1 Reply Latest reply on Jul 24, 2017 9:19 AM by Nick Hajdin

    What are your favorite email reactivation campaigns?

    Michael Madden

      Oh boy, here we go with the cute animals. teespring really nailed it with their reactivation email. First off, show me a cute puppy and you have my undivided attention. While this might seem silly, it’s actually the perfect strategy for captivating your inactive subscribers. Show them something they can’t look away from, and you’ll get more inactive subscribers to engage. The headline “Come Back?” is simple yet actionable. The copy is lighthearted and leverages powerful personalization to prove the impact of their product for each individual subscriber. Well done, teespring!

      teespring-reactivation-email

       

      For more email reactivation campaigns, check out our blog 5 Email Reactivation Campaigns That Win Subscribers Back. And if you have questions about email marketing, look no further than our Email Marketing Best Practices Resources!

        • Re: What are your favorite email reactivation campaigns?
          Nick Hajdin

          Reactivation campaigns are a great way to keep your database clean. In your example, I really love the use of personalization to remind the inactive user why they should remain an (engaged) customer.

           

          Cute puppies definitely grab attention, but it's important to remember these subscribers have likely not been opening your messages in the first place. Get creative with subject lines and prompt emotional curiosity: "Did we do something wrong"?; "Is is you, or is it me"; "Goodbyes are hard". Once you get them to open, hit them with the engaging graphics and headlines.

           

          Keep it short, simple, sweet. Remind the user why they signed up, clearly sharing the value proposition of your marketing communication. Ideally, build a preference center and allow the subscriber to edit the types of content and frequency of communications.

           

          Litmus had a pretty good example, borrowing from the Clash and using the subject line "Should we stay or should we go?".