Standard Naming for companies with special characters in their name

craigc
Level 1

Standard Naming for companies with special characters in their name

What is the best practice for companies that have special characters in their name? For example, B&B Repair.  Would you rename to BB Repair or B and B Repair?

Tags (1)
6 REPLIES 6
SanfordWhiteman
Level 10 - Community Moderator

Re: Standard Naming for companies with special characters in their name

In what context are you concerned about an ampersand?

 

That's just an ASCII character, there's nothing special about it except in certain contexts (and in URLs & HTML, where it is special, it can merely be escaped — doesn't need to be removed).

rish_tracktik
Level 2

Re: Standard Naming for companies with special characters in their name

Ideally, the best practice is to keep the company name as to how you got it first place. Why would you try to rename? Any specific use case?

craigc
Level 1

Re: Standard Naming for companies with special characters in their name

If a lead inputs it incorrectly or doesn't match dnb.com business name 

SanfordWhiteman
Level 10 - Community Moderator

Re: Standard Naming for companies with special characters in their name

Hi @craigc, when you get a moment pls expand on this q... @rish_tracktik and I would really like to know what scenario would lead you to ask about forcibly changing company names.

craigc
Level 1

Re: Standard Naming for companies with special characters in their name

Renaming them to be standardized. For example, when a lead fills out a contact form and states their company is 'B&B' but when we look up their company on dnb.com is it listed as 'B and B Roofing LLC'

SanfordWhiteman
Level 10 - Community Moderator

Re: Standard Naming for companies with special characters in their name

A company can have

  • a stylized name, for example "Gulf + Western"
  • a formal legal name (which may exclude some non-alphanumeric characters), for example "Gulf and Western Industries, Inc."

Except in very old legacy environments (i.e. mainframe-era systems where nothing but upper-case ASCII letters is available) there's no reason to use anything other than one of these.

 

As the stylized name is often the popular name of a company, from a sales standpoint you can lose valuable info if you change the stylized name into something the salesperson doesn't recognize.