11 Replies Latest reply on Apr 17, 2018 7:27 PM by Taishi Yamada

    Chinese Simplified, Chinese Traditional, Japanese and Korean Email Fonts

    Frank Breen

      As a Western Email Developer I was asked to develop emails in Chinese Simplified, Chinese Traditional, Japanese and Korean (CJK). After a lot of research, testing and actual sends here is my guide.

       

      First of all we need to declare English target fonts before Chinese target fonts, because English language fonts do not contain the glyphs for Chinese characters, but Chinese fonts do contain a-z characters. This means if you declare the Chinese fonts first, any English-language computer that has the standard Chinese font faces installed will display English characters using Chinese fonts (Example: Western installs of the Operating Systems) . This means English characters will be rendered in the first font and Chinese characters will be displayed using the fall-back Chinese fonts. Even if the Email is entirely in Chinese, English character will pop-up on occasion, so it's good to declare this way. The same theory goes for Japanese and Korean declarations.

       

      Fonts for Chinese Simplified and Chinese Traditional:

       

      Windows

      宋体, SimSun

       

      OS X

      华文仿宋, STFangsong

       

      The above is my tried and tested fonts, other fonts available are:

       

      Windows

      黑体:SimHei

      新宋体:NSimSun

      仿宋:FangSong

      楷体:KaiTi

      仿宋_GB2312:FangSong_GB2312

      楷体_GB2312:KaiTi_GB2312

      微软雅黑体:Microsoft YaHei

       

      OS X

      冬青黑体: Hiragino Sans GB

      华文细黑:STHeiti Light [STXihei]

      华文黑体:STHeiti

      华文楷体:STKaiti

      华文宋体:STSong

       

      What this looks like in the declaration:

       

      font-family: Arial, 宋体, SimSun, 华文仿宋, STFangsong, sans-serif;

       

      Fonts for Japanese:

       

      Windows

      メイリオ, Meiryo

      MS Pゴシック, MS PGothic

       

      OX X

      ヒラギノ角ゴ Pro W3, Hiragino Kaku Gothic Pro

       

      What this looks like in the declaration:

       

      font-family: Arial, メイリオ, Meiryo, MS Pゴシック, MS PGothic, ヒラギノ角ゴ Pro W3, Hiragino Kaku Gothic Pro, sans-serif;

       

      Fonts for Korean

       

      Windows

      돋움, Dotum

       

      OS X

      굴림, Gulim

       

      What this looks like in the declaration:

       

      font-family: Arial, 돋움, Dotum, 굴림, Gulim, sans-serif;

       

      It's best practice to use both the Local and English spelling of the fonts along with the PC and Mac declaration.

       

      Attached below is a text document with declarations for easy reference.