Knowledgebase

Sort by:
Traditional Bounce Codes When you add the Email Invalid Cause to display as a Column to any of your Deliverability Smartlists, you will see a code value, and potentially a suffix as well, to help you understand the reason for the Bounce.   Codes in the 400 range are generally Soft Bounces Codes in the 500 range are generally Hard Bounces Mail server administrators can create custom messages that accompany bounce codes Code Explanation 250 Mail accepted by receiving network 421 <domain> Service not available, closing transmission channel 450 Requested mail action not taken: mailbox unavailable (e.g., mailbox busy) 451 Requested action aborted: error in processing 452 Requested action not taken: insufficient system storage 500 The server could not recognize the command due to a syntax error. 501 A syntax error was encountered in command arguments. 502 This command is not implemented. 503 The server has encountered a bad sequence of commands. 504 A command parameter is not implemented. 550 User’s mailbox was unavailable (such as not found) 551 The recipient is not local to the server. 552 The action was aborted due to exceeded storage allocation. 553 The command was aborted because the mailbox name is invalid. 554 The transaction failed for some unstated reason.     Enhanced Bounce Codes If a suffix appears after one of the codes above, it is an enhanced Bounce code Mail server administrators can crate custom messages that accompany bounce codes   Code Explanation 5.0.0 Address does not exist 5.1.0 Other address status 5.1.1 Bad destination mailbox address 5.1.2 Bad destination system address 5.1.3 Bad destination mailbox address syntax 5.1.4 Destination mailbox address ambiguous 5.1.5 Destination mailbox address valid 5.1.6 Mailbox has moved 5.1.7 Bad sender’s mailbox address syntax 5.1.8 Bad sender’s system address 5.2.0 Other or undefined mailbox status 5.2.1 Mailbox disabled, not accepting messages 5.2.2 Mailbox full 5.2.3 Message length exceeds administrative limit. 5.2.4 Mailing list expansion problem 5.3.0 Other or undefined mail system status 5.3.1 Mail system full 5.3.2 System not accepting network messages 5.3.3 System not capable of selected features 5.3.4 Message too big for system 5.4.0 Other or undefined network or routing status 5.4.1 No answer from host 5.4.2 Bad connection 5.4.3 Routing server failure 5.4.4 Unable to route 5.4.5 Network congestion 5.4.6 Routing loop detected 5.4.7 Delivery time expired 5.5.0 Other or undefined protocol status 5.5.1 Invalid command 5.5.2 Syntax error 5.5.3 Too many recipients 5.5.4 Invalid command arguments 5.5.5 Wrong protocol version 5.6.0 Other or undefined media error 5.6.1 Media not supported 5.6.2 Conversion required and prohibited 5.6.3 Conversion required but not supported 5.6.4 Conversion with loss performed 5.6.5 Conversion failed 5.7.0 Other or undefined security status 5.7.1 Delivery not authorized, message refused 5.7.2 Mailing list expansion prohibited 5.7.3 Security conversion required but not possible 5.7.4 Security features not supported 5.7.5 Cryptographic failure 5.7.6 Cryptographic algorithm not supported 5.7.7 Message integrity failure   Not all mail servers adhere to these standards.
View full article
Processing feedback from the blacklists is a manual process for Marketo’s Privacy team. While we try to get the reports out to you on a daily basis, sometimes we get back logged and notifications may not go out the same day that you triggered the blacklist.   But not to worry: most blacklists are dynamic, meaning that they resolve themselves after a given time period or when email statistics improve. Typically blacklist issues are resolved after 24 hours, so chances are you are not still being blacklisted.   Still, you need to complete the blacklist remediation program to identify the source of the problem and ensure that this doesn’t happen again. While most blacklist issues resolve themselves, they can have a noticeable impact on deliverability. Furthermore, being blacklisted is an indication that you have a problematic data source in your lists that could lead to even bigger deliverability problems.   For a quick run down of the blacklists that our customers run into trouble with the most, visit our Top Blacklists article.   Additional resources: Blacklists: Frequently Asked Questions Blacklists: Frequently Asked Questions
View full article
No, unfortunately we are unable to tell you what the spam trap address is. We don’t even know it ourselves! Spam trap addresses are proprietary to the blacklists that own them. Anti-spam professionals use spam trap addresses to track unsolicited emails. If a spam trap is known by the offending sender, the sender could simply remove the spam trap address from their lists and never actually address the data problem that caused that spam trap address to be included in their lists to begin with. Instead of asking what the spam trap address is, try to identify the source of the trap address and eliminate bad data sources from your mailing lists. You should be able to identify the email campaign that caused the blacklist issue, so you should start with those lists. To narrow it down and identify the problematic data source, you should consider the following: Have you recently added any new leads or new lead sources? What is the source of these leads? Any purchased