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Article Text So you’ve now used the previous document (Getting Started With Guided Landing Pages:) to download a template from our library and set it up in your Marketo instance, you have even used it to make a landing page or two and you’ve customized those landing pages, AND you’ve even gone the extra mile and customized your template and modified some elements! (Editing Marketo Guided Landing Page Templates, Pt. 1 - Elements:) All of which is fantastic news! Good job!   But if you recall from the article that showed you how to edit Elements on the template, I skipped right over the section on Variables. This is the piece that this document is designed to tackle.   So what is a variable? If you edit a Guided Landing Page you will see a panel on the right hand side that displays both Elements and Variables. In this instance, the variables do everything from assigning a gradient color, to deciding if you want to display or hide different sections of the landing page. Modifying a variable in the landing page editor is designed to be really simple, just click the variable you want to change and give it a new value. Here I changed the Primary Gradient 1 and 2 from 1DA083 and 0F3450 to A00E35 and F2F2F2 respectively and the landing page changes: At its easiest to understand, a variable works a lot like a token in an email. It’s a placeholder for actual code to be used later. So if I create an email that starts with “Hello, {{lead.firstname:default=Friend}}!” you can tell right away what that’s going to do. Pull the first name from the lead record, if none exists use the word “Friend”.   Think of a Variable as a token that you get to define as well as use. The first step is to define it and the second step is to actually call back to the variable you defined.   While it’s easy for a non-technical user to use a variable (as it should be!), setting one up in the template does require a fair amount of HTML knowledge. As stated before, if you are not comfortable editing HTML and do not have a resource available to you, please reach out to services@marketo.com, they are able to assist with any sort of coding needs.   So as before, let’s dive into the template, this time we’re going straight for the Variable code.       <!-- Marketo Variable Definitions -->     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient1" mktoName="Primary Gradient 1" default="#1da083">     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient2" mktoName="Primary Gradient 2" default="#0f3450">   So right at the start of the template, we’re off to the races defining variables. As you can see with the Gradient 1 and Gradient 2, these are both marked with a class of “mktoColor”.   As with the Elements, the full list of Variable types can be found here: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Create+a+Guided+Landing+Page+Template        class : "mktoString"      class : "mktoColor"      class : "mktoBoolean"   A string is a variable that contains a value, Color should be obvious what that does and Boolean is a yes or no choice.   In addition to the class, each variable has to have a unique ID. This is critical and used when the variable is called later on down the page. When you call a variable it’s always with the syntax of ${id name}. So in this case ${gradient1} and ${gradient2}. As you can see it looks a LOT like a token but it’s a token you can name whatever you want.   The mktoName is how it displays the variable in the Landing Page editor.   The default value is what it starts out with.   So let’s take a look and see how these Gradients are applied now that they’re defined at the top of the template.   Color is typically used in the CSS portion of the header. As defined in the previous document, CSS stands for “Cascading Style Sheets” and is a way of formatting the same thing over and over again, kind of like setting a font in a word processor.       /* Header Gradient */     #is {         top: 0;         width: 100%;         min-height: 620px;         position: relative;         z-index: 1;         color: #fff; padding-top: 10%;                 background-image: linear-gradient(${gradient1},${gradient2});     }   Now normally in CSS, the linear-gradient option would have two colors listed, the top color and the bottom color and it provides a gradual transition from one to the other.   We could just as easily change this in the template to        background-image: linear-gradient(red,white);   But the problem doing that is that an end user, who is only using the Landing Page Editor, would not be able to change it. The gradient would be defined in the template and inaccessible to the Editor.   Changing these values to the variables defined before allows the user to change the first and second colors in the Landing Page editor interface.   In Summary:   The Meta Tags define what the variables mean:     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient1" mktoName="Primary Gradient 1" default="#1da083">     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient2" mktoName="Primary Gradient 2" default="#0f3450">   The ID= is then used to call the variable and put it into action:       background-image: linear-gradient(${gradient1},${gradient2});   The other benefit to doing it this way is you can re-use the same variable over and over again. Look at this piece of CSS:   body {                 background: ${gradient2};         margin: 0;         color: #696E74;     }   That’s the same ID as the gradient we used before, only applied to a different section. This ensures that the bottom color of the gradient and the background of this section will always be the same color.   Any item in the CSS that contains a text value, a color value or a yes/no choice can be converted to a Variable.   Here’s another common usage:   You’re using a form on your landing page, but you want the end user to be able to change the text on the submit button.   