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By now, you've probably heard the exciting news: Marketing Nation Summit is taking place at Adobe Summit, March 24-28, 2019 in Las Vegas!

 

Why? Because, now that you’re part of the Adobe family, Adobe and Marketo couldn’t wait to engage with you and connect you with an even larger community of passionate marketers. Integrating Marketing Nation Summit into Adobe’s event allows you to not only enjoy all of the usual Marketing Nation activities, but gives you the opportunity to connect with the broader Adobe ecosystem and benefit from multiple days of additional breakout content covering every area of interest to modern marketers in 2019.

Together with 15,000+ marketers, advertisers, data scientists, and other experience marketers, join us for four inspiring and action-packed days. Learn more about how Marketo integrates with Adobe Sensei, Adobe Experience Cloud, Adobe Analytics, and much more. Marketo will be integrated throughout the entire event, including the community pavilion (exhibit hall), general sessions, and networking events—plus, we have added a dedicated day on Thursday, March 28, specifically focused on bringing together the entire Marketing Nation for compelling content breakouts sessions, and most importantly, opportunities to celebrate our achievements together.

 

Tickets are on sale now and all Marketo customers will be offered a discounted ticket price of $1,195 (originally $1,895). To purchase tickets, register here and enter promo code S19MN.
 

Stay tuned for more information in the coming weeks, including:

  • A full list of Marketo sessions
  • Marketo’s University Day and opportunities to get your Marketo certification
  • Plus, regional events for the Marketing Nation community happening around the globe throughout 2019, such as Adobe Summit EMEA in London (May 13-16, 2019)


Questions? Please don’t hesitate to reach out to summitsupport@adobe-summit.com.


Best,
 

The Marketo Team

“Imagine you win the lottery today and quit your job tomorrow. Would someone be able to step right in and take over your Marketo instance?” This is the mindset Tori Forte, Marketo consultant extraordinaire, recommends as you’re thinking about documenting your Marketo instance. In fact, good documentation can be nearly as important as the actual implementation itself. Keeping track of changes and decisions you’ve made during your instance setup can help you:

  • More easily train additional users in a scalable way
  • Build more efficiently in Marketo long-term
  • Maintain the health and hygiene of your instance moving forward
  • Make the transition process much smoother for a new Marketo admin if your team experiences any turnover


There are a couple different types of documentation you can produce. A governance guide outlines your instance setup in detail with topics such as program/folder structures, communication limits, and more. This would be a living document that users would turn to in order to identify your specific best practices and governing standards for your Marketo instance, and would mainly be for your Marketo admin or main user. In addition to a governance guide, your team may need supplemental enablement documents or training materials to help them get up to speed with Marketo. These could include exercises to practice working with the platform, quizzes to pass before being granted access, or a list of what your users are allowed to do in Marketo. These would be aimed at all Marketo users in your organization.
Whether you’re putting together a full blown governance guide or are simply documenting the key aspects of your setup to start, writing down the decisions you make during onboarding will help you and your team be successful with Marketo.

Getting Started on Your Documentation

Having trouble getting started on your guide? Tori suggests first focusing on the most important aspect of your Marketo documentation: your Admin Setup. “Make sure you’re writing down all of your behind-the-scenes decisions so if anyone needs to take over your Marketo instance, they’ll be able to understand how and why your instance was set up the way it is.” It’s crucial, Tori points out, that you “don’t just document what was built, but why it was built that way.” This helps a future admin (or even future you) avoid repeating decisions that didn’t work out or wasting time going down dead ends.

 

Another recommendation from Tori to establish the success of your documentation is to “ensure every rule you make has an owner to enforce it down the line. Lack of enforcement makes writing those rules moot.” Check in with your team and put a process in place to make sure this documentation will continue to adapt and stay relevant, as well as stay top of mind for your users.

Tips and Tricks

Whether you’re documenting a new/existing instance or creating training resources for your organization’s Marketo users, consider these tips from one of our resident Marketo experts, Kylie Peters:

  • Over-document, over-communicate, over-test! If it feels like you’re doing enough, you might not be doing enough.” You never know what might be useful to you or your team in the future, so be sure to add in details and keep other teams in the loop!
  • Be ‘new-hire-minded’. Write the documentation for someone who’s never used this technology before.” Once you become familiar with Marketo it can be easy to take a lot of background knowledge for granted. Make sure you’re creating your enablement and governance documentation with the most basic user in mind. Consider including some definitions and best practices directly into your training documentation if they’ll help new users get up to speed.
  • People have different ways of processing and understanding information so it helps to use a combination of written points, pictures, videos, and hands-on exercises in your trainings.” Instead of just writing a block of text to send out to your team, include some interactive content or a couple different formats within your enablement documentation and training.
  • Run the documentation by someone who’s never seen Marketo before and ask them if they have any questions.” Not sure if your governance and enablement documentation is clear? Ask someone who’s never used Marketo to take a look and see if they can follow your trainings. This will give you a good fresh perspective on what you’ve put together and how you can improve it.
  • “It’s important to remember that training documents are very different based on your needs and your instance.” Unlike governance guides, which should be as comprehensive as possible, enablement documents should be produced based on your organization’s need. Keep in mind that what might be important to document in detail for one instance or one user could be less relevant for others. You should know your instance and users best, so create your training documentation accordingly.



Marketo Documentation Sample Topics

Use these topics to guide your initial Marketo governance documentation plan. It may help to take it slow and start with a few topics that are important to your particular instance, then expand from there.

 

  • What is Marketo and what are its purposes for our organization
  • Purpose of this Documentation
  • Process to Maintain/Make Changes to Governance Guide
  • Administrative Set Up
    • Instance(s)
    • Workspaces and Partitions
    • User Roles and Responsibilities
    • Smart Campaign/Email/Program Settings
    • Communication Limits
    • Security
    • Channels
    • Tags
  • Data Structure
    • Field Structure
  • Operational Programs
  • Building In Marketo Instance
    • Center of Excellence (COE)
    • Folder Structure
    • Naming Conventions
    • Program Organization
    • Templates
    • Standardized Processes
    • Checklists
    • Segmentations
    • Archiving
    • Subscription Center
  • CRM Integration
    • How does the sync work
    • Campaign Sync
    • Data Dictionary
  • Other Integrations
  • GDPR & Compliance

 

Check out an example of Channel Documentation here.