or appended email addresses should be removed, because these data sources are often the source of newly introduced spamtraps. In addition, using purchased or appended email addresses for mailing is a violation of Marketo’s Email Use and Anti-Spam Policy. Have you added any older leads that have not been mailed to recently? Some email providers will turn an email address into a spam trap after a year of inactivity. If you have a list of addresses that has not been mailed to in a year or more, this list should be removed. Does your system use any custom fields to indicate customer status, event attendance, recent contact with your sales team, or other forms of engagement? If so, take advantage of this and isolate the inactive or non-responsive segments of your database using all of the activity data you have available. Is there anything about this specific mailing that makes it different compared to your previous email campaigns? Did you send any other mail on the same day? If so, you should compare the recipient lists. Think you have narrowed in on the problem? Check out our guide to blacklist remediation to find out what to do with that bad list and complete the remediation program.   Additional Resources: What is a spamtrap, or spam trap, and why does it matter? What is a blacklist? How does Marketo respond to blacklisting and spam notifications? Top blacklists - What you need to know Blacklist Remediation Successful Reconfirmation Blacklist Deep Dive Blacklist FAQ    
View full article
  Syntax Recommendations Common Look Up mechanisms Common Modifiers Too Many Mechanisms Character String Too Long Null Records in the SPF Record Repetitive Records in the SPF Record - Void Lookups Validation Tools Syntax Recommendations Common Look Up mechanisms a: mx: include: ip4: ip6: exists: ptr: all Common Modifiers redirect= exp=   An A Record must ALWAYS contain IP address (map host to IP) CNAME (Alias) must contain hostnames. No IPs here NS an MX records must contain host names. No IPs allowed. MX records (for mail servers)  should contain hostnames NOT IPs. Too Many Mechanisms Section 10.1, "Processing Limits" of the SPF RFC 4408 specifies the following in regards to DNS lookups: SPF implementations MUST limit the number of mechanisms and modifiers that do DNS lookups to at most 10 per SPF check, including any lookups caused by the use of the "include" mechanism or the "redirect" modifier.  If this number is exceeded during a check, a PermError MUST be returned.  The "include", "a", "mx", "ptr", and "exists" mechanisms as well as the "redirect" modifier do count against this limit.  The "all", "ip4", and "ip6" mechanisms do not require DNS lookups and therefore do not count against this limit. The "exp" modifier does not count against this limit because the DNS lookup to fetch the explanation string occurs after the SPF record has been evaluated. This limit is in place to prevent SPF lookups from being a useful avenue for Denial of Service attacks. Using an example SPF record as an example to illustrate, this record was breaking with 12 look-ups: example.com text = "v=spf1 include:_spf-a.example.com include:_spf-b. example .com include:_spf-c. example .com include:_spf-ssg-a. example .com include:spf-a.another example .com ip4:131.107.115.215 ip4:131.107.115.214 ip4:205.248.106.64 ip4:205.248.106.30 ip4:205.248.106.32 ~all" [ 5 mechanisms] _spf-a.example.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:216.99.5.67 ip4:216.99.5.68 ip4:202.177.148.100 ip4:203.122.32.250 ip4:202.177.148.110 ip4:213.199.128.139 ip4:213.199.128.145 ip4:207.46.50.72 ip4:207.46.50.82 a:mh. example .m0.net ~all"  [ +1 = 6 mechanisms] mh.example.m0.net a = 209.11.164.116 _spf-b.example.com text = "v=spf1 include:spf.messaging.example.com ip4:207.46.22.35 ip4:207.46.22.98 ip4:207.46.22.101 ip4:131.107.1.27 ip4:131.107.1.17 ip4:131.107.65.22 ip4:131.107.65.131 ip4:131.107.1.101 ip4:131.107.1.102 ip4:217.77.141.52 ip4:217.77.141.59 ~all" [+1 = 7 mechanisms] spf.messaging.example.com text = "v=spf1 include:spfa.another example .com include:spfb.anotherexaple.com include:spfc.anotherexample.com -all"  [+3 = 10 mechanisms] spfa.anotherexample.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:157.55.116.128/26 ip4:157.55.133.0/24 ip4:157.55.158.0/23 ip4:157.55.234.0/24 ip4:157.56.112.0/24 ip4:157.56.116.0/25 ip4:157.56.120.0/25 ip4:207.46.100.0/24 ip4:207.46.108.0/25 ip4:207.46.163.0/24 ip4:134.170.140.0/24 ip4:157.56.110.0/23 -all" [+0 = 10 mechanisms] spfb.anotherexample.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:207.46.51.64/26 ip4:213.199.154.0/24 ip4:213.199.180.128/26 ip4:216.32.180.0/23 ip4:64.4.22.64/26 ip4:65.55.83.128/27 ip4:65.55.169.0/24 ip4:65.55.88.0/24 ip4:94.245.120.64/26 ip4:131.107.0.0/16 ip4:157.56.73.0/24 ip4:134.170.132.0/24 -all" [+0 = 10 mechanisms] spfc.anotherexample.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:207.46.101.128/26 ip6:2a01:111:f400:7c00::/54 ip6:2a01:111:f400:fc00::/54 ip4:157.56.87.192/26 ip4:157.55.40.32/27 ip4:157.56.123.0/27 ip4:157.56.91.0/27 ip4:157.55.206.0/24 ip4:157.55.207.0/24 ip4:157.56.206.0/23 ip4:157.56.208.0/22 -all" [ +0 = 10 mechanisms] _spf-c.example.