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Full Details of all Marketo Support Offerings:   Support Levels Offered Service Level Response Targets   Global Contact   https://support.marketo.com :             Online Support Portal for Case management and Knowledgebase search support@marketo.com :                     Email to Case Submission supportescalations@marketo.com :   Contact Support management regarding Support services marketocares@marketo.com :            Questions regarding Support or Community access   Regional Contact Information Americas: Hours: M-F, 6am to 6pm Pacific Toll Free US: +1 877 270 6586 Direct: +1 650 376 2303   Languages Supported: English, Spanish Observed Holidays: New Year's Day Independence Day Thanksgiving Day and the Day After Christmas Day New Year's Eve Europe, Middle East, & Africa: Hours: M-F, 8am to 5pm GMT Europe: +353 (0)1 511 9556 UK: 0800 151 3030   Languages Supported: English, French, German, Portuguese Observed Holidays: New Year's Day Easter Monday Christmas Day St. Stephen's Day Australia Hours: M-F, 9am to 6pm AET ANZ: +61 2 8310 7646   Languages Supported: English Observed Holidays: New Year's Day                            ANZAC Day Christmas Day                             Good Friday Easter Monday                             Boxing Day Japan: Hours: M-F, 9am to 6pm JST JP: +81.03.4233.9014   Languages Supported: Japanese Observed Holidays: New Year's Holiday                      Marine Day Coming of Age Day                      Respect for Senior Citizens Day National Founding Day                National Holiday Spring Equinox Day                     Autumnal Equinox Day Day of Showa                              Sports Day Constitution Memorial Day          Culture Day Green Day                                   Labor Thanksgiving Day Children's Day                             Emperor's Birthday Substitute Public Holiday             Year End After-hours Support for Production Down Issues: Online: Enter a Support Portal Case with Priority=P1 Phone: Call Support Line and follow the P1 prompts   Initial Response SLT We ask that you use the following priority definitions when setting your case priority: Priority Description P1 Mission Critical: Core Business function down or potential loss of mission critical data P2 Urgent: Major feature or workflow is not functioning, mission critical workflow and majority of user community is not blocked P3 Important: Normal usability or task completion is impacted but functional or workaround is available P4 Minor: Minor issue requiring a correction, normal workflow is not impacted
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Setting an email to "operational" does the following No unsubscribe link automatically added Email will be sent to leads set to Unsubscribed Email will be sent to leads set to Marketing Suspended   Note - when sending an operational message, Unsubscribed and Marketing Suspended leads will still be included in the "blocked from email" count on the schedule tab of the campaign.   When is it OK to use the operational setting?   Sending marketing email to unsubscribed addresses is illegal. For this reason, you should be extremely careful to only use this setting in extremely limited circumstances. Using this setting incorrectly violates Marketo's Terms of Service, and most antispam laws. There may be legal consequences for using this setting incorrectly. Good uses of the operational setting fall into two categories: Transactional messages Relationship messages   What's a transactional message? A transactional message is part of a transaction that a lead has initiated and you are responding to. Here's some examples of transactional messages: Receipts for purchases Registration confirmations Download links in response to form fill-outs Requested assets (whitepapers, spec sheets, etc.)   What's a relationship message? A relationship message describes something that affects your business relationship with the lead. Here's some examples of relationship messages: Downtime notifications Changes to terms of service Recall notices End of service notifications   Operational messages should not contain any marketing content at all. In other words, do not use the operational setting to send a message that contains a receipt and a promotion, only a receipt.
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Overview   A blocklist is a database of IP addresses or domains that have been associated with the sending of unsolicited commercial email or spam.  Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and business email networks use information from blocklists to filter out unwanted email.  As a result there can be a drop in inbox delivery rates or overall delivery rates if the IPs or domains involved with sending email are listed on a blocklist. Marketo’s Email Delivery and Compliance team monitors blocklist activity on our IPs and domains daily. When we are alerted to a listing we reach out to the blocklist, attempt to identify the sender that triggered it, and work with the blocklist organization to get the listing resolved. There are thousands of blocklists out there most will not have a significant impact on your delivery rates. Below we have compiled a list of the blpcklists that our customers most commonly encounter. Tier 1 Blocklist Spamhaus​ Impact: Spamhaus is the only blocklist that we categorize as a tier 1 for a reason: it has by far the greatest impact on delivery of all of the blocklists. It is the most well-respected and widely used blocklist in the world. A listing at Spamhaus will have a negative effect on your ability to deliver emails to your customer’s inbox and can cause bounce rates of over 50%.  Evidence suggests that most of the top North American ISPs use Spamhaus to inform blocking decisions. How it works: Unlike many blocklists, Spamhaus lists senders manually. This means that they are proactively watching sender activity, collecting data, and basing the listings on a number of variables. Most commonly senders are listed for mailing to spam trap addresses that Spamhaus owns. Sometimes Spamhaus will list senders based on recipient feedback as well. Next steps: Our team monitors closely for Spamhaus listings. When we see a listing we immediately alert the customer and contact Spamhaus to start the remediation process. Listings last until Spamhaus is satisfied that the offending sender has taken the appropriate steps to mitigate the problem.   