 

Start documenting your instance today! Be sure to involve your whole team - whether that’s just you or a team of 10 - and revisit these docs every month to keep it up to date as your use of your Marketo instance grows.

Or not so much “beware” as ignore an Email Bounced Soft that doesn't have an associated Category.

 

Far too many posts and practices imply that grouping Email Bounced Soft-s together with a simple filter is harmless. The thought is that you may want to separate Category 3, Category 4, and Category 9 but you don't have to.

 

The approach is implicitly encouraged by the official docs:

 

 

But this doc is misleading, because there's one type unlisted: call it the No-Category (NC) Soft Bounce.

 

Guess what falls into NC? If you read my posts avidly, you might suspect it's something code-related. Yep: a Velocity token parsing error results in an NC Soft Bounce.

 

Here's one I triggered at a client just now by accidentally deleting the close parenthesis ) from a #set directive:

 

 

I quickly fixed the error before sending again in this case.

 

But imagine if it took more troubleshooting, and each send triggered an operational campaign (or qualified for the equivalent daily batch) that counted Email Bounced Soft activities without a Category constraint, setting Marketing Suspended = true when people exceeded a threshold. There are well-known recipes for Marketo database cleaning out there that do just that!

 

Don't make that mistake. Constrain Email Bounced Soft by Category [is not empty] to catch only the bounce types which may call the lead's info into question. Velocity coding errors must not be held against the lead, as they're completely in your court.

 

You can view just the Velocity parsing errors like this:

 

 

 

P.S. and N.B.: the Velocity errors that are surfaced as NC Soft Bounces are Velocity Template Language (VTL) parsing errors. That is, forgetting the #end of an #if, missing parentheses or brackets, or other broken syntax. That doesn't include Java language errors thrown by syntactically valid VTL, like trying to get() a nonexistent index in an ArrayList of Custom Objects. The latter type of error shows up verbosely in the Preview UI, but if it makes it to send time, it's swallowed by the system. You will only see the Sent Email without a corresponding Delivered Email in this case. Obviously that's pretty ambiguous. So test, test, test your Velocity!

Smart list? Engagement programs? Clones? As a new Marketo user it can feel like working in Marketo is not just about learning how to use a platform, but learning how to speak a different language. If you're trying to understand all the terms and concepts you're running into, check out this Glossary of Marketo Terms! Let us know what your favorite Marketo phrase is by posting in the comments below.

 

If you see something that's missing or needs updating, let us know at cx@marketo.com. Happy learning!

**Posting on behalf of Rajesh Talele**

 

What is segmentation

Marketo’s segmentation allows you to automatically group people into distinct profiles for reporting and dynamic content.

 

There is a lot more to personalization than just "Hi {{Lead.First Name}}". With Marketo dynamic content, you can customize how different people see a landing page or email. Segmentation is the basis on which you can customize this dynamic content.

 

Segmentation categorizes your audience into different subgroups based on a Smart List rule. These groups are called segments.

 

For example, if we have a segmentation called Industry, some of the segments could be: Healthcare, Technology, Financial, Consumer Goods etc.

 

Once you've created different segments, you can add dynamic content blocks into your landing page or email. This tells Marketo that you want that piece of content to be different depending on which person views it.

 

Keeping your Marketo segmentation updated so that it accurately classifies leads in usable segments is an important part of administering this powerful system. If your Marketo segmentations are incorrectly classifying people, then your job as a marketing manager becomes a whole lot harder as you explain why campaigns went to the wrong people or why the wrong message is being communicated to wrong people.

 

Points to remember about Marketo segmentation:

  • Within a segmentation, the segments are mutually exclusive. A person can be a member of only one segment at a time.
  • When a person qualifies for two segments, they will belong only to the first one in the list.
  • If a person does not qualify for any segment, they will become a member of the Default Segment.
  • Segmentations are not ‘instantaneous’ like Marketo smart lists. Segmentations are more like ‘dynamic static lists’ that get updated nightly.
  • Segmentation rules get triggered only when there is a change in field value involved. Change in segmentation does not get triggered if there is no ‘data value change’ on the lead field involved. For example, a lead would not change segments just because a ‘calculated’ formula field value changes.

 

Why do we have to check and maintain segmentation periodically?

Marketo is a fluid system where lead’s information keeps on changing. These changes come in from various sources, webform submissions, list imports, sync from CRM, data enrichment and so on. Many of these data points are ‘free text’ fields thus the data entered is generally not normalized. Due to the influx of non-normalized data, many times, segmentations need tweaking, if the segmentations use such free-text fields.

 

So how do you keep your Marketo segmentations clean and usable?

Here are some of the symptoms that we should check periodically and take corrective action to make sure that the segmentation is accurately segmenting based on the business needs.

 

Symptom 1:

For a given segmentation, most of the leads are falling in 'Default' segment.

This is an indicator that the segmentation is ineffective in classifying majority of leads and the criteria needs an overhaul. For example, the following segmentation has most of the leads qualify for ‘Default’ segment. That means the criteria defined for the named segments are not capturing most of the combinations of leads that they should. Or we do not have the required data on most of the leads.

 

Segmentation_01.jpg

 

Action:

Investigate if we need to tweak the segmentation criteria

Or

Enrich/augment the missing lead field data.

 

Symptom 2:

Leads are being placed in incorrect segments.

For example, let’s say you have a segment for ‘Directors of Marketing’ with criteria like:

 

Segmentation_02.jpg

You might find many ‘Director’ level marketing positions are still not being captured in this segment. For example, ‘Director of Mktg.’, ‘Media Director’, ‘Director of Operations’, ‘Director of Digital Strategy’ and so on.

 

One way to check is to check for all possible values in a field by creating a ‘People performance’ report. And group it by the field you are looking to analyze. For example:

For ‘Job function’ segmentation based on ‘Job Title’, ‘People by Job Title’ report will help to find out what unique values we must consider for segmentation logic and priority. Here you see a possible 5000 different values that need to be considered.

 

Segmentation_03.jpg

 

Action:

Analyze lead field values from the report to make sure that your segmentation covers entire set of available data, in this example the ‘job titles’. And tweak the segments criteria accordingly.