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:203.32.4.25 ip4:213.199.138.181 ip4:213.199.138.191 ip4:207.46.52.71 ip4:207.46.52.79 ip4:131.107.1.18 ip4:131.107.1.19 ip4:131.107.1.20 ip4:131.107.1.48 ip4:131.107.1.56 ip4:86.61.88.25 ip4:131.107.1.44 ip4:131.107.1.37 ~all" [+0 = 10 mechanisms] _spf-ssg-a.example.com   text = "v=spf1 include:_spf-ssg-b.example.com include:_spf-ssg-c. example .com ~all"  [+2 = 12 mechanisms] _spf-ssg-b.example.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:207.68.169.173/30 ip4:207.68.176.1/26 ip4:207.46.132.129/27 ip4:207.68.176.97/27 ip4:65.55.238.129/26 ip4:207.46.222.193/26 ip4:207.46.116.135/29 ip4:65.55.178.129/27 ip4:213.199.161.129/27 ip4:65.55.33.70/28 ~all"  [+0 = 12 mechanisms] _spf-ssg-c.example.com text = "v=spf1 ip4:65.54.121.123/29 ip4:65.55.81.53/28 ip4:65.55.234.192/26 ip4:207.46.200.0/27 ip4:65.55.52.224/27 ip4:94.245.112.10/31 ip4:94.245.112.0/27 ip4:111.221.26.0/27 ip4:207.46.50.221/26 ip4:207.46.50.224 ~all" [+0 = 12 mechanisms] spf-a.secondexample.com   text = "v=spf1 ip4:157.55.0.192/26 ip4:157.55.1.128/26 ip4:157.55.2.0/25 ip4:65.54.190.0/24 ip4:65.54.51.64/26 ip4:65.54.61.64/26 ip4:65.55.111.0/24 ip4:65.55.116.0/25 ip4:65.55.34.0/24 ip4:65.55.90.0/24 ip4:65.54.241.0/24 ip4:207.46.117.0/24 ~all" [+0 = 12 mechanisms] Character String Too Long 255 character limitation in a single string https://kb.isc.org/article/AA-00356/0/Can-I-have-a-TXT-or-SPF-record-longer-than-255-characters.html http://www.string-functions.com/length.aspx You may have more than 255 characters of data in a TXT or SPF record, but not more than 255 characters in a single string. If you attempt to create an SPF or TXT record with a long string (>255 characters) in it, BIND will give an error (e.g. "invalid rdata format: ran out of space".)  Strings in SPF and TXT records should be no longer than 255 characters.  However to get around this limitation, per RFC 4408 a TXT or SPF record is allowed to contain multiple strings, which should be concatenated together by the reading application.  In the case of use for SPF (using either TXT or SPF RRs) the strings are concatenated together without spaces as described below.  Reassembly by other applications of multiple strings stored in TXT records might work differently. 3.1.3. Multiple Strings in a Single DNS record As defined in [RFC1035] sections 3.3.14 and 3.3, a single text DNS record (either TXT or SPF RR types) can be composed of more than one string. If a published record contains multiple strings, then the record MUST be treated as if those strings are concatenated together without adding spaces. For example: IN TXT "v=spf1 .... first" "second string..." MUST be treated as equivalent to IN TXT "v=spf1 .... firstsecond string..." SPF or TXT records containing multiple strings are useful in constructing records that would exceed the 255-byte maximum length of a string within a single TXT or SPF RR record. EXAMPLE text = "v=spf1 ip4:199.15.212.0/22 ip4:72.3.185.0/24 ip4:72.32.154.0/24 ip4:72.32.217.0/24 ip4:72.32.243.0/24 ip4:94.236.119.0/26  ip4:37.188.97.188/32 ip4:185.28.196.0/22 ~all“ text = "v=spf1 ip4:199.15.212.0/22“ " ip4:72.3.185.0/24 ip4:72.32.154.0/24 ip4:72.32.217.0/24" " ip4:72.32.243.0/24 ip4:94.236.119.0/26" " ip4:37.188.97.188/32 ip4:185.28.196.0/22 ~all" Null Records in the SPF Record A record that is NULL or that does not exist will break an SPF record.  Syntax within the record is very important, if there are extra spaces between mechanisms it will count as NULL. EXAMPLE text = "v=spf1 ip4:199.15.212.0/22 “ <- accurate text = "v=spf1 ip4: 199.15.212.0/22 “ <- NULL (NOTE the space between IP4: and the IP) Repetitive Records in the SPF Record - Void Lookups If there are too many repetitive mechanisms in the SPF record, including records that cascade (for example when using "include:") the record will break. There is a MAX of 2 void look ups in an SPF record.  More than that and the record will break.  This prevents SPF records from being used in Denial of Service style attacks. Validation Tools SPF checker, syntax validator and SPF tester http://www.kitterman.com/spf/validate.html SPF checker http://vamsoft.com/support/tools/spf-policy-tester SPF validator http://vamsoft.com/support/tools/spf-syntax-validator CIDR Calculator http://www.subnet-calculator.com/cidr.php Nslookup http://network-tools.com/nslook/ SPF creation wizard http://www.microsoft.com/mscorp/safety/content/technologies/senderid/wizard/ Common SPF errors http://www.openspf.org/FAQ/Common_mistakes SPF syntax definitions http://www.openspf.org/SPF_Record_Syntax
View full article
    Marketo offers a number of ways to contact Marketo Support directly for assistance from our different support regions.   Support Portal (https://support.marketo.com)   The Marketo Support Portal features a web form submission to submit support cases to Marketo Support.  The form gives authorized support contacts the ability to provide details on the support issue that allows Marketo Support to efficiently and effectively assign your case to the best suited available support engineer.     Email to Case Submission   Authorized Support Contacts can email their cases to: support@marketo.com   Reminder: Cases submitted by email are all submitted with a P3 Priority   Regional Phone Contact Information   Marketo does feature the tried and true means of contact support, by the phone.  Authorized Support contacts can contact Marketo Support by calling one of the regional phone numbers listed below.   Region Contact Details Observed Holidays North America Hours: M-F, 6am to 6pm Pacific Toll Free US: +1.877.270.6586 Direct: +1.650.376.2303 New Year's Day Independence Day Thanksgiving Day and the Day After Christmas Day Europe, Middle East, Africa Hours: M-F, 8am to 5pm GMT Europe: +353 (0)1 242 3030 UK: 0800 151 3030   Languages Supported: English, French, German, Portuguese New Year's Day Easter Monday Christmas Day St. Stephen's Day Asia Pacific Hours: M-F, 9am to 6pm Aus EST ANZ: +61 2 9045 2701 New Year's Day ANZAC Day Australia Day Queen's Birthday Labour Day Christmas Day Easter Monday Boxing Day  
