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All Places > Los Angeles User Group > Blog > Author: Darrell Alfonso

Hey Los Angeles Friends,

 

I recently published this video on how to use the Marketo commmunity: Tips & Tricks to Get More From the Marketo Community Online 

 

Hope you find it helpful.

 

Hear are some the the key take-aways:

 

  1. Use the main search at the top right hand corner versus any other search
  2. Bookmark Product docs, Marketo University and Job Opportunities
  3. Make sure to FOLLOW your favorite places, like Job Opportunities and your User Group
  4. When using search, take into account these three things
    1. Better to use keyword search than long tail search
    2. Reference the "helpful" tags
    3. Keep in mind that posts published several years ago may not be relevant today
  5. When asking questions, include screenshots and be as descriptive as possible
  6. When browsing blog posts, use the "filter by author" feature to have a much more manageable view
  7. When playing the Marketo community game to earn points, go for the big badges that are worth a lot of points, and always take advantage of the badges that can be earned multiple times.

 

Enjoy!

Here’s a quick look at my findings from optimizing our lead scoring model over the past few months. Comment below to add your own thoughts and feedback.

 

4 Actionable Tips:

 

1. Translating the scoring model for sales

I came across this while trying to get feedback from sales as to how to improve the scoring system. The +10 and -5 didn’t really resonate with the group, so for every action I added a temperature label to communicate how “hot” or “cold” a lead was based on the action.

This way it is easy to speak the same language and gain consensus as to what actions deserve each score.

 

 

2. Clump Analysis

There is probably a more scientific/statistical term for this – but the idea here to export all of your leads into excel with a few columns displayed. These columns would have to be your scoring fields, and then include other interesting fields like lead status. If your database is very large, you may want to export a segment (for example, leads in the last 6 months).

 

Using the Countif function in excel you can easily come up with a frequency distribution. Or you can use a method like this: http://www.excel-easy.com/examples/frequency-distribution.html

 

Invariably you will find large clumps of leads sitting at certain scores, which can provide insight into your entire model. However, a quick win will be to evaluate this against your MQL threshold score. For example, if sales have the bandwidth to review more leads - or if they lack time to review the current leads assigned to them, you know how many notches to kick the score up or down.

 

3. Scoring Footprint at the campaign level

If you have not conducted a scoring footprint audit, it is very helpful and instructions are here: https://nation.marketo.com/blogs/marketowhisperer/2015/12/09/4-simple-ways-to-evaluate-if-your-scoring-model-works . This is the next level down, to see which scoring campaigns have influenced your leads in a given time period.

 

For each scoring smart campaign, check the members by week tab in the summary view.  First, check each one to make sure that members are running through the program.  If there are no members in the program, either the campaign was setup incorrectly, or there is a process problem downstream.

 

 

 

4. Evaluate 10 most recent closed/won deals, 10 most recent disqualified/junk leads

The recommended method to develop and evaluate scoring is to analyze commonalities among a large number of closed deals and disqualified leads. However, analyzing the most recent won deals and disqualified leads offers an excellent barometer to how accurate your scoring model is. You can use the opportunity analyzer, but for me creating an excel sheet of the company size, industry, title, and then the key activities that were performed before close is even more insightful. To start attributing negative scores to bad leads, find patterns among the most recent disqualified leads.  Company too small? Student or intern title? Bad industry fit? Start assigning negative points for each of these and try to add more on a regular basis.

 

Hope some of these tactics help – would love to hear your favorite lead scoring optimization tips!

I’ve spent a lot of time tinkering here and there in the Marketo community, and it has greatly benefited me – both in terms of rapid learning and making new connections.

 

Here are some of my own personal tips to help you get even more out of the Marketo community.

 

1. Post a Question – Make it a daily routine

 

From a learning perspective, posting everyday has helped me tremendously.  First, it gets me in the habit of visiting the community and interacting with others. Second, it encourages me to uncover any gaps in knowledge that I have that could be useful as it applies to my work and my company. An easy way to get started is to ask the question “What Marketo-related obstacles am I facing now that others could help me with?” Don’t worry about asking beginner-type questions: the marketo community is for novices, gurus, and everyone in between. Community members are more than willing to share their knowledge and expertise!