As before you define the variable:        <meta class="mktoString" id="section4ButtonLabel" mktoName="Sec. 4 Button Label" default="More Questions?">   Then farther down the page where the button appears you call the variable you defined before:        <div class="centered mtb">           <a href="${section4ButtonLink}"><button class="btn btn-lg btn-green mt">           ${section4ButtonLabel}</button></a>      </div>   The <a href= is pulling a http link that the user can define in the editor, the button class is setting up a green button as defined in the CSS, and there is our Variable to display the label which reads “More Questions?” Here’s what it looks like in the editor: So this is great, and it makes sense because you can see this was all set up and defined by a professional. What if you wanted to add your own? Is that even possible?   Naturally it is!   First, figure out what you want to convert to a Variable. Is it a piece of text like a button name or a link? Is it a color? Is it a yes/no choice?   Let’s say we want to add a variable that controls the color of the buttons. We have two, both using the same color green, and we want whoever is running the landing page editor to change that without having to go to the template:   Step 1: Define your variable:        <meta class="mktoColor" id="ButtonColor" mktoName="Button Color" default="#1DA083">   We’re talking about colors so the class will be “mktoColor”. The ID can be anything we want it to be as can be the mktoName. The default is the same lovely green shade as was used before.   Now we need to call this color.  Looking at the CSS, we can see the .btn-green is defined as this:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: #1da083;           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }   The background is the color we want to change to a Variable so it can be edited without having to access the template.   Change the code to this:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: ${ButtonColor};           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }     Approve the template and check out the landing page in the editor: Well that’s fantastic, but there’s a separate color for the border, we could just as easily add a variable for it as well:        border: 4px solid #1da083;   We don’t want to HAVE to add another new variable for just the border. We could change the border at the same time as the button. By changing #1da083; to ${ButtonColor};   The trick now becomes what if you change your mind? What if you have a variable in the template that is no longer desired? How do you get rid of it?   Remember each variable is two pieces, the definition and the call. You have to remove BOTH pieces. Technically removing the call would be enough to prevent the change from being made on the page, but the definition is what makes the variable appear in the Landing Page Editor, if you only removed the call then there would be a non-functional Variable in the landing page editor.   So in the case of our button color:   Step 1 would be to strip out the meta tag containing the definition:   Step 2 would be changing the variable name where it’s being used to some fixed value:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: ${ButtonColor}; -> change this to some other fixed color. #00FF33; or the original #1da083;.           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }   Doing both pieces will prevent the Variable from being listed in the Landing Page Editor and prevent it from having any effect on the page.
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Issue Issue Description When selecting an image to display on a landing page, the image shows as a featureless grey box or blank space. There are also spaces in the image's file name.   Solution Issue Resolution Ensure that there are no spaces in the image's file name in Marketo. If there are, remove the spaces from the file name and re-upload.   
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Issue You have a CNAME for your Branded Tracking Links in email but want to restore the settings to the system default (example: mkto-ab01234.com).     Solution Once you have set up a Branded Tracking Link domain, it is not possible to restore it to the Marketo default.  You can change it to a different CNAME domain, but it is not possible to revert to the original.
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Issue You created a picklist field in SFDC and want to know if that field will sync down to Marketo with the field type of picklist.     Solution Marketo has a picklist option in form fields, but not in Lead Database fields. When you sync a field from SFDC that has the type of picklist, this field will show in Marketo with a type of String. However, when you create a form, the field type for your field will show as "select," which is a picklist.  
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Issue Embedded Marketo form not visible in Firefox Private Browsing mode. Solution Firefox's private mode will be enabled by default. When you embed a Marketo form in your own webpages and view it in Firefox's private mode, it will disable the Javascript as part of the tracking protection of this browser. JavaScript is needed for the forms to appear on the landing pages or webpages. The "Tracking Protection" in the Firefox browser will need to be deactivated for the form to appear. Here is an article from FireFox regarding the Tracking Protection: https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/tracking-protection    
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Issue The "View In Browser" link gives an error "Customer does not belong to any POD" when clicked in the Email Preview.     Solution When you Preview an Email you are viewing the layout of the email, but system tokens will not function. When you send a Sample Email, you can test everything as if you are the customer including the system tokens {{system.viewAsWebpageLink}} .