View full article
  Overview Add Leads to Static Lists Use Custom Fields Overview Lead records have two primary components – lead attributes and activity logs. Lead attributes are the fields and field values within the lead record. For example, Job Title is a lead attribute. Lead Name is a lead attribute. Activity logs record the actions Marketo or the lead themselves have taken. For example, sending an email to a lead is an activity that would show in the activity log. If the lead opens the email or visits a tracked page, those activities would show in the activity log as well.   Activities in the activity log are only retained for 25 months, or 37 if you have purchased the premium data retention option. The main way to store activity data beyond the Data Retention Policy timeframe is to use the Bulk Extract API. There are two other ways you can keep a reference of these activities after the end of the Data Retention period, and they can be referenced within the Marketo UI. This article will show you how that can be done.     Add Leads to Static Lists Static lists will retain lead membership even if the activity of adding the lead to the list has been removed. This will let you have lists dedicated to specific criteria that would otherwise be removed after the data retention time period has been passed.   For example, Smart Campaign membership history is not retained after 25 months. If you are searching for members of a Smart Campaign, but a lead first became a member of the Smart Campaign more than 25 months ago, the search results would not include that lead.   An easy way to work around that is to add your leads to a static list as part of the flow of the campaign. When creating your Smart Campaign, create a new static list with the same corresponding name (makes it easier to identify later). When building the flow of your campaign, add the "Add to List" flow step so that all leads going through the campaign will be logged on the list.         Use Custom Fields Lead attributes and their field values are not affected by the Data Retention Policy. Use Smart Campaigns to populate custom fields with values based on activities your leads take. This will allow you to filter leads by these lead attributes that are not affected by the Data Retention Policy. A side benefit to this is that it is faster to search by lead attributes than by searching through lead activity logs.   Example: This approach can work for many different activities, but let’s use form fill outs as an example.   Let’s say you want to be able to identify leads who have been very active and have filled out more than 5 forms over their lifecycle. You could use the filter “Filled Out Form” with the “Min. Number of Times” constraint set to 5. However, if one of those forms filled out occurred more than 25 months ago, the filter would only be able to access 4 form fill activities in the activity log. Therefore, the lead would not pass the filter.   Instead of using the “Filled Out Form” filter, set up a Smart Campaign to write to custom fields that show you how many forms they’ve filled out, and when the first one was. Here’s how to do it:   1. Create two new custom fields in Marketo, one Score Field, and the second a Date Field.   2. Create a new Smart Campaign   3. Add the trigger “Fills Out Form” set to “is any” to the Campaign Smart List     4. Add these two Flow Steps to the Campaign Flow: Flow Step 1 : “Change Score” Score Field Name: your score field name Change: +1   Flow Step 2 : “Change Data Value” Add Choice to Flow Step Choice 1: If “your score field name”  “is empty” Attribute “your score field name” New Value: {{system.date}} Default Choice: Do Nothing       This campaign will listen for any time a lead fills out a form, add +1 to your score field, and if it’s the very first form they’ve ever filled out, it will log the date of when it was done. If the lead has ever filled out a form in the past, there will already be a date value in the date field, so the flow choice would just skip over it and do nothing.       Results You’ll See: With the original goal of identifying leads who have filled out more than 5 forms you’ll be able to filter for leads that have filled out at least 5 forms. In addition, this campaign will let you search for leads based on when they had filled out their very first form, regardless of how long ago it was. Since it’s stored in a lead field, it’s a lead attribute that is not affected by the Data Retention Policy at all.      
View full article
!!EASTER EGG!! The ball with the Marketo logo in the upper-left corner of the screen is your Superball.  Here's a quick trick to make it bounce like it did when you first got into your Marketo instance: Hold down Ctrl (Command for Macs) + Shift, then hit the 's' key. Happy bouncing!    