Check each segment criteria for correctness and completeness. The segment criteria must be open enough to capture all leads that should fall in that segment, so make sure your criteria is not too rigid.

 

Symptom 3:

Even after analysis and fine tuning of each segment criteria to capture each combination correctly as we saw above, leads might get placed in incorrect segments due to ‘wrong segmentation priority order’.

For example, let’s say that your ‘Manager and associate level marketing’ segment checks for word ‘Marketing’ in the job title. While ‘Director level marketing’ segment checks for both ‘Director’ and ‘Marketing’ in the job title.

 

Segmentation_04.jpg

 

Job titles like ‘Director of Marketing Communication', or ‘Marketing Director’ might end up being in Job function 'Manager and associate level marketing' instead of Director level marketing' in above segmentation definition.

 

You will have to modify the segmentation priority order appropriately to place a lead in the right segment based on your business targeting priorities, as pictured below:

 

Segmentation_05.png

 

That way, ‘Director of Marketing Communication’ will fall in the ‘Director level marketing’ segment while ‘Marketing specialist’ etc. will still fall in the ‘Manager and associate level marketing’ segment.

 

Action:

Analyze different criteria and priority based on business logic needed and optimize the segmentation priority order.

 

Symptom 4:

You have an approved segmentation that is not used anywhere at all.

 

 

Segmentation_06.jpg

Action:

Consider removing that segmentation.

 

Symptom 5:

You have an approved segmentation that is used in Marketo flow steps but have ‘segments’ in it that do not have any ‘members’.

For example, if your ‘Job Function’ segmentation has a segment that is for ‘Lawyers’ and you do not have a single lead matching that segment, maybe that segment is redundant, like the ‘Unused segment’ in the following screenshot.

 

This also might be related to symptom 2.

 

Segmentation_07.jpg

 

Action:

Consider deleting that segment.

 

Symptom 6:

Segmentation is using field(s) that are sparingly populated.

 

Segmentation_08.jpg

 

If a considerable portion of leads do not have the field populated, though the segmentation might be coded correctly, it will still be ineffective.

 

Action:

We need to take steps to augment or enrich the leads database with job title data for leads with ‘Empty’ value.

 

Other issues to check:

Segmentations getting ‘timed out’

Both scenarios as shown below can result in segmentation processing getting ‘timed out’.

  • Too many segments in a segmentation
  • Overly complex segment criteria with lot of ‘contains’ operator and lot of constraints.

Segmentation_09.png

 

Leads not moving to another segment, though ‘segment smart list’ shows different.

This can happen in following scenarios,

1. Segmentation based on ‘in past’ or ‘in time frame’ constraints.

Segmentation_10.jpg

Segmentations get triggered only on ‘actual data value change’ and since there is no actual field value change happening when a ‘Close Date’ falls in ‘Last Quarter’ from ‘This Quarter’ because today is the first day of a new quarter, the segmentation change would not get triggered. Potentially, leads may not move in different segments as perceived they should as days pass by.

 

2. Segmentation based on ‘Formula fields auto-calculated in SFDC’

Let’s say the ‘Received Connection ID’ is a formula field calculated automatically in SFDC, changes in the value of this field will not trigger segmentation change in Marketo. For segmentation change to trigger, the data value needs to be changed in Marketo. Leads might not move in to different segments corresponding to the value they have on the ‘formula’ fields.Segmentation_11.png

 

Conclusion:

Perform regular health checks of your Marketo segmentations to ensure that anything you use segmentation for is up to date and ready to use. And, after you do any large-scale cleanup, import of new leads etc.

This week, we prepared another excerpt from our brand new Marketo Champion-authored ebook, titled [Marketo Success] Guide. The [Marketo Success] Guide will give marketers detailed insights to navigate Marketo like our most successful customers and help you prove your Marketing team’s impact to your organization. Check out an excerpt from the ebook below written by Alex Greger, Marketing Automation Manager at Hitachi Vantara & Lauren Aquilino, Senior Consultant at Revenue Pulse to learn how they A/B test their landing pages in Marketo.

 

A/B Testing

What is it

Only 52% of those that use landing pages also test them to improve conversions. (1) Testing allows you to optimize conversion rates. This is a native, and frankly underused, feature. In Marketo, A/B test groups allow you to compare conversion rates of specific landing pages and optimize for the best results.

 

Why use it

The real question is - why not use it? A/B testing allows you to quickly gain insight into what’s working and what’s not. You’ll be able to gain valuable insights on the UX preferences of your audience.

 

How to use it

Landing pages are tested using a feature in Marketo called Landing Page Test Groups. First, you’ll create the landing pages you would like to test against each other - two or more. Ideally they would have forms. While still unapproved, right click one and select convert to test group.

 

ABTesting_01.jpg

 

Add the landing pages that you would like to test, and approve your test group. Once your landing pages are approved and live, you’ll be able to compare stats of the landing pages in your test group.

 

ABTesting_02.jpg

 

When testing, every component is up for adjusting. However, there are some factors that may affect conversion more than others. Some examples include:

  • Form placement and length
  • Social proof
  • Headline
  • Copy
  • Images
  • CTA
  • Button Color

 

4 Keys to testing include:

  1. Define goals and baseline metrics
  2. Keep it simple and choose one variable at a time
  3. Test often
  4. Maintain a log of results

 

We hope you enjoyed reading this excerpt from the upcoming [Marketo Success] Guide: Best Practices from Marketo Champions. Keep an eye out for more tidbits from the new ebook that is launching in early 2019. Have questions about the content? Let us know in the comments!

 

Resources:

(1) http://www.wordstream.com/blog/ws/2017/08/02/conversion-rate-statistics

With 2019 right around the corner, we wanted to address an ever-important and always-changing landscape, the MarTech stack. That's why we partnered with Marketo Champion Alumni and Founder of Marketing Rockstar Guides Josh Hill to bring you an in-depth discussion on what your business needs to consider when evaluating your MarTech stack.

 

How do you assess whether or not your MarTech stack is working for you right now?