Tier 2 Blocklists SpamCop Impact: SpamCop is not used by any of the major North American ISPs to inform blocking decisions but it makes it to the Tier 2 list because it can have a significant impact on B2B email campaigns. How it works: SpamCop lists IPs for one of two reasons: Either the email hit SpamCop spam trap addresses OR A SpamCop user has reported the email unwanted. Most of SpamCop’s spam traps are previously valid addresses that have not been active for 12 months or longer. Next steps: SpamCop is a dynamic blocklist, listings typically resolve themselves within one business day.  There is no action you will need to take to action the delisting with SpamCop, the Privacy Team researches every SpamCop listing and will request delistings when an alert is received that an IP is listed. If your email activity triggered a SpamCop listing it likely means that you have a list management problem that should be addressed. Manitu Impact: Manitu is a German blocklist and has a wide footprint in Europe.  Email senders with European audiences tend to encounter this blocklist most frequently. Manitu is not used by North American ISPs to inform blocklist decisions but if you’re sending to Europe a listing could be problematic. How it works: Listings are automatically activated when a sender mails to a Manitu owned spam trap address. Next steps: The Privacy Team researches and requests delisting when an alert is received that a Marketo IP is listed.  By working with this blocklist the Privacy Team is usually able to identify the customer and let them know that email activity from their subscription triggered a listing. Because Manitu operates solely on the use of spam trap addresses, getting listed by Manitu is a clear indication that senders need to audit their mailing lists.   Tier 3 Blocklists      SORBS   Impact: The impact of a listing at SORBS is very minimal. How it works: SORBS uses several methods to identify potential spammers. Most of their lists use spam traps to identify problematic senders. But SORBS will also list a sender based on their own user complaints, if SORBS administrators have received spam from the sender, or if they identify other high-level sending behavior patterns characteristic of spammers. Next steps: The Privacy Team monitors SORBS activity and makes delisting requests for Marketo IPs as necessary. Oftentimes, SORBS will refuse to delist within a certain timeframe based on the severity of the issue.  Sometimes this can be up to several weeks.   UCEPROTECT Impact: The impact of a listing at UCEPROTECT is very minimal, though the blocklist has a greater footprint in Europe. The organization does not have a good reputation in the industry because they charge senders to request delisting. How it works: UCEPROTECT lists IPs that send mail to their spam trap addresses. Next steps: We ignore these listings because the only way to have them removed is to pay. The pay-to-delist model is not well respected in the email industry so UCEPROTECT has a very limited reach.   ISP Blocklists   Some ISPs have their own blocklists that they use to inform blocking decisions. A few examples are Comcast and Verizon. If your IP is being blocked by one of these networks, and those networks have a large presence in your lists, a block of this kind could have a noticeable negative impact on delivery. Marketo monitors for this type of ISP specific blocklisting and the the Privacy Team works to resolve these as soon as possible. Usually blocks at Comcast and Verizon are resolved within less than 24 hours of a delisting request.   Additional Resources: Blocklist Deep Dive​ Abuse Report Deep Dive​ What is a spamtrap, or spam trap, and why does it matter? Blocklist remediation Blocklist resolution flowchart Successful lead reconfirmation What is a blocklist?
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Quick points: *Spamtraps are addresses owned by antispam organizations *Emailing a spamtrap (usually) gets your IP or domain blacklisted *Maintain current, direct opt-in with an active lead database to avoid this Is this article helpful ? YesNo What is a spam trap or spamtrap?   A spam trap, or spamtrap is an email address secretly owned by an antispam organization that is used to detect spam. Antispam organizations do not sign up for mailing lists, so they consider any email sent to these addresses to be spam. Once email is sent to the spamtrap, the antispam organization that owns this address will blacklist the IP that sent the email (or, less often, domains that are linked in the message).   Email administrators purchase subscriptions to various blacklists, and use the lists to block all incoming email from listed IPs or containing listed domains. From the marketer’s perspective, this can mean a high number of bounced emails leading to low lead engagement, and ultimately to weak revenue performance.   There are two types of spamtraps – pristine traps, and repurposed/recycled traps. A pristine trap is an email address that was never used by a person. A repurposed trap is an email address that once belonged to someone but is no longer a valid address; these addresses will bounce as bad addresses for at least six months before an antispam organization will turn them into live traps.   How can a spamtrap get into my Marketo lead database?   Purchased data   Purchased data is unreliable. The antispam world does not like the use of purchased data so antispam administrators have made a concerted effort to get spamtrap addresses into the databases of data vendors. While data vendors may say they provide opt-in data in reality consent should be direct to your company. Sending unsolicited email is prohibited by the Marketo Terms of Use because this practice has a high risk of causing blacklist issues that can destroy deliverability for multiple Marketo customers. To avoid spam traps get direct opt-in before sending email. If you have purchased data in the past we recommend setting any inactive purchased leads to marketing suspended or simply removing them from your database. Old data Repurposed traps are email addresses that were once valid but are now owned by an antispam organization. This can happen when a company goes out of business; expired domains are often purchased by antispam organizations. Sometimes a company that has a direct partnership with an antispam organization will allow email addresses of former employees or users to become spamtraps. Because antispam organizations will generally make sure future spam traps return a bounce as bad addresses for at least six months before they become spam traps you can prevent repurposed traps in your database by emailing remaining engaged with everyone in your database at least once every six months. Avoid “wake the dead” campaigns to addresses you have not contacted in more than six months. Unconfirmed form entries People can unintentionally enter spamtrap addresses into forms either by making a typo or by intentionally using a fake email address that happens to be a spamtrap. If you use single opt-in, you may add spamtraps to your mailing list. This is more likely to happen if you are a B2C company or if someone thinks they can get whitepapers or free trials simply by filling out a form with made-up information.   