View full article
At Marketo it is a violation of our Email Use Policy to send cold emails to purchased email addresses. Electronic Communications and Anti-Spam Policy Customer will comply with all laws and regulations applicable to bulk or commercial email, as well as other electronic communications, when using the Services, including without limitation all local or national laws applicable to the regions where Customer has business operations or where the recipients of their electronic communications are located. Marketo has a zero tolerance policy regarding using the Services to send Unsolicited Commercial Email ("UCE") or Unsolicited Bulk Email (“UBE”) (collectively referred to as “spam” or “Unsolicited Email”). Unsolicited Email is defined as email sent to persons other than  persons with whom Customer has an existing business relationship, OR (ii) persons who have consented to the receipt of such email, including publishing or providing their email address in a manner from which consent to receive email of the type transmitted may be reasonably implied. Commercial advertising and/or emails and other electronic communications may only be sent to recipients who have opted-in to receive messages from the sender. It is Marketo's policy to catalog, investigate and take appropriate action on all reports of abuse. Any Customer account found to be in violation of this policy is subject to immediate suspension, and may not be allowed to send any additional emails or other electronic communications using the Services. Recipients of emails or other electronic communications sent using the Services are encouraged to report suspected violation of this policy by forwarding a copy of the received email or other electronic communication to abuse@marketo.com. The full text of the policy is here: Marketo Use Policy – Marketo.com Is there ever an acceptable use for purchased data?  Yes. The Marketo Compliance Team supports the following uses for purchased data: Generate personalized URLs and send to purchased leads by postal mail Use purchased data to fill in additional details about leads who only provide an email address at the time of opt in - this makes for great targeting! When operating in a small market of known leads, purchased data can be useful for research purposes to track information about your target market Purchased leads can be contacted by phone to obtain email permission   The global anti-spam community does not consider permission to be transferable, except in the following circumstances: A company is wholly acquired by a new parent company; emails sent will include the same content from new owners A division of a company - product or brand - is acquired by a new parent company; emails sent will include the same content from new owners   Both parts of the above are key. Personal data alone may not be transferred with permission intact because permission is contextual. Even in the case of an acquisition additional permission is required if the emails will include significantly different content. To provide an illustration, when "Acme" acquired a home video camera company they acquired permission to continue to email the company's leads about selling home video cameras. That does not mean they have permission to email those people about every other product in "Acme's" portfolio. Email permission was granted to receive emails about home video products, not anything else. "Acme" could email those people and ask them to opt in to their other mailing lists, but acquiring a company does not give the new parent company the right to add the child company's opted-in leads to all their other unrelated mailing lists. Data vendors may say the leads they sell are "opted-in," but this is not true according to the standards set forth by the global antispam community.  Even if these individuals genuinely wished for the data vendor to sell their email addresses (often demonstrably untrue), they still would not have provided direct permission to the buyer to send them email. Marketo requires that permission be direct to the sender (or that there is an existing business relationship) to send email within our Terms. Many data companies offer list rental services where the data company sends an initial message, and passes on only the information of recipients who respond to the offer.   Marketo is not the only vendor in the marketplace with this philosophy against purchased lists, it is a widely know issue that purchased lists drive delivery issues. Purchased Lists and ESPs - Word to the Wise
View full article
A blacklist is a database that uses certain pieces of information to determine if an IP or domain is sending messages that could be considered spam. There are hundreds of blacklists out there, though only a handful of them are used widely enough to have a major impact on your email delivery rates. Blacklists are tools that are used by ISPs to inform decisions on whether or not to place a message in the end user’s inbox. If an IP or domain is on a blacklist, ISPs that use that blacklist to inform inbox decisions will not accept mail from that IP. Most blacklists are dynamic, meaning that they will delist automatically after a given period of time or when the sender’s email statistics improve. An IP will be included on a blacklist if certain criteria are met, and these criteria vary from blacklist to blacklist. Spamhaus, the world’s most well repudiated and widely used blacklist, has a great graphic that explains how their blacklist feeds information to ISPs and what happens from there. While blacklists use a number of methods to determine whether or not an IP is sending messages that could be considered spam, two of the most common are spamtraps addresses and user feedback. Spamtraps are email addresses that are not meant to receive email. Some spamtraps were created by anti-spam professionals and were never meant to receive email, while others are simply old invalid addresses that have been repurposed. You can read more about spam traps here: What Is a Spamtrap and Why Do They Matter?. Blacklists also rely heavily on feedback from users that tell them that a particular IP or sender is sending spam. We have to be strict about our Email Use and Anti-Spam Policy because in the rare event that one of our customers triggers a blacklist, any customer on the same IP range will be affected. To check if an IP is blacklisted, use this tool. If you have found that you are listed on a blacklist, please see this article, Blacklist Remediation, for a path to resolution. To learn more about specific blacklists, please visit our guide to the top blacklists, Top Blacklists – What You Need to Know.