I would say two or three times a year, I will ask this question of the team and my stack. Depending on the answers and pain level, we can prioritize work to improve the day as well as acquire more customers. I ask a few questions:

  • Can it handle your current volume?
  • Is it creating work or taking away work?
  • Is it collecting the data you need now and in the future?
  • What’s the pain level (or How much would I gain/save by making a change?).


For example, I’ve encountered the question, “Pardot or Marketo?” from many people directly and in the Marketo Nation. When I ask them more about their question, it turns out that they were using Pardot for a year or two, and then reached a certain volume of campaigns as well as database size (usually 30k+) and felt Pardot wasn’t quite meeting their needs anymore.


Similarly, I’ve had a situation where we were running Events out of Marketo. The Events team wanted to provide a certain on page experience and workflow to their audience. When we discussed it more deeply, it turned out Marketo could support that if we spent a bit of time building a better page and Marketo Program Template.
Later on, as requirements and volume changed, we explored an Event Platform as a MarTech stack change to enhance our abilities and experiences for the audience. Naturally, we ensured the new platform worked closely with Marketo and our data processes.

If you consider Marketo one of the core pieces of your tech stack, how do you prioritize adding additional technology?

Again, it’s about asking the right questions. There are a lot of good marketers and sales people like you and me working to convince colleagues at other firms that our tools will solve problems. The challenge is that you may not really need those tools – today or ever. Unless you go through a proper RFP process which include Requirements Gathering, it will be hard to evaluate a purchase (or a no decision).
Over the years, I prioritize projects based on cost-benefit, which in MarTech means “Will this automate away work and scale up things we need?”


A good example is Blog RSS to Email automation. For smaller firms or firms that are used to Mailchimp or ESPs, this is an obvious, easy win: get our blog/newsletter automated. But at some companies, the benefit may not be that large compared to the effort. If your database is complex or the blog subscriber level is low, automation isn’t going to solve much, and it will cost more to build out the system than you save in time.


Similarly, you may want to remove technologies due to cost or overlapping features. If a vendor is pitching a tool that overlaps with another tool, perhaps that’s an opportunity to rip out an old technology and reduce a leak in your budget. Some tools are just so old in the Stack, no one remembers why they are there.


Ultimately, there’s a time and place for many tools, it may not be today, and it might have been yesterday.
As your business (or organization) grows or evolves, your MarTech stack needs to keep up.

What members of your organization should be involved in your decision to invest in your MarTech stack?
Definitely depends on the part of the stack we are talking about.

  • Core Team: MOPS, MOPS Leadership
  • Business Owner Team: for Events, the Events teams or leaders.
  • Budget or Finance if it’s over a certain threshold.
  • IT or Product: a large project may involve IT for a security review or integration assistance.

 

Ultimately, it is best to check in with multiple teams as the vendor or project grows in size. I don’t think you need Finance to buy a Zapier subscription, but you might if you do a multi-year Marketo subscription.



What does a successful MarTech stack allow you to accomplish?

A successful stack allows you to automate marketing and sales business processes in a way that you can efficiently report on the funnel and make future decisions on budget allocation. A successful stack will allow each type of marketer and salesperson to work on campaign storytelling and relationship building, rather than analysis.

 

What are the common pitfalls you see in building and maintaining a MarTech stack?

Shiny Object Syndrome is the biggest problem facing Sales, SOPS, MOPS, and Marketers. Vendor salespeople are very happy to work email and phones until they find someone willing to run with the ball. That person may totally bypass MOPS and other processes because they feel the pain the most or were easily persuaded. Marketing technology must be evaluated by MOPS and other technically oriented people to ensure there is a good fit in the stack and the vendor does everything they claim. I’ve seen a lot of projects completely fail because they were driven by misinformed business owners who failed to ask questions internally. Likewise, it is a bad move for MOPS to purchase a tool like Sales Engage without bringing in SOPS and Sales for evaluation.

 

 

Do you have additional considerations for your MarTech stack in 2019? Let us know in the comments! Also, check out our brand new Holiday themed customer newsletter for more content around setting yourself up for a successful 2019.

Marketo's Known Visitor HTML (If Known Visitor, Show Custom HTML in Form Editor » Settings) feature is the obvious answer to a few questions:

 

  • How can I completely ungate an asset no form fillout at all, just a redirect if a web session is is already associated with a known person in my instance?
  • How can I show just a Download button if a session is already associated?
  • How can I auto-submit a form if a session is associated, so I can still switch between the different Advanced Thank You pages in my form setup?

 

Just redirect

This first one is easy: put a <script> that calls location.redirect in your KV HTML. (You do have to manage the redirect URL in JavaScript; it won't use the Thank You URL(s) as you're skipping the form post entirely.)

 

Just a button

The second one is straightforward, too.[1] In the Rich Text editor that pops up when you select Custom HTML, strip everything but the built-in {{form.Button}} token:

 

ss

ss

 

Auto-submit for Known Visitors

The third goal above isn't as easy as you'd expect. If you've dabbled in the Forms 2.0 JS API before, you might think you could do this (purposely screenshot-only so you're not tempted to copy it):

 

ss

 

Nope, that won't work!

 

The reason is a classic bug-you-eventually-round-up-to-intentional: the JS API is not fully supported in KV HTML mode. Important methods like addHiddenFields work, and the whenReady listener itself works, but submit on the Marketo form object doesn't.

 

So we need to go back to the old-school method of simulating a click event on the button. It works just fine in all browsers, even if primitive:

 

ss

 

Copypasta:

 

{{form.Button:default=Auto-submit}}
<script>
MktoForms2.whenReady(function(form){
var formEl = form.getFormElem()[0],
submitEl = formEl.querySelector(".mktoButton");

submitEl.click();
});
</script>

 

 

 

Notes

[1] KV HTML does have an unexpected hidden field autofill (i.e. UTM tracking) gap that relates to the 2nd and 3rd bullets equally, but that's separate enough to be covered in another upcoming post.

The Marketo Master Class series is back with another deep dive into one of the many facets of Marketo: Lead Nurturing. This time around we were lucky enough to team up with Marketo Champion Alumni and Founder of Marketing Rockstar Guides Josh Hill on a special piece of content. Past master classes have drilled into a particular functionality and provided technical tips for navigating the Marketo platform. For this master class, rather than walk through how some of our successful customers leverage Marketo, we wanted to discuss the philosophy every marketer should consider before implementing any and every lead nurturing campaign.