How can I identify spamtrap addresses?   Spamtrap addresses are considered trade secrets by the antispam organizations. They do not share these addresses because their goal is for senders to change their mailing practices rather than to simply remove spamtraps from their mailing lists.   That said, one thing we do know about spamtraps is that they tend to be automated processes and do not engage. Spamtraps do not click links. You can use smart list filters to identify inactive leads in Marketo.   How can I prevent spamtraps in my database? Maintain active, direct opt-in for all leads. Don’t purchase data (to grow your list, sponsor events, use list rental services that send the first message for you, or use co-branded content that sends you only good leads) Email everyone you want to email at least once every six months Don’t add old data directly to your mailing list (if you need to, add in small batches and send a welcome email with a slightly different subject to each batch) Regularly clean your database of inactive leads Grant access to assets such as free trials and whitepapers as email links to discourage intentional use of fake email addresses on forms Use scripting on your forms to identify potential typos
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Issue Description You have a lead that is marked as Email Suspended and you are not sure whether they can receive Marketo emails or not.   Issue Resolution When emails bounce as spam, the lead that bounced is set to "Email Suspended." "Email Suspended" is a historical field.  A more accurate name for this field would probably be "This email was suspended at some point in its history."  The actual suspension only lasts 24 hours. To see if the lead is currently suspended, check the timestamp on the 'Email Suspended' field.  If it is more than 24 hours ago, the lead is not currently suspended and can receive email from your Marketo instance.  However, the "Email Suspended" flag will remain on the lead record for the purposes of future troubleshooting.  It is not possible to set "Email Suspended" to "false" once it has been set to "true."  The "Email Suspended Cause" field will provide the bounce message associated with the most recent spam bounce. Is this article helpful ? YesNo
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If you sent an email from the Lead Database (as a Single Flow Action), as part of a campaign, or as a test email but didn't receive it, here are some tips. Check the "From:" address When sending a test message, make sure to check the "From:" address setting on your message. To do this, go to the Email Settings tab of the email editor. In the "From:" field, make sure that you either have a single valid email address, or a valid email address as the default. Many people want to send their messages from the lead owner. When you use the send test feature, the email address you are sending to doesn't have a full lead record, and so it doesn't have a lead owner. Since Marketo cannot send an email with no "From:" address, test messages without a valid email address in the "From:" field will not send. Send as a Lead If you have verified that the email had a valid From: address and you still aren't getting it, make sure to create yourself as a lead and send using a flow action. See if the mail was sent If you sent the email as part of a campaign or Single Flow Action, check the campaign's Results tab or your lead detail page to see if that mail was already sent to you. If it hasn't been sent yet, try waiting a little while longer. Check your Junk Mail In your email client, check your Junk Mail or Spam folder to see if the mail landed there. If it did, you should change the content of your email. Check your corporate spam filter Your corporate mail server may have blocked emails from Marketo; you should contact your IT department to see if this is the case. Please see our instructions for whitelisting Marketo's email servers: Add Marketo to Your Corporate Email Whitelist​ Try sending to a different recipient If you sent the original mail to your corporate account, try sending to a personal account on Yahoo or Gmail. If you sent it to a personal account, try your corporate mail account.  Use Marketo's Email Deliverability product The Email Deliverability PowerPack , with Design Informant and Inbox Informant, can warn you when your mail is being rejected because of its content and help you identify junk mail pitfalls. Also, using Domain Keys and SPF improve the chances of your email landing in your leads' inboxes. Contact Marketo If you still can't figure out what happened contact Marketo to see if we can help.
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When using Marketo it is not a requirement to set up DNS text records for SPF and DKIM.  However, Marketo recommends setting up SPF and DKIM because it improves the deliverability of your mailings.  Configuring and implementing one or both of these records is a way to verify that the server sending your mail is authorized to do so. If a recipient domain is configured to check for SPF and/or DKIM and those DNS records are available and your mail passes the SPF/DKIM check, it further reinforces its good reputation.  Not implementing SPF/DKIM records does not add to or subtract from its reputation, it’s just not there. Please note, not all domains check for SPF/DKIM and if this is the case, again, the presence of these records does not add or subtract from your mail’s deliverability. There is no negative effect to setting up these records, and it can improve your deliverability.  It is for these reasons that Marketo recommends setting up these DNS records and configuring their use in your instance of Marketo. For more information on how to set up and configure SPF/DKIM, please read our KB article here.