View full article
In offering a premium email delivery platform to our customers we carefully monitor our IPs for listings on blacklists (Top Blacklists – What You Need to Know.) The Marketo Privacy team maintains relationships with the major blacklists to better assist our customers in resolving these issues. When we find that one of our customers was responsible for a blacklisting we contact that customer and request some actions be taken to remediate the issue. In many cases we find that sending an email to a spamtrap address (What Is a Spamtrap and Why Do They Matter?) caused the blacklisting.  Spamtraps are email addresses that have either never been used or have not been used for a long time and are now owned by anti-spam organizations. They are considered by these organizations as a sign of poorly maintained or inappropriately acquired addresses. Based on this assessment they conclude that the marketer is sending spam and consequently blacklist the sender.  To prevent future blacklistings you'll need to review your recent activity to remove the spamtrap from your mailing. Finding the spam trap address can be difficult; they are closely guarded secrets of the blacklisting organizations and they do not share these addresses. We describe several strategies below. The best approach for you depends on the make-up of your database and the amount of behavioral history in your Marketo system.The goal is to isolate potential spamtrap addresses and remove them. The group of addresses you select should be broad enough to capture those potentially bad addresses but small enough not to suppress a huge portion of your database. Blacklists are not all the same - some provide Marketo with more information, some with less. If at all possible we will provide you with a date and a subject line to help you isolate potential traps.          Step 1         To narrow the list of potential traps you should consider the following: Have you recently added any new leads or new lead sources? What is the source of these leads? Any purchased or appended email addresses should be removed because these data sources are often the source of newlyintroduced spamtraps. In addition lead sources like this can violate Marketo's Email Use and Anti-Spam Policy Have you recently added any older leads from another database that have not received email in the past year?  Some email providers will turn an address into a spamtrap after a year of inactivity.  If you have a list of addresses that had not received email for a year or more before recent email campaigns this list should be removed. Does your system use any custom fields to indicate customer status, event attendance, recent contact with your sales team, or other forms of engagement?  Take advantage of this and isolate the inactive or nonresponsive segments of your database using all activity data you have available. Is there anything different about this specific mailing that makes it different compared to your previous email campaigns? Did you send any other mail on the same day?  You could compare the recipient lists. Step 2   If you were able to identify newly introduced email addresses to your email program that are likely the source of the spamtrap suppress or remove those from your database so they will not receive email in future email campaigns.    If you have not identified a specific data source than you should target the inactive or nonresponsive segments of your database for potential spamtraps.  Because an individual does not manage spamtrap addresses, they are generally part or a larger spamtrap network; they will generally not show any form of activity. If you have behavioral history, the best approach to take is to identify the people who are not interacting with your company - not opening or clicking emails, not visiting the web page, not attending events, etc.   Build an inactive Smart List using ALL filters: Was sent email the day of and day before the spam trap hit (please contact support@marketo.com for the date of the trap hit if you do not have this information already.) Lead “was created” date is at least 6 months ago Inactivity Filters Not visited web page is “any”; constraint date of activity “in past 3 months” Not filled out form is “any”, constraint date of activity “in past 6 months” Not clicked link in email is “any”, constraint date of activity “in past 6 months” Not opened email is “any”, constraint date of activity “in past 6 months” If you have custom database fields that would show other forms of activity feel free to add this into your inactive Smart List to exclude active leads.   Step 3   Once you have created a smart list to identify these suspect leads you have several options. [Leads Tab > Lead Actions > Flow Actions] Remove leads from database Why waste your time on inactive leads?   Set leads to Marketing Suspended = true to suppress from future mailings Marketing suspended is functionally equivalent to unsubscribe. These leads will still be available for other flow actions, tracking, or operational emails. To avoid suppressing an active lead’s email address you can create a daily recurring batch campaign to take any marketing suspended lead who "wakes up" and engages and set them back to marketing suspended is false.    The daily batch campaign would be set to change Marketing Suspended back to false if the lead performed any specific activity in the last 24 hours like if they visit a web page, open or click a link in an email, fills out a form or has a lead status change. Here's how to set up the campaign:   Smart List (using the "ANY" filter, not "AND"): "Visits Web Page" "Clicks Link in Email" "Fills Out Form" "Opened Email"           All selectors for these filters should be set to 'any'.   Flow: "Change Data Value" flow step Attribute: "Marketing Suspended. New Value: "False".     Opt-In reconfirmation pass Create and release an email to inactive list with the following sample copy: "We have not heard from you in a while. Click this link to continue to receive messages." Anyone who does not click the link within 2 weeks should be set to Marketing Suspended. For recommendations on successful reconfirmation messages search our help articles on Successful Reconfirmation.   Some mix of the above Many of our customers take a tiered approach to blacklist remediation. If they can identify inactive, low-priority leads they may choose to immediately delete or Marketing Suspend these while reserving a reconfirmation pass for higher priority leads. If your list includes extremely high value sales targets you might consider having your sales team reach out individually. If considering this approach we recommend that you export the list and try various sorting techniques to get a feel for the leads you're looking at before deciding on the best way to segment them for different tiers of attention.     Step 4 – You’re Done! Don't forget to fill out the delisting form  
View full article
An email being filtered to a quarantine or bulk mail folder happens after the recipient mail server has accepted message.  Once an email has been accepted by a mail server, it is impossible to tell where it went or what happened to it.  Note that this is true of any mail sent by any system on the Internet.   Every mail server has configurable filters that determine how received mail will be handled.  The mail server administrator should be able to adjust those filters to ensure delivery of emails based on their business standards, or there may even be end-user-configurable controls that can accomplish the same thing.   If test mailings you are sending to yourself or your colleagues are being filtered to a quarantine or bulk mail folder, you should consider asking your email administrator to whitelist Marketo’s IP ranges.  They can be found here .   You can also improve your deliverability in general by setting up SPF and DKIM records , and branding your tracking links .