 

1. How did you develop your nurture philosophy?


I developed the Journey Session Framework after working on various nurtures using smart campaigns as well as the Engagement Program. After a few tries, I realized that in order to make it work, there were the five questions to answer. If you cannot answer all of the questions, you won’t be able to launch the nurture properly. In many ways, this harkens back to the old Marketing or Campaign Brief, from a marketing automation point of view.
The Five questions are Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How. But that’s not how I ask them to get the answers we need for a nurture program.

  • Entry – Who
  • Exit – Bad – Why
  • Exit – Goal - Why
  • Cadence - When & How
  • Content – What


If you can concretely answer these questions, you can do amazing work in Marketo.
For example, you might end up with a Journey Doc like this:

  • Entry – Who – people who fill out the free trial form with XYZ fields.
  • Exit Bad – people who unsubscribe or cancel their trial.
  • Exit Goal – people who pay for the service.
  • Cadence: one email within 1 hour and then every 2 days at 2pm afterwards.
  • Content: onboarding emails – 3 to start, we may add 3 more.

 

2. What metrics are you looking at if you’re trying to improve a nurture? (open rates/click rates?)


I am not a big proponent of such metrics for a nurture. These days, clicks are about 80% fake – created by spam bot filters. A click can only tell us a little bit about that particular asset, not whether the journey itself is leading toward the desired lifecycle stage. If your nurture is designed to advance someone (a lead or Account) to MQL or SQL, that’s the only metric to consider.
Remember that your stages are (usually) based on a lead scoring methodology or your funnel methodology, so it is predeterminate to say that “We’re driving 20% more MQLs with this new nurture.” Is that because it takes 1 click to reach MQL? Is it three whitepaper downloads? Are your assets structured to hook into that scoring?
In some sense, you can treat a long term, carefully planned nurture, similar to the lead funnel. The ability to monitor the inflow and outflow of the nurture against the key stages is critical.

  • Entry – how many entered each day or month
  • Exit Bad – how many people fell out because of unsubscribes or excluded traits.
  • Exit Goal – how many people reached our goal – MQL or Upsell.

 

3. How do you make changes to an existing nurture/program without reinventing the wheel or breaking the system?


The best way is to add new content. However, I do encounter this issue frequently. Sometimes the marketer made a mistake, sometimes we add new nurtures and have to shift leads to a different nurture after the fact. Most of the time, at least with an Engagement, this is easy to do with smart lists and campaigns.
The challenge is when you have a Smart Campaign drip, or Irregular drip with wait steps running. If leads are in the flow, you may have to remove them and start again. You can also, if you are careful, adjust the flow steps, however, this is risky. Leads could pop out to the wrong step or you could create a bug in the smart campaign and cause it to fail.

4. How do I determine whether content should be in a separate stream or separate program entirely?


I use my Nurture Waterfall concept to decide things like this. Nurtures aren’t about a set of content, they are about the people. The Waterfall has several nurture programs, or streams, designed to take someone with a limited profile to entice them to offer us more information about themselves. Once they do, we move them to more specific nurtures targeting their Account-Solution-Persona.
Usually if the Lifecycle Stage is different or the Buyer Persona is, that’s a reason to have separate Nurture systems. Depending on how you structure the Streams, you can either do this by Persona-Stage or separate the Nurtures. There’s no perfect way to handle this.

 

5. What are the common pitfalls you see in nurture planning and execution?

 

Lack of planning.

Lack of content.
If you don’t understand the Journey Questions, you won’t be able to build the nurture in Marketo or any system.
It is critical to have a continuous stream of content to add to the Streams to extend the nurture as most B2B buyers will take months to years to be ready for your sales people.
The other pitfall is this strange assumption that every nurture begins with 4 emails. The assumption blocks a successful nurture because:

  1. Four emails are rarely enough. Most marketers can barely get 4 emails finalized on Day 1 and then they will rarely come back to add more than four. If you know it takes 60 days to reach SQL and 180 days to make a sale, why is your journey 4 emails?
  2. Only need one email on Day 1. Create a rolling schedule of new content. Your audience won’t notice if there’s a delay, but you definitely need to feed the machine or risk a dead list. Psychologically, creating one email at a time is less daunting than building a 49 week nurture.

 

6. In what situations would you want to leverage a nurture program over any other program?

 

This isn’t the right question. A nurture program is part of a continuous multi-channel effort. People should find content organically or through advertisements, then opt in to further communications. The nurturing program keeps your audience engaged while specific Events, Webinars, Videos, etc will spark their interest further. Of course, not everyone, but enough to keep business moving.

 

Each lead who opts in from offline events should enter a long term nurture. Leads who don’t advance in the funnel should move to an appropriate stream related to the reasons they did not work out this time.

 

We hope you learned some key takeaways to think about while planning your next nurture campaign. Do you have a nurture checklist of your own? We would love to hear about it in the comments!

***Posted on behalf of Rachel Noble, Manager of Client Services at Digital Pi***

 

Reporting on multi-touch attribution

If you have Revenue Explorer (aka Marketo Advanced Report Builder), you’ve seen (FT) and (MT) show up on a number of reports. Marketo gives a full breakdown of these two distinct types of attribution, but today we are going to focus on (MT): Multi-Touch.

 

Traditionally, multi-touch attribution provides demand-generation analysis.

 

Multi-Touch answers a complicated business question, "Which programs are most influential in moving people forward in the sales cycle over time?"

- Marketo

 

To get a basic understanding of how multi-touch attribution really works, let’s start by looking at the Opportunity Influence Analyzer in the Analytics section of Marketo.

Image_01_Elevate_DC.jpg

 

For any opportunity, Marketo will show the story of how that opportunity was influenced by marketing. The little red dots above are clickable, and are comprised of interesting moments and program successes.

Image_02_Elevate_DC.jpg

Understanding which marketing interactions influenced an opportunity will help you understand multi-touch attribution. (MT) is essentially the same story, but presented in a way that allows you to aggregate or slice-and-dice the data. In Revenue Explorer, (MT) is calculated by taking an opportunity and splitting credit evenly between each program success.