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Issue If your IT department or a client asks for your Marketo dedicated sending IP address in order to whitelist your marketing emails, here is how you can find it.     Solution Your Marketo instance's dedicated IP address can be found by sending yourself a live version of one of your Marketo emails, then checking the message headers for the IP address that it was sent from.  It should also be included in the original documentation that Marketo's deliverability team would have provided you when the dedicated IP was set up.  If you are unable to locate the IP address in the emails, or are unable to find your original documentation, please reach out to Marketo Support and we can look it up for you.   Who This Solution Applies To Customers with a dedicated sending IP
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Issue You had an email send and are now seeing in an Email Performance Report that there are Pending emails, a few hours after initiating the program/campaign.     Solution "Pending" generally means that Marketo is attempting to deliver a message. Marketo will try to send a message, but can receive a temporary bounce (essentially "Thanks, try again later"). When that happens, the mail status is set to pending while we retry. We will try to send the message several times over the next 24 hours (36 to AOL) before we accept that the message will not be delivered and change the status to "bounced". Occasionally, other Marketo server issues can cause emails to be stuck in Pending.  If all the emails in Pending are from consumer email addresses, such as Yahoo, Hotmail, or QQ.com, then we are probably just waiting for the receiving server to accept the message.  However, if the pending emails are to a variety of different business domains, please contact Marketo support and we can investigate.
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Syntax Recommendations Common Look Up mechanisms a: mx: include: ip4: ip6: exists: ptr: all Common Modifiers redirect= exp= An A Record must ALWAYS contain IP address (map host to IP) CNAME (Alias) must contain hostnames. No IPs here NS an MX records must contain host names. No IPs allowed. MX records (for mail servers)  should contain hostnames NOT IPs. Too Many Mechanisms Section 10.1, "Processing Limits" of the SPF RFC 4408 specifies the following in regards to DNS lookups: SPF implementations MUST limit the number of mechanisms and modifiers that do DNS lookups to at most 10 per SPF check, including any lookups caused by the use of the "include" mechanism or the "redirect" modifier.  If this number is exceeded during a check, a PermError MUST be returned.  The "include", "a", "mx", "ptr", and "exists" mechanisms as well as the "redirect" modifier do count against this limit.  The "all", "ip4", and "ip6" mechanisms do not require DNS lookups and therefore do not count against this limit. The "exp" modifier does not count against this limit because the DNS lookup to fetch the explanation string occurs after the SPF record has been evaluated. This limit is in place to prevent SPF lookups from being a useful avenue for Denial of Service attacks. Using an example SPF record as an example to illustrate, this record was breaking with 12 look-ups: example.com text = "v=spf1 include:_spf-a.example.com include:_spf-b. example .com include:_spf-c. example .com include:_spf-ssg-a. example .com include:spf-a.another example .com ip4:131.107.115.215 ip4:131.107.115.214 ip4:205.248.106.64 ip4:205.248.106.30 ip4:205.248.106.32 ~all" [ 5 mechanisms] _spf-a.example.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:216.99.5.67 ip4:216.99.5.68 ip4:202.177.148.100 ip4:203.122.32.250 ip4:202.177.148.110 ip4:213.199.128.139 ip4:213.199.128.145 ip4:207.46.50.72 ip4:207.46.50.82 a:mh. example .m0.net ~all"  [ +1 = 6 mechanisms] mh.example.m0.net a = 209.11.164.116 _spf-b.example.com text = "v=spf1 include:spf.messaging.example.com ip4:207.46.22.35 ip4:207.46.22.98 ip4:207.46.22.101 ip4:131.107.1.27 ip4:131.107.1.17 ip4:131.107.65.22 ip4:131.107.65.131 ip4:131.107.1.101 ip4:131.107.1.102 ip4:217.77.141.52 ip4:217.77.141.59 ~all" [+1 = 7 mechanisms] spf.messaging.example.com text = "v=spf1 include:spfa.another example .com include:spfb.anotherexaple.com include:spfc.anotherexample.com -all"  [+3 = 10 mechanisms] spfa.anotherexample.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:157.55.116.128/26 ip4:157.55.133.0/24 ip4:157.55.158.0/23 ip4:157.55.234.0/24 ip4:157.56.112.0/24 ip4:157.56.116.0/25 ip4:157.56.120.0/25 ip4:207.46.100.0/24 ip4:207.46.108.0/25 ip4:207.46.163.0/24 ip4:134.170.140.0/24 ip4:157.56.110.0/23 -all" [+0 = 10 mechanisms] spfb.anotherexample.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:207.46.51.64/26 ip4:213.199.154.0/24 ip4:213.199.180.128/26 ip4:216.32.180.0/23 ip4:64.4.22.64/26 ip4:65.55.83.128/27 ip4:65.55.169.0/24 ip4:65.55.88.0/24 ip4:94.245.120.64/26 ip4:131.107.0.0/16 ip4:157.56.73.0/24 ip4:134.170.132.0/24 -all" [+0 = 10 mechanisms] spfc.anotherexample.