View full article
DMARC can be supported through DKIM alignment OR SPF alignment.   For DMARC verified by DKIM alignment Set up DKIM for the domain used in the From Address. OR For DMARC verified by SPF alignment This requires that the SMTP Mail From or bounce addresses used by Marketo's servers when sending the email be aligned with the From Address the recipient sees in the email envelope.  To put this alignment in place: Set up a branded SMTP Mail From (also known as bounce domain, envelope_from, Return Path).  To put this in place there are the following options: Send from a dedicated IP through Marketo, contact your salesperson or CSM to set this up. Send from a Trusted Marketo IP by applying here.  Branding is offered for free to customers sending from Marketo's Trusted IPs.  Once approved for this program reach out to Support to ask for the additional domain branding. Trusted IPs: A shared pool of IPs reserved for lower volume customers who can not qualify for a dedicated IP.  These customers must also meet best practice requirements as well. Purchase one-off domain branding if sending from a Shared Marketo IP, contact your salesperson or CSM to set this up.     Do you wonder what DMARC is? Review this What is DMARC?.
View full article
We have enhanced the behavior of the unsubscribe functionality to make it “durable”.  We have added a master email status, which is separate from the unsubscribe flag visible on the lead detail record.   If the unsubscribe flag is set from false to true, the master email status is updated, and the change is propagated to other leads with the same email address. Update the Unsubscribe flag from True to False (e.g. Re-subscribe a lead) When a lead is imported, the unsubscribe flag WILL NOT be overwritten by the import. Here are the ways a lead can be re-subscribed: 1.   In SFDC, uncheck the Email Opt Out field.  This WILL sync to Marketo. 2.   Manually update the lead detail record by un-checking the unsubscribe flag 3.   Run a Change Data Value Flow Action on one or many leads a.  Select the attribute “unsubscribe” and set the value to False 4.   Update an existing lead via SOAP API 5.   Form Field – set a field on a form to set the unsubscribe flag to “false” and this will unsubscribe the lead a. Best practice would be to have text on the form that says that by filling out this form, they are agreeing to receive email communication Creating a New Lead When a new lead is created, we check it against the master email status table.  If the lead was previously unsubscribed, we will update the record to be unsubscribed.   Changing an email address If you change the email address of a lead to an unsubscribed email address, the lead will be unsubscribed.  This change can occur in either Marketo or SFDC. If you change an unsubscribed email address to one that is subscribed, the lead will be subscribed.    
View full article
What is a Blacklist? Can I Still Send My Emails, or Are You Blocking Me from Sending? What Is a Spamtrap and Why Do They Matter? Can You Give Me the Spam Trap Address That Triggered the Blacklist So I Can Remove It from My Database? Can You Give Me More Information regarding the Blacklist Issue? What Is the Quarantined IP Range? I Sent This Email Campaign a While Ago. Why Am I Only Getting Notification of the Blacklist Issue Now, and Am I Still Blacklisted? The Blacklist Notification Went to the Wrong Email Address. Why Was It Sent to That Address? Which blacklists should I be concerned about? - Top Blacklists – What You Need to Know How do blacklist issues get resolved? What steps do I need to take to resolve the blacklist issue? - Blacklist Remediation    
View full article
From the Marketo Email Use Policy: "...You may not send any Unsolicited Email by use or means of the Marketo Service. "Unsolicited Email" is defined as email sent to persons other than: persons with whom you have an existing business relationship, OR (ii) persons who have consented to the receipt of such email, including publishing or providing their email address in a manner from which consent to receive email of the type transmitted may be reasonably implied." The full text of the policy is here: https://documents.marketo.com/legal/use-policy/ An abuse report is a report that an individual sends to abuse@marketo.com alleging that a Marketo customer sent unsolicited email. There are a number of reasons why someone might report abuse. Here are a few common reasons people report abuse to us: The person forgot they opted-in to the mailing The person received genuinely unsolicited email The person opted in, but the branding in the email was different than the branding on the opt in form so it was not clear the email they received was connected to their opt-in experience Someone signed up for your list with the wrong address, and the person who actually received your email felt it was abusive   For additional reference - Abuse Report Deep Dive  
View full article
Marketo calls direct complaints received from email recipient Abuse Reports.  For more information about Abuse Reports review the links below: Why do people report abuse? What Is the Difference between an Abuse Report and a Feedback Loop Complaint? Abuse Reports: What They Are and How to Avoid Them   For additional articles reviewing compliance concerns refer to the articles below: What is a Blacklist? Feedback Loops (FBL) Finding Leads that are Auto Unsubscribed for Email Spam Complaints / Feedback Loop (FBL)
View full article
Leads can be auto unsubscribed due to default Feedback Loop setup with the ISPs listed on this page. You can use the following filters to find leads that have clicked the SPAM button in your emails:     Filter 1: Data Value Changed Attribute: Unsubscribe New Value: True Reason: Contains, Customer Complaint Received from ISP.   (Optional to Specify what Email Domain) Filter 2: Email Address Email Address: Contains, @domain.    