 

So, put it on your daily to-do list to think about your current projects and initiatives, ask others for their opinions, or how they implemented similar projects in their businesses.  As icing on the cake, posting a question/discussion and categorizing it with tags earns you 35 points (10 points for the post, 25 for the Tag Your It badge).

 

2. Try to answer a question or make a comment everyday

 

At first, answering questions and offering your comments may seem daunting, especially if you compare yourself to Marketo super experts who have been in the biz for years. Just remember that every instance of Marketo is unique, and while there may be only one correct answer to specific product questions, everyone can have a valuable and fresh perspective when it comes to strategy and best practices. 

Also worth mentioning is that members love it when you put a different spin or perspective to problems. Common cases I see include “How do I do X?” After the question is correctly answered, another member will put forward “Well you could actually accomplish the same thing by doing Y, and it may be less of a hassle than X.” This just goes to show that another set of eyes can really make a difference.

 

3. Peruse the blog posts in both the Marketing and Product Places

 

The blog posts here tend to be very operational and hands-on in nature compared to Marketo’s other content blogs and thought leadership sections on the main site.  If you go back through the blog archives you are likely to find a step-by-step guide to solving a problem you are currently working on.

Here are a few gems I found quickly by going through the back log:

 

https://nation.marketo.com/community/marketing/blog/2016/01/29/create-a-high-impact-nurture-program-every-time-part-ii

https://nation.marketo.com/community/product_and_support/blog/2017/01/01/difference-in-marketo-email-reporting-metrics

https://nation.marketo.com/community/marketing/blog/2015/11/22/marketo-best-practices-can-someone-just-tell-me-what-i-don-t-know

 

4. Revisit the Skill Builder Videos

 

Located here: https://nation.marketo.com/community/product_and_support/marketo-skillbuilder

Recently, Marketo has really adopted a new “sharing is caring” mentality around their fantastic recorded training videos. Historically, besides the very basics, most of this content was only available with a Marketo Learning Passport through Marketo University which was available at an extra cost.  Some very new and relevant content such as how to migrate emails, create lead scoring with tokens, and manage Pay-Per-Click advertising campaigns with Marketo are now available in Skill Builder.

 

5. Mark Answers as “Correct” and “Helpful”

 

If you have ever gone searching for the answer to an obscure problem you are having, you’ll notice that there are tons of discussions and even more comments and answers.  The visual cues that distinguish the salient comments from the sea of questions and clarifying remarks are the Correct and Helpful buttons. You can quickly pick out questions that have been answered correctly by looking for the “green checkmark” above questions in the search results – the questions with “helpful” comments are also easily picked out in the search results and can help get to the answer to your question faster. So, give back, pay-it-forward, help others and yourself by marketing answers as Correct and/or Helpful if appropriate.

 

6. Scope out all the “Places” Marketo community has to offer

 

There have been some changes recently to the navigational layout of the Marketo community, so some “Places” that were usually very visible are now a lot harder to find. You can still view most of the existing places by clicked on “All Places” at the top left above the header (which is like a site tree sort of thing) and also by clicking on Subspaces. Here you can explore additional topics such as Women in Business, User Groups, Virtual User Groups, Marketo Summit talks, Certification Study Groups and more.

 

7. Post in Your User Group

 

Posting and checking for updates in your local Marketo User Group (MUG) is a great idea because it familiarizes you with other Marketo users in your community and you can engage in much more intimate discussions and breakout sessions since you will see the same community members over and over.  In addition to staying abreast of on-site meetups in your city, this is where you can see updates on road shows, events, job opportunities, all kinds of good stuff. Your posts will encourage other members to keep the conversation going, so add it to part of you weekly community routine!

 

That’s it for me, what about others' opinions? What other tips have you found helpful in interacting with the community?