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:207.46.101.128/26 ip6:2a01:111:f400:7c00::/54 ip6:2a01:111:f400:fc00::/54 ip4:157.56.87.192/26 ip4:157.55.40.32/27 ip4:157.56.123.0/27 ip4:157.56.91.0/27 ip4:157.55.206.0/24 ip4:157.55.207.0/24 ip4:157.56.206.0/23 ip4:157.56.208.0/22 -all" [ +0 = 10 mechanisms] _spf-c.example.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:203.32.4.25 ip4:213.199.138.181 ip4:213.199.138.191 ip4:207.46.52.71 ip4:207.46.52.79 ip4:131.107.1.18 ip4:131.107.1.19 ip4:131.107.1.20 ip4:131.107.1.48 ip4:131.107.1.56 ip4:86.61.88.25 ip4:131.107.1.44 ip4:131.107.1.37 ~all" [+0 = 10 mechanisms] _spf-ssg-a.example.com   text = "v=spf1 include:_spf-ssg-b.example.com include:_spf-ssg-c. example .com ~all"  [+2 = 12 mechanisms] _spf-ssg-b.example.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:207.68.169.173/30 ip4:207.68.176.1/26 ip4:207.46.132.129/27 ip4:207.68.176.97/27 ip4:65.55.238.129/26 ip4:207.46.222.193/26 ip4:207.46.116.135/29 ip4:65.55.178.129/27 ip4:213.199.161.129/27 ip4:65.55.33.70/28 ~all"  [+0 = 12 mechanisms] _spf-ssg-c.example.com text = "v=spf1 ip4:65.54.121.123/29 ip4:65.55.81.53/28 ip4:65.55.234.192/26 ip4:207.46.200.0/27 ip4:65.55.52.224/27 ip4:94.245.112.10/31 ip4:94.245.112.0/27 ip4:111.221.26.0/27 ip4:207.46.50.221/26 ip4:207.46.50.224 ~all" [+0 = 12 mechanisms] spf-a.secondexample.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:157.55.0.192/26 ip4:157.55.1.128/26 ip4:157.55.2.0/25 ip4:65.54.190.0/24 ip4:65.54.51.64/26 ip4:65.54.61.64/26 ip4:65.55.111.0/24 ip4:65.55.116.0/25 ip4:65.55.34.0/24 ip4:65.55.90.0/24 ip4:65.54.241.0/24 ip4:207.46.117.0/24 ~all" [+0 = 12 mechanisms] Character String Too Long 255 character limitation in a single string https://kb.isc.org/article/AA-00356/0/Can-I-have-a-TXT-or-SPF-record-longer-than-255-characters.html http://www.string-functions.com/length.aspx You may have more than 255 characters of data in a TXT or SPF record, but not more than 255 characters in a single string. If you attempt to create an SPF or TXT record with a long string (>255 characters) in it, BIND will give an error (e.g. "invalid rdata format: ran out of space".)  Strings in SPF and TXT records should be no longer than 255 characters.  However to get around this limitation, per RFC 4408 a TXT or SPF record is allowed to contain multiple strings, which should be concatenated together by the reading application.  In the case of use for SPF (using either TXT or SPF RRs) the strings are concatenated together without spaces as described below.  Reassembly by other applications of multiple strings stored in TXT records might work differently. 3.1.3. Multiple Strings in a Single DNS record As defined in [RFC1035] sections 3.3.14 and 3.3, a single text DNS record (either TXT or SPF RR types) can be composed of more than one string. If a published record contains multiple strings, then the record MUST be treated as if those strings are concatenated together without adding spaces. For example: IN TXT "v=spf1 .... first" "second string..." MUST be treated as equivalent to IN TXT "v=spf1 .... firstsecond string..." SPF or TXT records containing multiple strings are useful in constructing records that would exceed the 255-byte maximum length of a string within a single TXT or SPF RR record. EXAMPLE text = "v=spf1 ip4:199.15.212.0/22 ip4:72.3.185.0/24 ip4:72.32.154.0/24 ip4:72.32.217.0/24 ip4:72.32.243.0/24 ip4:94.236.119.0/26  ip4:37.188.97.188/32 ip4:185.28.196.0/22 ~all“ text = "v=spf1 ip4:199.15.212.0/22“ " ip4:72.3.185.0/24 ip4:72.32.154.0/24 ip4:72.32.217.0/24" " ip4:72.32.243.0/24 ip4:94.236.119.0/26" " ip4:37.188.97.188/32 ip4:185.28.196.0/22 ~all" Null Records in the SPF Record A record that is NULL or that does not exist will break an SPF record.  Syntax within the record is very important, if there are extra spaces between mechanisms it will count as NULL. EXAMPLE text = "v=spf1 ip4:199.15.212.0/22 “ <- accurate text = "v=spf1 ip4: 199.15.212.0/22 “ <- NULL (NOTE the space between IP4: and the IP) Repetitive Records in the SPF Record - Void Lookups If there are too many repetitive mechanisms in the SPF record, including records that cascade (for example when using "include:") the record will break. There is a MAX of 2 void look ups in an SPF record.  More than that and the record will break.  This prevents SPF records from being used in Denial of Service style attacks. Validation Tools SPF checker, syntax validator and SPF tester http://www.kitterman.com/spf/validate.html SPF checker http://vamsoft.com/support/tools/spf-policy-tester SPF validator http://vamsoft.com/support/tools/spf-syntax-validator CIDR Calculator http://www.subnet-calculator.com/cidr.php Nslookup http://network-tools.com/nslook/ SPF creation wizard http://www.microsoft.com/mscorp/safety/content/technologies/senderid/wizard/ Common SPF errors http://www.openspf.org/FAQ/Common_mistakes SPF syntax definitions http://www.openspf.org/SPF_Record_Syntax