View full article
When making an unsubscribe page, there are a few things you should keep in mind: It is illegal to require a login for someone to be able to unsubscribe. You must offer an "unsubscribe from all" option.   Let them unsubscribe! While it's always sad to lose a subscriber, it is far better for someone to unsubscribe than for them to click the spam button or report your message as abusive. Your unsubscribe page should be as clear and easy to navigate as possible. If you offer a preference center, you must still include an unsubscribe from all option.      
View full article
The Marketo Privacy Team often recommends that our customers send a reconfirmation message to a set of their inactive leads. This process is used as both a proactive strategy to ensure good delivery rates and as a response to blacklisting issues.  For more information on this overall strategy search our Resource Articles for Blacklist Remediation. At its most basic a reconfirmation message request a lead takes an action to stay on your mailing list.  If they don't take that action they will be automatically removed from the mailing list. These types of messages don't usually get a high response rate because you are sending the reconfirmation message to people who have already shown to be disengaged from your marketing. However there are instances where some reconfirmation messages get a more enthusiastic response than others so we've put together some tips for making the most out of reconfirmation. Instead of marketing your company itself think of it as though you are marketing ENGAGEMENT with your company. While these ideas are similar, they aren’t quite the same. You want to frame this message with a sense of urgency to click a link. You also want to make it as easy as possible for someone to open the message and just click a link so they continue to stay engaged with your marketing.   Subject Line We recommend that you frame the subject line very clearly with something about “not missing out” or “staying informed”. The subject should create a compelling and specific call to action.  Some senders use an offer in the reconfirmation message to encourage action. Highlight this in the subject line if this is your approach. Examples We’ve Missed You!  Take Action continue receiving our offers! Last Opportunity to Stay Informed (Action Required) Free shipping plus save 15% on next purchase   From Address While you can use any From Address, we recommend that your From: label clearly identifies your company rather than using a lead owner name. A disengaged recipient is more likely to recognize “Your Company” than “Bob Smith”.   Email Content In the body of the message your call to action should be immediate and clear. Put the reconfirmation at the top of the message content. Some usability studies have suggested that two choices may be more successful than a single choice so consider a bolder reconfirmation link at the top and a smaller link or button lower to unsubscribe. The main priority is getting someone to stick around for more of your mailings. You may also wish to make a short value statement about the fantastic information that someone can expect to receive by staying on your list! There are a couple of reasons for these recommendations. The first has to do with making things easy for the blacklist operator.  If during the resolution process they can look at the mail received by their spamtraps and immediately tell from the subject line that the message is a reconfirmation pass it will make it much easier for them to consider the data quality issue resolved because their spamtraps will not activate the reconfirmation link. Some of the less automated blacklists will not list a sender for a reconfirmation message that hits their traps so it's important that your cleanup action look like what it is. The second reason behind this advice is that many people just scan their messages and don’t read all the way to the bottom; if someone has to read through a long value proposition before realizing that they must click a link to continue to be subscribed to your email program you may lose more subscribers than intended. The faster and easier it is to click that link the more people you’ll retain! A lot of people scan over marketing offers and think about them for a while before taking an action.  You want to interrupt that process and make it clear that action is required now whether or not they’re ready to make a purchase!   Examples of simple reconfirmation email templates More examples can be found in this other Community Resource “A Creative Re-Engagement Email Campaign” Email #1 Subject Line: Action Required to stay subscribed to COMPANY   [First Name]:   You previously expressed interest in receiving valuable information and/or offers from COMPANY that are specific to your field.  We’d like your permission to continue sending you relevant information via email so that you can stay up-to-date on the latest industry trends/topics of interest.   Please click “YES” below to continue receiving research and trends in your area of interest.  COMPANY subscribers receive exclusive benefits, including the latest research briefs, white papers and/or compelling offers or discounts for future purchases.   Please update your Ccommunication Preference by [DATE/TIME] or this could be your last chance to receive any future research.  It only takes a moment to click one of the choices below.   YES, I would like to stay subscribed to the valuable information from COMPANY.   NO, I no longer wish to receive valuable and insightful offers from COMPANY.   Sincerely, COMPANY   ————–   Email #2   Subject Line: Your Subscription to COMPANY Industry Newsletter Expires Soon   [First Name]:   Our records show that you expressed interest in receiving industry information from COMPANY on [INSERT DATE].  Records indicate you have not read an email in [variable time frame], we do not want to bother you with emails you do no wish to receive so we want to confirm that you would like to remain subscribed to the COMPANY email program.   If you wish to be removed, you don’t have to do anything further.  However, if you do want to continue receiving email from COMPANY, please click the link to let us know:   YES, I would like to stay informed and continue receiving email from COMPANY.   Sincerely, COMPANY   ————–   Email #3   Subject Line: Your Subscription to COMPANY Has Expired   [First Name]:   Thank you for your previous interest in receiving valuable content from COMPANY.  Your subscription has now expired and you will no longer receive any future emails.   If in the future you would like to continue to receive email from COMPANY please click the link to sign up:   YES, I would like to receive email from COMPANY.   Sincerely, COMPANY     Other Resources Marketo Community Resource “A Creative Re-Engagement Email Campaign” http://www.spamhaus.org/whitepapers/permissionpass/ http://blog.deliverability.com/2013/07/do-you-know-whats-lurking-in-your-database-know-thy-data.html http://blog.marketo.com/2010/05/key-to-email-deliverability-is-reputation.html http://www.marketo.com/email-deliverability/  
View full article