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Issue Links sent to a customer using AppleMail are not rendering properly. Solution This issue is cause when there is no protocol assigned to a link so AppleMail appends applewebdata:// to the beginning of the url instead of HTTP:// or HTTPS:// The work-around for this is to include the protocol in the link. If there's no protocol (e.g. http:// ) then the rendering engine will insert applewebdata:// as the protocol for any links.     
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Issue Best practices for avoiding corruption in cloned assets. Solution When cloning assets you should always clone from the original asset. Say that you have email A, and you clone that original email into version B, and then clone version B into C, and clone C into D, etc.  There is potential for asset corruption when clones are cloned repeatedly. It is best to clone the original rather than making clones of clones. When creating assets, whether they are individual assets like emails or complex assets like programs, set one as the master asset and clone all copies from the master.
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  So you’ve now used the previous document (Getting Started With Guided Landing Pages:) to download a template from our library and set it up in your Marketo instance, you have even used it to make a landing page or two and you’ve customized those landing pages, AND you’ve even gone the extra mile and customized your template and modified some elements! (Editing Marketo Guided Landing Page Templates, Pt. 1 - Elements:) All of which is fantastic news! Good job!   But if you recall from the article that showed you how to edit Elements on the template, I skipped right over the section on Variables. This is the piece that this document is designed to tackle.   So what is a variable? If you edit a Guided Landing Page you will see a panel on the right hand side that displays both Elements and Variables. In this instance, the variables do everything from assigning a gradient color, to deciding if you want to display or hide different sections of the landing page.   Modifying a variable in the landing page editor is designed to be really simple, just click the variable you want to change and give it a new value. Here I changed the Primary Gradient 1 and 2 from 1DA083 and 0F3450 to A00E35 and F2F2F2 respectively and the landing page changes:   At its easiest to understand, a variable works a lot like a token in an email. It’s a placeholder for actual code to be used later. So if I create an email that starts with “Hello, {{lead.firstname:default=Friend}}!” you can tell right away what that’s going to do. Pull the first name from the lead record, if none exists use the word “Friend”.   Think of a Variable as a token that you get to define as well as use. The first step is to define it and the second step is to actually call back to the variable you defined.   While it’s easy for a non-technical user to use a variable (as it should be!), setting one up in the template does require a fair amount of HTML knowledge. As stated before, if you are not comfortable editing HTML and do not have a resource available to you, please reach out to services@marketo.com, they are able to assist with any sort of coding needs.   So as before, let’s dive into the template, this time we’re going straight for the Variable code.       <!-- Marketo Variable Definitions -->     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient1" mktoName="Primary Gradient 1" default="#1da083">     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient2" mktoName="Primary Gradient 2" default="#0f3450">   So right at the start of the template, we’re off to the races defining variables. As you can see with the Gradient 1 and Gradient 2, these are both marked with a class of “mktoColor”.   As with the Elements, the full list of Variable types can be found here: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Create+a+Guided+Landing+Page+Template        class : "mktoString"      class : "mktoColor"      class : "mktoBoolean"   A string is a variable that contains a value, Color should be obvious what that does and Boolean is a yes or no choice.   In addition to the class, each variable has to have a unique ID. This is critical and used when the variable is called later on down the page. When you call a variable it’s always with the syntax of ${id name}. So in this case ${gradient1} and ${gradient2}. As you can see it looks a LOT like a token but it’s a token you can name whatever you want.   The mktoName is how it displays the variable in the Landing Page editor.   The default value is what it starts out with.   So let’s take a look and see how these Gradients are applied now that they’re defined at the top of the template.   Color is typically used in the CSS portion of the header. As defined in the previous document, CSS stands for “Cascading Style Sheets” and is a way of formatting the same thing over and over again, kind of like setting a font in a word processor.       /* Header Gradient */     #is {         top: 0;         width: 100%;         min-height: 620px;         position: relative;         z-index: 1;         color: #fff; padding-top: 10%;                 background-image: linear-gradient(${gradient1},${gradient2});     }   Now normally in CSS, the linear-gradient option would have two colors listed, the top color and the bottom color and it provides a gradual transition from one to the other.   We could just as easily change this in the template to        background-image: linear-gradient(red,white);   But the problem doing that is that an end user, who is only using the Landing Page Editor, would not be able to change it. The gradient would be defined in the template and inaccessible to the Editor.   Changing these values to the variables defined before allows the user to change the first and second colors in the Landing Page editor interface.   In Summary:   The Meta Tags define what the variables mean:     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient1" mktoName="Primary Gradient 1" default="#1da083">     <meta class="mktoColor" id="gradient2" mktoName="Primary Gradient 2" default="#0f3450">   The ID= is then used to call the variable and put it into action:       background-image: linear-gradient(${gradient1},${gradient2});   The other benefit to doing it this way is you can re-use the same variable over and over again. Look at this piece of CSS:   body {                 background: ${gradient2};         margin: 0;         color: #696E74;     }   That’s the same ID as the gradient we used before, only applied to a different section. This ensures that the bottom color of the gradient and the background of this section will always be the same color.   