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This originally appeared on the Brand Driven Digital blog, 9/19/2013. Written by Marketo's Digital Marketing Evangelist, DJ Waldow. Used with permission. Unemotionally Subscribed – People on your list who have not opened or clicked an email message from you in an extended (several months) period of time. They have not unsubscribed. They have not marked your message as spam. They either ignore it or take the time to actually delete it every time it lands in their inbox. Now, it depends on who you ask, but the percentage of your list that is considered “unemotionally subscribed” can be as high as 30%. Yup. Nearly one out of every three folks on your email list are not interacting with your emails … not at all. As I mentioned in this What Counts guest post, once you figure out who fits this “inactive” criteria, you have a few options: Immediately unsubscribe or delete them. I call this the “DO NOT PASS GO, DO NOT COLLECT $200″ approach. Move to a new list and mail to less frequently. I call this the “I think I need to see you a bit less often” approach. Send a last ditch “We missed you” type email. If they don’t respond, then do #1. I call this the “I’m going to give you one more chance” approach. Set up a re-engagement email series. I call this the “I really don’t want to break up, but if you are not responding at all, well, it’s over” approach. No one method is necessarily better than the other. I’ve seen all 4 executed before. As I often say, the best practice here is the one that’s best for your subscribers (and your business).   I recently came across a great – creative, human, funny – example of #3, the last ditch “we missed you” email. Thanks to Suzanne Oehler who forwarded me this email. Check out this email from NTEN: The Nonprofit Technology Network The subject line – We miss you! - was certainly one that would stand out in many inboxes. The intro paragraph was short and to the point, but nothing crazy.   But then it got fun … and creative.   The first call to action read: “If you’d like to continue receiving NTEN emails, click here by Friday, August 2nd. Yay! This makes us very happy.” Again, they get right to the point. They even add a bit of “human” (Yay! This makes us very happy.) But it gets better. The “click here” link leads to hilarious Happy Dog video. IF you are a dog owner, you’ll love this.   The second call to action read: “If you’d rather not receive NTEN emails, we’re sad to see you go. Simply delete this email and in a short time your account with NTEN will be removed from our systems.” Nothing crazy. Direct. Clear. Simple. However, the “sad” link again goes to a video – this one goes to a Sad Cat Diary video. Warning: some language in this video is NSFW. Then again, if you’ve ever owned a cat, you’ll appreciate the humor.   The third, and final, call to action read: “Of course, if you change your mind, you can always sign up again” with the “sign up” link taking clickers to their email subscription landing page, of course.   Now, fun and creative is one thing. If campaigns like these do not meet their intended goals (getting folks re-engaged), then, well, they are just “fun and creative.”   So … Did It WORK?   I contacted the team at NTEN to see how effective this campaign was. Below is what they shared with me.   They sent this email to a list of 24,000 subscribers who had not opened in email from them in the past year.   For this particular campaign, they reported the following metrics:   Open rate – 38.89% vs. 26.73% “average” over the previous few emails Click-to-Open Rate* – 47.37% vs. 12.3% “average” over the previous few emails *in other words, of the 38.89% who opened the email, nearly 50% clicked at least one link   Of those who clicked a link, the Top 4 most-clicked links were:   41.14%: Click Here (Happy Dog … to stay subscribed) 4.91%: Unsubscribe 2.21%: Sign up 2.14%: Sad (Sad Cat … to opt-out) By all accounts, I’d say this “We Miss You” campaign was a HUGE success? What do you think? Have you tried a “reenagement campaign in the past? If so, how effective was it for you? Drop a note in the comments below!   P.S. The email marketing team at NTEN shared their “lessons learned” from this campaign in this blog post. I love their transparency. Is this article helpful ? YesNo
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  Welcome to Marketo Support This guide provides individual links that covers the following topics: Marketo Support Policies Service Level Agreement How to Contact Marketo Support How to Submit a Case Tips on Effective Case Submission Managing Authorized Support Contacts (Support Admins) Managing Your Cases How to Escalate    
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!!EASTER EGG!! The ball with the Marketo logo in the upper-left corner of the screen is your Superball.  Here's a quick trick to make it bounce like it did when you first got into your Marketo instance: Hold down Ctrl (Command for Macs) + Shift, then hit the 's' key. Happy bouncing!    