 

For example, let’s take Jane Doe. She attended a webinar, visited your booth at a tradeshow, and then downloaded an eBook from your website. Shortly after, an opportunity for $300,000 was opened and associated with her contact record. Now, we have $300k of pipeline that can be directly connected with the webinar, tradeshow, and eBook. A (MT) opportunity report will credit ⅓ of the opportunity to each of these, and a (MT) pipeline report will credit $100,000 each to the webinar, tradeshow, and eBook.

 

Let’s look at one more example: John Smith. He was acquired via a list purchase, engaged with a direct mail piece, and then visited your booth at the same tradeshow before an opportunity for $100,000 was opened and associated with John. Since the list purchase was not a program success, it will not receive credit when using (MT) attribution. But the direct mail and tradeshow engagements were successes, so each will receive ½ an opportunity, and $50,000 pipeline credit.

 

Now that we know how multi-touch is calculated, we can pull pipeline reports per program. Perhaps we want to know how much (MT) pipeline is associated with the tradeshow. In this case, Revenue Explorer will credit the $100,000 from Jane and the $50,000 from John for a total of $150k in pipeline from the show.

 

Image_03_Elevate_DC.jpg

 

Now, we can aggregate the data. What if we want to know the total pipeline associated with all of the tradeshows? A multi-touch pipeline report by channel will return the total sum of (MT) pipeline associated with each channel.

 

Image_04_Elevate_DC.jpg

 

How do you know when to use (MT) attribution?

(MT) focuses on program successes, which are direct representations of engagement. If your goal is to drive engagement (or MQLs, or pipeline, or demand generation, etc.), then you should use a multi-touch attribution report. If, however, your goal is new-name acquisition, stay away from these reports and focus on first-touch attribution instead.

 

Reporting when you use dynamic content

There are two places in Marketo where you can use Dynamic Content: on a landing page or in an email. Today, we’re going to focus on reporting when you use dynamic content in an email.

 

Dynamic content allows a marketer to deliver the same email to an audience with content variations based on segmentation. For example, if you have your database segmented by industry, you can send someone in the education industry Email A with an introduction specific to education, and a generic introduction to everyone else. It’s a powerful tool, but reporting on dynamic content can be complicated.

 

Of course, you can always create an Email Performance Report or an Email Link Performance Report to understand the performance of the overall email, but what if you want to understand how each dynamic variation performed? Here’s the easiest method. First, create an Email Performance Report. In the Smart List, add a filter referencing a specific segment:

Image_05_Elevate_DC.jpg

Cloning this report and updating the segment will give you a separate report for each version of the email that went out.

 

However, there’s a catch! It is possible for someone’s industry segment to change between the time they receive the email and the time you pull your report. So how do you know for sure which version someone received?

 

When building your program, first identify how many versions of the email you will have. Let’s say in this example, we have industry-specific dynamic content for:

  • Education
  • Manufacturing
  • Technology

As well as a generic email for everyone else.

 

When we send the email, we will also create a smart campaign to assign recipients to static lists depending on their segment.

If you've been around the block with Marketo Smart Lists, you know there's no Ends With operator, only Starts With and Contains.[1]

 

This puts a damper on a common need: accurately searching for an email domain (@gmail.com, @example.co.uk) or TLD (firmographic clues like .edu, geographic ccTLDs like .cn).[2]

 

Some have attempted extravagant combos of Contains and Not Contains, which require a whole lot of prep just to determine that... they don't work. (Read my comments on the linked post for some examples of how such approaches are broken.)

 

There's a much easier way: maintain a custom field, here called Matchable Email, that always holds the value of {{Lead.Email Address}} followed immediately by two quotation marks "":

 

ss

 

ss

 

Then, to do a domain search, search that Matchable Email field for Contains @example.com"", which is equivalent to searching the original Email Address for Ends With @example.com:

 

ss

 

Pretty easy, right?

 

Why two quotation marks (“”)?

The key is to add a sequence of characters to the end of the email address that can never occur in the middle of the email address, so Contains @{{domain}}{{characters}} is functionally equivalent to Ends With @{{domain}}.

 

Finding those appropriate {{characters}} is a lot harder than it sounds. For awhile I was lazily appending $ to the end, because I like the fact that the dollar sign represents end-of-line in regular expressions, so it was easy to remember. But the email address "$ke$ha@marketo.com$"@gmail.com — note the quotation marks around the mailbox part, it wouldn't be valid without those — is a Gmail account, but would match Contains @marketo.com$.

 

Yes, RFC 5321 is just that generous. There are so many crazy-but-valid email addresses, however inadvisable it would be to use them in the real world, that it's hard to find something that, without exception, can only occur outside of a valid address and so can be used as your anchor point.[3]

 

I think I've found that something, though. Two quotation marks in a row "" can occur inside an email address, but they can never be preceded by a character that is a valid part of a domain name.

 

Let me explain.

 

First of all, as you may already be confused by this part, it's possible to have a quoted mailbox name (called a quoted-string in the standard). That's how you can add spaces on the mailbox side of the @: "sandy spacebot"@teknkl.com is a valid SMTP address.

 

You can also put quotation marks inside an already quoted mailbox name, but if you do so, you have to escape them with a backslash.  Thus "Clarence "Frogman""@henry.com" is not a valid email address, but if you escape the quotes as "Clarence \"Frogman\""@henry.com it is valid. Even though this address has two quotes in a row "" (see the characters right before the @?) they are by necessity preceded by a \.  And the \ can never be at the end of a domain name. 

 

Therefore you can accurately search the Matchable Email field for a string that Contains @gmail.com"", knowing that that sequence of characters cannot be found at the start or middle of the value, only at the end.

 

Enjoy!

 

 


 

 

Notes

[1] As a sometime database architect, I've never understood the technical reasoning and figure it must be just legacy-code-nobody-wants-to-touch syndrome. When searching strings, Starts With is faster than Ends With unless specific indexing is used; yet Contains and Ends With have equivalent performance — often terrible performance, don't get me wrong, but roughly the same either way. Plus, it's way easier to add indexing to speed up Ends With than it is to optimize Contains (an index on the reversed value in the first case, n-grams in the second case, FWIW). But here we are.