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Issue Marketo Email templates that have been used are showing or appearing within the Salesforce Email Template Picker/Chooser. Solution The templates are created when Marketo syncs lead email activities to Salesforce.  You can disable these activities from syncing in Marketo Admin > Salesforce > Edit Sync Options. Unselect the Email activities or Sales Email activities you have synced.  The templates will no longer be created, but you also won't get these activities pushed from Marketo anymore. This applies to both Sales Insight and normal Marketo sent emails.     If you would like to note an email was sent to a lead without enabling these activities, you can utilize Interesting Moment Flow Steps or Create a Task to sync via the activity log!   Who This Solution Applies To Customer using Sales Insight for Salesforce    
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Issue When you add variables to your email template assets, the value assigned to that variable is not showing in the text-only version of the email even though it shows in the HTML version. Solution Email 2.0 variables do not pass the defined values for variables through to the text-only email. Since Marketo token values are passed through to the text-only email, customers may expect variable values to also be passed through to text-only emails. However, this is not currently the case.
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Issue The subject line for an email sent out to leads did not match what was set for an approved email.   Solution The email may have Dynamic Subject Lines enabled. Dynamic Subject Lines allow you to set dynamic content for the subject line based on the Segmentation of your leads. Visit our Documentation for further information about segments and dynamic content. Segments: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Segments Dynamic Content: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Using+Dynamic+Content+in+an+Email The issue can be resolved by converting the subject line to a Static Subject Line. A Static Subject Line is a single line of content that will send out to any recipient of your email, regardless of their segmentation. You can do so by doing the following:   Click on the Subject Line to bring up the Subject Line edit buttons. Click the Make Static button
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Issue When trying to edit an email you are receiving the error "Cannot Load Email" with out any other details. This is only when trying to edit the email, other functionalities like cloning still work.   Solution The reason you are receiving this error message is because the HTML of the email has been corrupted. Extract the HTML of the email by following the instructions here: https://docs.marketo.com/display/DOCS/Download+an+Email's+HTML Find the email and select it In the Email Actions Drop down click Download HTML Once the emails HTML is extracted you can check on the errors by pushing the HTML through a validator ( https://validator.w3.org/ ) **If no Errors are evident please create a support ticket. If there are errors but you would still like to use the HTML in an email.   Create a new email, replace the HTML with the extracted content from the old email Append the HTML to resolve any errors that would corrupt the content Save and Approve Email for use in campaigns and programs  
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Issue You may notice this permission error "You do not have sufficient privileges to perform this action" when previewing an email even though the user role has permission to access the emails. Solution This can happen when the user role didn't have any access to the lead database as shown in the picture. The user role needs the top-level access to the Lead Database(1 of 15). This is because the email previewer allows one to view the asset as if you were a specific lead, but if you can't see the leads, then the error will trigger. To fix this issue, you would need to provide the user role with top-level access to the lead database.        
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Issue Ghostery is a private Ad blocker that is used to block ads and stop trackers. When Ghostery add-on is used, the add-on blocks Marketo Forms.     Solution To display Marketo forms on a Firefox browser with the Ghostery Add-on, change the Marketo URL in the form embed code to use your landing page CNAME instead.  For example: The default embed code, <script src="//app-sjint.marketo.com/js/forms2/js/forms2.min.js"></script> <form id="mktoForm_2019"></form> <script>MktoForms2.loadForm("//app-sjint.marketo.com", "123-ABS-557", 2019);</script>   should be Changed to use the CNAMEinstead of Marketo URL as below:   <script src="//go.example.com/js/forms2/js/forms2.min.js"></script> <form id="mktoForm_2019"></form> <script>MktoForms2.loadForm("//go.example.com", "123-ABC-557", 2019);</script>   Marketo forms embedded in this way may take longer to load as the form scripts are not fetched though the content delivery network. If you are embedding the form on an SSL secured page, you will need to have Secured Domains for Landing Pages set up on your Marketo instance, as there are issues with running an unsecured form on a secure page.    
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Issue Sometimes, you may receive an auto response from an email that has been sent through a batch campaign. The auto response email will not show the lead's email address instead it does contain the HTML of the email along with the Marketo decorated link. Is there a way to decipher this to determine which lead record this corresponds to?   Solution You could try opening a new browser window and either clear your cookies first or use the browser's private browsing feature (makes a cookie sandbox) so you don't confuse Marketo and tie that person's lead to you by accident. Anyways, in your cookie-free browser, click the link and then go to a form that Marketo prefills for you and you may see the email address that was originally targeted.    