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    Overview Add Leads to Static Lists Use Custom Fields Overview Lead records have two primary components – lead attributes and activity logs. Lead attributes are the fields and field values within the lead record. For example, Job Title is a lead attribute. Lead Name is a lead attribute. Activity logs record the actions Marketo or the lead themselves have taken. For example, sending an email to a lead is an activity that would show in the activity log. If the lead opens the email or visits a tracked page, those activities would show in the activity log as well.   Activities in the activity log are only retained for 90 days, 25 months, or 37 if you have purchased the premium data retention option. The official Marketo Data Retention Policy can be found here:  Marketo Activities Data Retention Policy   The main way to store activity data beyond the Data Retention Policy timeframe is to use the Bulk Extract API. There are two other ways you can keep a reference of these activities after the end of the Data Retention period, and they can be referenced within the Marketo UI. This article will show you how that can be done.     Add Leads to Static Lists Static lists will retain lead membership even if the activity of adding the lead to the list has been removed. This will let you have lists dedicated to specific criteria that would otherwise be removed after the data retention time period has been passed.   For example, Smart Campaign membership history is not retained after 25 months. If you are searching for members of a Smart Campaign, but a lead first became a member of the Smart Campaign more than 25 months ago, the search results would not include that lead.   An easy way to work around that is to add your leads to a static list as part of the flow of the campaign. When creating your Smart Campaign, create a new static list with the same corresponding name (makes it easier to identify later). When building the flow of your campaign, add the "Add to List" flow step so that all leads going through the campaign will be logged on the list.         Use Custom Fields Lead attributes and their field values are not affected by the Data Retention Policy. Use Smart Campaigns to populate custom fields with values based on activities your leads take. This will allow you to filter leads by these lead attributes that are not affected by the Data Retention Policy. A side benefit to this is that it is faster to search by lead attributes than by searching through lead activity logs.   Example: This approach can work for many different activities, but let’s use form fill outs as an example.   Let’s say you want to be able to identify leads who have been very active and have filled out more than 5 forms over their lifecycle. You could use the filter “Filled Out Form” with the “Min. Number of Times” constraint set to 5. However, if one of those forms filled out occurred more than 25 months ago, the filter would only be able to access 4 form fill activities in the activity log. Therefore, the lead would not pass the filter.   Instead of using the “Filled Out Form” filter, set up a Smart Campaign to write to custom fields that show you how many forms they’ve filled out, and when the first one was. Here’s how to do it:   1. Create two new custom fields in Marketo, one Score Field, and the second a Date Field.   2. Create a new Smart Campaign   3. Add the trigger “Fills Out Form” set to “is any” to the Campaign Smart List     4. Add these two Flow Steps to the Campaign Flow: Flow Step 1 : “Change Score” Score Field Name: your score field name Change: +1   Flow Step 2 : “Change Data Value” Add Choice to Flow Step Choice 1: If “your score field name”  “is empty” Attribute “your score field name” New Value: {{system.date}} Default Choice: Do Nothing       This campaign will listen for any time a lead fills out a form, add +1 to your score field, and if it’s the very first form they’ve ever filled out, it will log the date of when it was done. If the lead has ever filled out a form in the past, there will already be a date value in the date field, so the flow choice would just skip over it and do nothing.       Results You’ll See: With the original goal of identifying leads who have filled out more than 5 forms you’ll be able to filter for leads that have filled out at least 5 forms. In addition, this campaign will let you search for leads based on when they had filled out their very first form, regardless of how long ago it was. Since it’s stored in a lead field, it’s a lead attribute that is not affected by the Data Retention Policy at all.        
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  This is a article attached image Upon signing a contract with Marketo you are provisioned a Marketo instance and a Support Service. There are four different types of Support Services which are available to meet different customer support needs: Online (Legacy) Business  or PREMIER SUPPORT BUSINESS (Legacy) Premier or PREMIER SUPPORT ENTERPRISE (Legacy) Elite or PREMIER SUPPORT ELITE Each Support Service has a different Service Level Target (SLT). An SLT is the amount of time Marketo Support targets to make first contact with you after a support case has been submitted. SLTs differ for each Support Service and priority level. Priority levels range from Priority P1 to Priority P4. Here are the SLTs and priority levels for each Support Service:   Priority Online (Legacy) Business PREMIER SUPPORT BUSINESS (Legacy) Premier PREMIER SUPPORT ENTERPRISE (Legacy) Elite PREMIER SUPPORT ELITE P1 1 hour 1 hour 1 hour 30 minutes 30 minutes 30 minutes 15 minutes P2 4 hours 3 hours 2 hours 2 hours 1 hour 2 hours 30 minutes P3 6 hours 5 hours 4 hours 4 hours 2 hours 2 hours 1 hour P4 3 days 1 day 1 day 1 day 1 day 1 day 1 day   Here are the descriptions for each priority level: Priority Description P1 Mission Critical:  Core business function down or potential loss of mission critical data P2 Urgent:  Major feature or workflow is not functioning. Mission critical workflow and majority of user community is not blocked P3 Important:  Normal usability or task completion is impacted but functional, or workaround is available P4 Minor:  Minor issue requiring a correction. Normal workflow is not impacted   Find more information About Support here!  
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  Marketo Champions are customers who have demonstrated outstanding leadership in the Marketo Community, are experts in Marketo products, are avid contributors in the social world, and are loyal advocates of the Marketo brand. Benefits and perks our Champions receive include:   Access: Meetings with our product and marketing teams to give exclusive feedback Previews: Given early previews to products, features, and releases when available Publicity: Exclusive speaking opportunities at our annual Marketo Summit and other events Networking: Special networking events with Marketo executives and fellow Champions and semi-annual conference calls Ownership: Ownership of content and exclusive activities at our annual Marketo Summit that showcase your expertise and thought leadership Credibility: Special Champion badge on Marketo Community profiles, and profiled on Marketo's corporate website Sweet Swag: Champion-exclusive swag To find out more information and apply, click here. To view a complete list of current Champions, click here. Join the Marketo Elite Today!  