Any item in the CSS that contains a text value, a color value or a yes/no choice can be converted to a Variable.   Here’s another common usage:   You’re using a form on your landing page, but you want the end user to be able to change the text on the submit button.   As before you define the variable:        <meta class="mktoString" id="section4ButtonLabel" mktoName="Sec. 4 Button Label" default="More Questions?">   Then farther down the page where the button appears you call the variable you defined before:        <div class="centered mtb">           <a href="${section4ButtonLink}"><button class="btn btn-lg btn-green mt">           ${section4ButtonLabel}</button></a>      </div>   The <a href= is pulling a http link that the user can define in the editor, the button class is setting up a green button as defined in the CSS, and there is our Variable to display the label which reads “More Questions?” Here’s what it looks like in the editor:   So this is great, and it makes sense because you can see this was all set up and defined by a professional. What if you wanted to add your own? Is that even possible?   Naturally it is!   First, figure out what you want to convert to a Variable. Is it a piece of text like a button name or a link? Is it a color? Is it a yes/no choice?   Let’s say we want to add a variable that controls the color of the buttons. We have two, both using the same color green, and we want whoever is running the landing page editor to change that without having to go to the template:   Step 1: Define your variable:        <meta class="mktoColor" id="ButtonColor" mktoName="Button Color" default="#1DA083">   We’re talking about colors so the class will be “mktoColor”. The ID can be anything we want it to be as can be the mktoName. The default is the same lovely green shade as was used before.   Now we need to call this color.  Looking at the CSS, we can see the .btn-green is defined as this:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: #1da083;           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }   The background is the color we want to change to a Variable so it can be edited without having to access the template.   Change the code to this:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: ${ButtonColor};           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }     Approve the template and check out the landing page in the editor:     Well that’s fantastic, but there’s a separate color for the border, we could just as easily add a variable for it as well:        border: 4px solid #1da083;   We don’t want to HAVE to add another new variable for just the border. We could change the border at the same time as the button. By changing #1da083; to ${ButtonColor};   The trick now becomes what if you change your mind? What if you have a variable in the template that is no longer desired? How do you get rid of it?   Remember each variable is two pieces, the definition and the call. You have to remove BOTH pieces. Technically removing the call would be enough to prevent the change from being made on the page, but the definition is what makes the variable appear in the Landing Page Editor, if you only removed the call then there would be a non-functional Variable in the landing page editor.   So in the case of our button color:   Step 1 would be to strip out the meta tag containing the definition:     Step 2 would be changing the variable name where it’s being used to some fixed value:        .btn-green {           border: 4px solid #1da083;           border-radius: 60px;           color: #fff;           background: ${ButtonColor}; -> change this to some other fixed color. #00FF33; or the original #1da083;.           -webkit-transition: none;           -moz-transition: none;           transition: none;      }   Doing both pieces will prevent the Variable from being listed in the Landing Page Editor and prevent it from having any effect on the page.  
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  Marketo now fully supports responsive landing pages, we call the new style a "Guided Landing Page". A Guided Landing Page is one that is capable of dynamically resizing itself for different window sizes and devices. If you’ve used the Marketo interface to set up an Email Template and an Email, the basic concept of setting up a responsive template and landing page will feel pretty familiar.   First you have to define a template that contains the editable areas of the landing page, once that is completed you use that template to build the landing page. Unlike the Email editor however, constructing and altering a responsive landing page template will require a minor amount of HTML knowledge.   If you are not comfortable in HTML and do not have an HTML developer available to assist you, Marketo’s services team can help! You can reach them at services@marketo.com   To get started, first visit our Template Library for Guided Landing Page Templates located here: https://docs.marketo.com/display/public/DOCS/Guided+Landing+Page+Templates;jsessionid=5D71353C1CBF708DEC3DAB1588E78B4F     Select the template you’d like to use, right click the link and select “Save Link As” to download the HTML code.   Once the template is saved locally on your computer, go to where it’s saved and open it in the text editor of your choice. What you’ll see is a whole bunch of HTML:     In your text editor, use CTRL-A to select all and CTRL-C to copy it to the clip-board. (On a Mac this is Command-A and Command-C) then log on to your Marketo instance.   In your Marketo instance, go to the Design Studio and select “New Landing Page Template”     In the New Landing Page Template window, assign your template a folder and a name, then make sure the editing mode is “Guided”. The “Free-form” mode is for the non-responsive templates that we had before. Click “Create”!     Now we’re ready to replace the sample template code with the code you downloaded from the Template Library.   CTRL-A (Command-A on a Mac) will select the starter code and CTRL-V (Command-V) will paste the template code right over the top of the existing code. The template will save itself automatically when finished.     Now that the template is ready to go, we’re ready to see it in action!   Using a Marketo Guided Landing Page Template:   Now that we have a template created, we’re ready to start using it. Close the template tab where the code is and go back to the Design Studio.   Select the template you just created and approve it.     Once the template is approved, you can use it to create a landing page. In the new landing page window, assign a folder and a name and select the template you just created. Click “Create”!   You can always identify which templates are responsive and which are not by looking for a little window icon on the right hand side. If the window icon is present then that template was created using the new Guided editor and is fully responsive. If the window is not present, then that template was created using the old editor and it’s NOT responsive. You cannot automatically convert an old non-responsive template to a new one.   Congratulations! Your new responsive template is ready to use!   Please see our documentation here on how to edit a Guided Landing Page:   https://docs.marketo.com/pages/releaseview.action?pageId=7515306      