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Issue You want to lock specific parts of an email, such as the From or Reply-To, to prevent certain users from editing them. Solution Through roles and various permissions you can prevent editing of the email as a whole. You do not have the ability to allow only partial edit of an email header such as the From/To. The same applies to Sales Insight emails. Edit permissions are granted for the email as a whole Note: You can prevent people from editing pieces of an email by making those sections non-editable on the template level, but again, this would apply to all users.        
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Issue When creating a new Landing Page asset in Design Studio, an approved Landing Page template does not show up in the template drop-down list. Any attempt to clone an asset which uses this template throws error indicating it cannot be cloned. Solution In Design Studio, 1. Select the template in question on the left-hand side folder tree 2. On the right-hand side, mouse-over template name and click the pencil icon that appears on the right corner of template name 3. Change the template name to a temporary name 4. Click the pencil icon again and revert it back to the original name Root Cause This is due to corrupted template name which happens due to simultaneous edits or renaming of templates multiple times. Environment Landing Page Design Studio
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Issue Issue Description Some tokens in "Show Custom HTML Form for Known People" under Form settings don't populate.     Solution Issue Resolution There are four default tokens that Marketo puts in by default: {{lead.FirstName}}    {{lead.LastName}}    {{form.Button:default=Download}}    {{form.NotYou:default=Not you?} Only the four tokens above can be used. Any other token will not work here.             Who This Solution Applies To
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Issue You go to a Marketo form that has prefill enabled and see that it contains some other person's information. Solution Form prefill can display another person's information if a Marketo email sent to one person is then forwarded to someone else.   Clicking on another person's tracked link cookies you with their information and causes it to prefill in the form.   To correct this, clear the cache and cookies on your browser.   If you would like to make sure this does not occur with your customers, please disable form prefill for the fields on your form.   There is nothing wrong with the forms or landing pages themselves, it is simply a matter of another person's cookie being placed on the browser by the forwarded email tracking link.  
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Issue Can the {{system.unsubscribeLink}} be customized to point to a different page, such as a preference center?     Solution Issue Resolution The system token unsubscribe link  will always behave the same way, and it cannot be customized.  The {{system.unsubscribeLink}} will always bring you to: sub.domain/UnsubscribePage.html. If your Landing Pages are not branded, this system token will still behave the same way and take the lead to your out-of-the-box Marketo Unsubscribe Page (ending in /UnsubscribePage.html). If you want the link to go to a different page, the easiest workaround is to create a redirect rule that sends visitors to UnsubscribePage.html to your custom page instead.
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Issue Clicking on a link in a Marketo e-mail that re-directs to a non-Marketo webpage destination does not open the page.     Solution Complete the troubleshooting step below. If they do not resolve the issue, include the results in a Marketo Support Ticket. Check the CNAME is correctly setup for the email tracking link  Check that the Default Branding Name matches the CNAME in Step 1 (check for typos).  If you are unsure you can visit CNAME lookup on mxtoolbox and enter the default branding name to check. Under the Domain field enter your default branding name. Do you have SSL for tracking links enabled? If Yes, tracking links in emails should start with HTTPS:// If No, tracking links in emails should start with HTTP://   If you do not have SSL enabled, but when you click the link it resolves to HTTPS://,try a different network and see if it still occurs. Your network may be configured to automatically use HTTPS automatically even if the link is specified as HTTP. (Check with your network admin)   If you are re-directed to the non-Marketo landing page but the page does not load: Check with the website admin if there are any redirect rules setup on the website. Try cutting out parts of the additional URL Parameter to see if that fixes the issue to identify which part of the URL parameter is causing it. Sometimes lead tokens or the mkt_tok may affect a redirect rule, since mkt_tok generates random characters and sometimes the token contains percentage '%' characters. It very common for websites to interpret a % followed by a character as an encoding. Seen in this website here   If you are unable to resolve the issue in the steps above, provide the test results and information in a Marketo Support Case.
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Issue The "mailto: example@marketo.com" link in an email should open an email with pre-filled "To address" (mailto address) but nothing happens when the link is clicked Solution Turn off tracking for mailto: links.  Refer this article for more information on how mailto: links works and why tracking links will break it:  http://blog.teknkl.com/stop-trying-to-track-mailto-links-if-you-want-them-to-work/.  
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