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As part of your efforts to maintain a healthy inbox delivery rate, you should be monitoring your email bounce rates. If your hard bounce rate climbs above 5%, you should take a closer look at what’s going on. If your hard bounce rate hits 10% or more, you should be concerned about your data quality. If you have a high hard bounce rate, it is likely that you have a high number of invalid addresses. An invalid address is an address that has never existed or no longer exists, so mail will never be delivered to these addresses.  Marketo automatically stops sending to these addresses, so you do not need to worry about suspending or removing them. But having a high invalid address rate could cause you major delivery problems and reputation issues, and could indicate problematic data sources or list segmentation practices that should be reevaluated. A high invalid address rate can lead to outright blocking of your mail at major ISPs. Many ISPs monitor the number of invalid addresses being sent to at their domains by specific senders. Once a certain threshold is hit, those ISPs will block mail coming from the offending sender. ISPs behave this way because they view a high rate of invalid addresses as an indication of problematic data practices of the sender. At best, a high invalid address rate means you are not sending to an engaged, active audience. At worst, it means that you are sending to purchased or rented lists, which is a violation of Marketo’s Email Use and Anti-Spam Policy. Chances are, if you have a high invalid address rate, there are other issues with your data that could also contribute to. If you receive a notification that we have noticed a high invalid address rate associated with your mailings, you should ask yourself some questions about your list management practices. Below are some things to consider: - Have you recently added any new leads or lead sources? Purchased lists are often full of invalid addresses. We often find that purchased lists contain numerous addresses from domains that don’t even exist any more. While you can use purchased lists to bulk up the data you have for existing leads, you cannot use them to bulk up your lead database. -Have you recently targeted old or inactive leads? We strongly recommend that you never send to an address that you haven ’ t mailed to for over a one year. You should be mailing to your contacts at least every six months. This will help prevent high invalid address rates, and will also help keep you and your content fresh in your contacts’ minds. If you do have to send to older leads, you should break up your lists and send to your most recent and active contacts first. - Who are you targeting?  Some senders have more problems with high invalid address rates because of their target audiences. For example, targeting .edu domains often causes high invalid address rates because these are school addresses that have a higher turnover rate. B2B campaigns may sometimes have higher invalid address rates because of similar turnover rates at businesses. The best way to avoid high invalid address rates is to send to opted-in, engaged recipients. To help with this, a lot of senders clear out their inactive leads every six months or so. An inactive lead is a contact that has taken no action in the given time period— they haven't opened an email, clicked a link, visited your webpage, attended a webinar, and so forth. This can help with both your high invalid address rates and spam complaints. Inactive leads are a dangerous group to continue mailing to because their behavior proves that they do not want to interact with your mail, and will therefore likely complain to us or to their ISPs about it. We have a great resource on how to create a Smart List to remove inactive leads here . If you still need some help, please feel free to reach out to our Support team ( support@marketo.com ). Additional resources: Dos and Don'ts of Effective Lead Generation Best Practices for Purchased Data
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An email being filtered to a quarantine or bulk mail folder happens after the recipient mail server has accepted message.  Once an email has been accepted by a mail server, it is impossible to tell where it went or what happened to it.  Note that this is true of any mail sent by any system on the Internet.   Every mail server has configurable filters that determine how received mail will be handled.  The mail server administrator should be able to adjust those filters to ensure delivery of emails based on their business standards, or there may even be end-user-configurable controls that can accomplish the same thing.   If test mailings you are sending to yourself or your colleagues are being filtered to a quarantine or bulk mail folder, you should consider asking your email administrator to whitelist Marketo’s IP ranges.  They can be found here .   You can also improve your deliverability in general by setting up SPF and DKIM records , and branding your tracking links .
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We have enhanced the behavior of the unsubscribe functionality to make it “durable”.  We have added a master email status, which is separate from the unsubscribe flag visible on the lead detail record.   If the unsubscribe flag is set from false to true, the master email status is updated, and the change is propagated to other leads with the same email address. Update the Unsubscribe flag from True to False (e.g. Re-subscribe a lead) When a lead is imported, the unsubscribe flag WILL NOT be overwritten by the import. Here are the ways a lead can be re-subscribed: 1.   In SFDC, uncheck the Email Opt Out field.  This WILL sync to Marketo. 2.   Manually update the lead detail record by un-checking the unsubscribe flag 3.   Run a Change Data Value Flow Action on one or many leads a.  Select the attribute “unsubscribe” and set the value to False 4.   Update an existing lead via SOAP API 5.   Form Field – set a field on a form to set the unsubscribe flag to “false” and this will unsubscribe the lead a. Best practice would be to have text on the form that says that by filling out this form, they are agreeing to receive email communication Creating a New Lead When a new lead is created, we check it against the master email status table.  If the lead was previously unsubscribed, we will update the record to be unsubscribed.   Changing an email address If you change the email address of a lead to an unsubscribed email address, the lead will be unsubscribed.  This change can occur in either Marketo or SFDC. If you change an unsubscribed email address to one that is subscribed, the lead will be subscribed.    
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No, if you have received the blacklist notification, you are not blocked from sending mail.  You can continue to mail while you work through the remediation steps. The only time we will ever block you from sending mail is if you trigger a listing at Spamhaus, the world’s most respected and widely used blacklist. If this happens, you will receive a call or email to let you know what’s going on and we will work with you to resolve the issue. This is a rare occurrence. Additional Resources: Can you give me the spam trap address that triggered the listing? What is a spamtrap, or spam trap, and why does it matter? What is a blacklist? How does Marketo respond to blacklisting and spam notifications? Top blacklists - What you need to know Blacklist Remediation Successful Reconfirmation
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