Setting Types There are 3 types of sales emails sent from MSI: Standard Marketo marketing emails, e mails marked Operational in Marketo, and emails without templates in MSI. The settings in Admin > Sales Insight will determine whether each type is sent or not. Note: Communication Limits do not ever apply to emails sent from MSI or from the Outlook/Gmail plugin. Standard Marketo marketing emails Marketing emails from Marketo will either "Respect Unsubscribe Settings" or "Ignore Unsubscribe Settings" depending on which option is chosen. If set to "Ignore Unsubscribe Settings", the email will always be sent unless the email is invalid. Emails set as Operational in Marketo Marketo's operational emails published to MSI will only be sent if the setting is to "Ignore Unsubscribe Settings". Emails without templates in MSI If an email is sent through MSI but is not drafted off of a Marketo email that has been published to MSI, then it is not linked back to a Marketo email. The footer that contains the unsubscribe information is appended to Marketo marketing emails. If the email is not drafted in Marketo but instead is drafted from within MSI, then that footer never gets appended to the email, so therefore there's no way for it to even consider unsubscribe settings. How Deliveries are Logged When emails are delivered, they will appear in the Email tab of Sales Insight in that record. If the email was blocked (unsubscribed, invalid email, etc.), there won't be any indication that it was blocked, but the email won't show in the Email tab. Emails sent by Marketo will show the Marketo logo. Emails sent by MSI won't show this logo. Note: this is true even if it is the exact same email sent. Outlook / Gmail Plug-in Emails sent from the Outlook/Gmail plug-in are always sent.  These e mails are sent through your own Outlook/Gmail and not through Marketo. Because the emails are not sent from Marketo, there is no check if the record is unsubscribed or blacklisted, etc. If sent with the “Send and Track” button, these emails will be logged in Marketo but they will not be mail merged. All emails that are actually sent (in other words: not blocked) will be visible in the Activity Log in Marketo, Activity History in Salesforce.com (if configured to sync this) and the Email tab in Sales Insight. If an email is blocked it is not recorded anywhere. Send to Email Invalid? Send to Unsubscribed? Send to Marketing Suspended? Send to Blacklisted? If record hit Communication Limits, will the email send? Smart Campaign Normal No No No No No Operational No Yes Yes No Yes Sales Insight in SFDC Show Footer No No No No Yes Hide Footer No Yes Yes Yes Yes Outlook/Gmail Plug-in All Emails Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
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