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  If you have submitted a support case and you feel that the case was improperly handled or that the solution being offered does not meet the communicated Marketo support expectations, then we would welcome the opportunity to look deeper at your specific support engagement and work with you on delivering a better resolution. Caution: If the item you're looking to escalate is related to a Production Down incident, please call the support line for your region to receive immediate assistance. Support Manager escalations are only handled during normal business hours. The phone numbers for each region are listed below, follow the prompts for P1: Americas: +1.877.270.6586, Direct: +1.650.376.2303 Europe, Middle East, & Africa: +353 (0)1 242 3030,  UK: 0800 151 3030 Asia Pacific: +61 2 8310 7646  Japan: +81.03.4233.9014 How to Escalate: Option 1: Step 1. Navigate to the "Case Management" area of the support portal either by mousing over the Support tab and selecting "Case Management" or clicking the Support tab and click on the “My Case Management” button. NOTE: You will need an open or recently closed case in order to escalate to support leadership. Step 2. From here you will need to click on either an open or a recently closed* case: *Support Cases that have been closed for longer than 10 days are no longer eligible to be re-opened and we ask that you open a new support ticket for your current issue prior to escalating to a Support Manager. We ask that you have an open support ticket for a Support Manager to be able to address specific issues. Step 3. After selecting a case, click on the Escalate to Manager button: Step 4. A pop up will display and you will need to the purpose for the escalation and click on the “Escalate” button. Once your support escalation case has been submitted a Marketo Support Manager will contact you within 1 business day of your support region's support hours to address the issue. Option 2: You can email supportescalations@marketo.com to escalate your issues to our support management team.  NOTE: Be sure to include your currently open Support Case number and the details of your escalation. This will help to ensure that a Support Manager can quickly identify the case tied to your escalation and follow up with you. Before you send an email to supportescalations@marketo.com you must have a current active support case closed support case that has been closed or is pending.  Support Escalations are focused on the handling of current or recent cases.  Brand new technical support issues that are sent to Support Escalations will be re-routed to our general case flow.    
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Marketo offers a number of ways to contact Marketo Support directly for assistance from our different support regions.   Support Portal (https://support.marketo.com)   The Marketo Support Portal features a web form submission to submit support cases to Marketo Support.  The form gives authorized support contacts the ability to provide details on the support issue that allows Marketo Support to efficiently and effectively assign your case to the best suited available support engineer.   Email to Case Submission Authorized Support Contacts can email their cases to: support@marketo.com Reminder: Cases submitted by email are all submitted with a P3 Priority   Regional Phone Contact Information Marketo does feature the tried and true means of contact support, by the phone.  Authorized Support contacts with any support entitlement of Business level or higher can contact Marketo Support by calling one of the regional phone numbers listed below.   Region Contact Details Observed Holidays North America Hours: M-F, 6am to 6pm Pacific Toll Free US: +1 877 270 6586 Direct: +1 650 376 2303 Languages Supported: English, Spanish New Year's Eve and Day Independence Day Thanksgiving Day and the Day After Christmas Eve and Day Europe, Middle East, Africa Hours: M-F, 8am to 5pm GMT Europe: +353 (0)1 511 9556 UK: 0800 151 3030   Languages Supported: English, French, German, Portuguese New Year's Eve and Day Easter Monday Christmas Eve and Day St. Stephen's Day Asia Pacific Hours: M-F, 9am to 6pm AET ANZ: +61 2 8310 7646 Language Supported: English New Year's Day Good Friday Easter (following Monday) ANZAC Day Christmas Day Boxing Day Japan Hours: M-F, 9am to 6pm JST JPN: +81 3 6478 6080 Language Supported: Japanese New Year's Day Coming of Age Day National Foundation Day Emperor's Birthday Spring Equinox Showa Day Constitution Memorial Day Greenery Day Children's Day Marine Day Health and Sports Day Respect for the Aged day Fall Equinox Labor Thanksgiving Day
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Issue The URL for the landing page shows as "https" even though you do not have SSL set up on your Marketo instance, causing the browser to display a "Not Secure" warning.   Solution This can happen if the primary domain and DNS are SSL secure, but Marketo is not.  For instance, if your primary domain is " https://www.mycompany.com " (SSL secure) then the DNS, which is also SSL secure, will push down the "https" transfer protocol down to all the CNAMEs on that DNS.  This will force the Marketo landing page using the CNAME to use "https" in the URL, even though it is not secure. There are two ways to resolve this: Work with your IT department to see if there is a non-SSL option for your DNS Purchase SSL for your Marketo instance so that both your primary domain and your Marketo pages are SSL secure. If you would like to add SSL to your Marketo instance, please contact your Account Manager to see about adding that to your subscription.     
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