 

[2] My colleague EU points out that Marketo attempts to optimize a search for a domain-like pattern, one that begins with the character @, and turn it into an SMTP domain search. The problem is that it still doesn't work: The valid address "me@gmail.com"@outlook.com will (as we would expect given the concept of contains) match both Contains @gmail.com and Contains @outlook.com so it doesn't successfully emulate Ends With. It will also false negative on Contains @outlook.co, which is just plain wrong.

 

[3] The way to do this in a technically complete manner is to add an ASCII control character (like ASCII 30 RECORD SEPARATOR, one of my faves) which is never allowed, not even in quotes. But while you can append such a character with a specially hacked Change Data Value, searching for those characters is, unless it's just a one-time thing, effectively impossible. So we'll have to make do with "".

Hadn't even heard of Appointlet until the other day, but when user SS mentioned he was trying to use the REST API to integrate an Appointlet widget with Marketo, I knew there had to be a better way. (There's almost always a more reliable + scalable alternative to server-to-server API calls for what should be browser-side integrations, Unbounce being another example.)

 

In line with services like ChiliPiper, TimeTrade, Calendly, et al. Appointlet is a service I wish I'd thought of because I'd be rich right now dedicated to scheduling. It interacts with a cloud calendar — O365 or Google calendar in this case — in real time to check availability, alerts reps of new bookings, and sends periodic reminders. (Again, no endorsement intended, just describing the published features... only spent 1/2 hr figuring out the API, so perhaps the platform might turn out to have humongous bugs, but it definitely looks useful enough so far!)

 

The Appointlet embed code gives you a button, which when clicked brings up the rep's availability:

 

 

And then a place for the lead to enter their personal info (more fields can be added but these are the defaults):

 

 

Naturally, when you're offering an Appointlet Book Now instead of a full Marketo form, the questions are:

 

  • How do you insert/merge the lead's info into Marketo?
  • How do you make sure past + future web activities are associated with the newly identified lead, i.e. how do you associate the Munchkin cookie with the lead, the way it works with a Marketo form?

 

The best answers are definitely not found in the Marketo REST API. Appointlet does offer outbound HTTP callbacks (accurately called webhooks, but they must not be in any way confused with Marketo's outbound 'hooks). So yes, you could set up your own gateway to receive said callbacks, and you could map them to the Marketo REST API endpoints (plural) that sort-of-maybe emulate a Marketo form post. But that means raw coding labor, new servers to maintain, and Denial of Service exposure. And no upside.

 

Instead the answer, as usual, is to simply post a Marketo form in the background, relaying the lead info from the Appointlet UI.

 

To do this reliably, Appointlet needs to have a client-side JS API. And indeed they do!

 

The Appointlet widget itself is rendered in an IFRAME, and like other sophisticated IFRAME-based embeds (the YouTube player, for example) the widget sends standard browser events to the parent document (that is, to the outer Landing Page) that include interesting info from the widget. We just have to listen for those events, add corresponding values to a Marketo form, and submit. Then we'll get a standard Filled Out Form activity in the Marketo Activity Log, which you can trigger and filter on like any other, and past + future Visited Web Page and Clicked Link on Web Page activities from that browser get merged in, too.

 

Step 1 of 3: Create a form

So first, set up a form that'll catch submissions from your Appointlet widget. (You can set up more than one form if you want to see cosmetically different Filled Out Form names for different pages, but it's not necessary and you don't want to create complexity.)

 

It doesn't need any fields at all, since we'll be populating the fields via API, but you can leave the default 3 fields in place. Just don't make any of them Required.

 

 

Step 2 of 3: Add the Marketo form to your page, with the <form> element not displayed

Inline style="display:none;" is easiest. With the embed code:

 

<form style="display:none;" id="mktoForm_787" class="mktoForm"></form>

 

With a Guided Marketo LP:

 

<div class="mktoForm" id="appointletForm" mktoName="Appointlet Hidden Form" style="display:none;"></div>

 

Or you can put it in a separate <style> which is more professional I suppose.

 

Step 3 of 3: Add the Forms 2.0 API custom JS

This is of course the meat of the solution.

 

MktoForms2.whenReady(function(mktoForm) {
var appointletUserConfig = {
allowedOrigins : ["https://teknkl.appointlet.com"],
formFields : [
{
appointletName : "first-name",
marketoName : "FirstName"
},
{
appointletName : "last-name",
marketoName : "LastName"
}
]
};

/* NO NEED TO TOUCH BELOW THIS LINE! */

window.addEventListener("message", function(message) {

var appointletGlobalConfig = {
messageType : {
TYPE_BOOKING_CREATED : "booking:created"
},
pattern : {
RE_AL_POSTMSG : /^appointlet:/
},
err : {
ERROR_NON_ORIGIN : "Message received from non-Appointlet origin",
ERROR_BAD_JSON : "Message received from Appointlet API but could not be parsed"
}
};

var appointletEvent,
isAlOrigin,
isAlBookingCreated,
mktoFieldsObj = {};

isAlOrigin = appointletUserConfig.allowedOrigins.some(function(origin){ return origin == message.origin; });
if (!isAlOrigin) {
return;
}

try {
appointletEvent = JSON.parse(message.data.replace(appointletGlobalConfig.pattern.RE_AL_POSTMSG, ""));
} catch (err) {
return console.log(appointletGlobalConfig.err.ERR_BAD_JSON);
}

if (appointletEvent.type == appointletGlobalConfig.messageType.TYPE_BOOKING_CREATED) {
mktoFieldsObj["Email"] = appointletEvent.data.email;
appointletUserConfig.formFields.forEach(function(fieldDesc){
mktoFieldsObj[fieldDesc.marketoName] = appointletEvent.data.fields.filter(function(alField){
return alField.field.slug == fieldDesc.appointletName;
})[0].value;
})
mktoForm.addHiddenFields(mktoFieldsObj);
mktoForm.submit();
}
});
});

 

Most of the code is no-touch, but there's a short config area at the top where you put your company-specific variables. From your Appointlet settings, get your Booking Page URL. That goes in the allowedOrigins config property:

 

 

Then the formFields property is an array that maps each Appointlet field name to its corresponding Marketo field name. (You didn't think it would be so easy that the separate products would miraculously use the same names, didja?) I filled in the First Name and Last Name mappings for you. Names of additional custom fields can be found via browser inspection, the Appointlet » Form Fields UI, and the SOAP API Name column of a Marketo UI » Field Management CSV export.

 

And that's it! Now, any confirmed Appointlet booking will post the form to Marketo.

 

What about the rest of the Appointlet setup?

That's on you. I found it very easy to set up an Appointlet account, link to a test Google Calendar, and grab the button code. But since I don't want to imply an outright endorsement, better to leave the rest of the product evaluation in your hands.

To switch up the Nancy Sinatra song, Booleans keep truthin’, when they ought to be falsin’.

 

As explored in earlier blog posts, when Marketo exposes Boolean fields in Velocity fields on the Lead/Person object, not on other objects they become Strings, not real Booleans.

 

And they're not even very Boolean-like Strings: they have values "1" and "" (the empty string) which in Velocity are both truthy values.[1]

 

As a result, you can't use a standard Boolean expression

 

#if( $isCustomer )
You're a customer.
#else
Wouldn't you like to be a customer?
#end

 

because everyone will match the first condition.

 

You have to be more exact, unfortunately making your code less self-documenting:

 

#if( $isCustomer == "1" )
You're a customer.
#else
Wouldn't you like to be a customer?
#end

 

Now, this more verbose version may not seem like a big deal, but I consider it to be poor programming practice because it relies on a “magic string”: a person reading your code has no way to know that "1" has some special significance and that the variable could not hold any other string value. That is, any Boolean-ish thing should be an enumeration only allowing 2 values (one representing true and one representing false, whatever those values might be) but since it's a freeform String it has no such restriction.

 

So here's something you can add to your global {{my.velocityIncludes}} token. (You do have such a token, don't you?  All the cool kids do.)

 

 

#set( $mktoBoolean = { "1" : true, "" : false } )

 

 

With that one-time include (put it in the <head> of your templates) now you can refer to those Boolean-ish fields like so:

 

#if( $mktoBoolean[$isCustomer] )
You're a customer.
#else
Wouldn't you like to be a customer?
#end

 

Now it's clear that you're using the variable as a Boolean.

 

I've recently decided this simple method is good enough. In the past I'd been  using a list (manually maintained in {{my.velocityIncludes}}) of known Boolean field names, then “massaging” those fields on the lead to turn them into real Booleans before using them. But that takes prep work and IM(new)O isn't worth it.

 

Code breakdown (if you need it)

The snippet above is just the kind of thing that can make new devs think VTL syntax works a certain way, and then try to adapt it to other scenarios only to find syntax errors.

 

So let me explain exactly what's happening, as short as it is.

 

First, let me add line breaks for readability:

 

#set( $mktoBoolean = { 
  "1" : true, 
  "" : false
} )

 

By using Velocity's map literal syntax we're creating a simple Map object with 2 keys.

 

(Informal/imprecise terms for such an object are Hash, HashTable or Dictionary, and the exact type is LinkedHashMap. Also feel like noting that even though Velocity's map literal syntax looks the same as JavaScript's object literal syntax, it creates an object that is different in one critical way, though that difference isn't relevant here.[2])

 

The keys in the Map can have any values, even including null, and can certainly include any kind of string, including an empty string. You access the keys in a Map using .get, bracketed-property syntax or, when it can be parsed unambiguously, dot-property syntax.

 

So for a more general example, if we defined this Map:

 

#set( $someOtherMap = {
  "FaveFruit" : "apple",
  "FaveVeg" : "broccoli"
} )

 

Then we can use one of 3 equivalent ways to access the person's favorite fruit:

 

$someOtherMap.get("FaveFruit")
$someOtherMap["FaveFruit"]
$someOtherMap.FaveFruit

 

Those all address the same key and will all show apple.

 

In the specific case of the $mktoBoolean Map, we can't use the 3rd option of dot-property syntax though, because $mktoBoolean.1 isn't a valid expression in Velocity Template Language since it starts with a number.  We're limited to

 

$mktoBoolean.get("1")
$mktoBoolean["1"]

 

This limitation isn't a big or surprising deal, by the way. Just one of a zillion cases where certain accessing syntax might be unusable, but that doesn't mean the initial definition of the variable was wrong. Sometimes you end up limiting the ways to refer to object keys — another common case is when a string key has a space in it ({ "My Other Car" : "Lambo" }), which also doesn't work with dot-syntax so you have to use $someOtherMap["My Other Car"] or $someOtherMap.get("My Other Car") — but you get other benefits in return.

 

Aaaaanyway, so we have a Map with 2 keys, both Strings. The value of each key is a real Boolean: I used the literal Boolean values true and false, not Strings.

 

That means we can use bracket-syntax to access the corresponding key in the Map, which will return a Boolean.  When I do

 

#if( $mktoBoolean[$isCustomer] )

 

I'm getting the value from the $mktoBoolean Map that matches the key $isCustomer. That is, within our reserved world of "1" and "", I'm always getting either $mktoBoolean["1"] or $mktoBoolean[""], and those values are both Booleans so the result can be used clearly and consistently.

 

Hope that all made sense!

 

 


 

 

Notes

[1] In Velocity's underlying Java environment, these would both be String instances and thus neither true nor false; they'd throw fatal errors if you tried to use them as Booleans. (Unlike other languages you might have used, in pure Java only an actual java.lang.Boolean can be used in a Boolean expression; there's no concept of truthy or falsy strings or numbers.)

 

But VTL is an often frustrating “friendlier” dialect on top of Java which minimizes visible errors. In VTL, #if ($someStringVariable) won't chuck an error message into your email; yet the logic it uses is basically “everything but exact Boolean false or null is true” which can be very misleading.

 

[2] That way being that the keys in a LinkedHashMap are ordered. Key order has no bearing on the way $mktoBoolean is used in this scenario, but it's a classic source of confusion in object-land. In JavaScript, object literal syntax creates a plain JS Object, which is unordered and is roughly like a simpler Java HashMap.

At Marketo, we understand that sharing knowledge with your peers is a great way to help accelerate learning. That’s why we partnered with our 2018 Marketo Champions to pull together a new ebook that dives into how you can use Marketo like some of our top performers. The new ebook, titled [Marketo Success] Guide, provides detailed insights on everything from setting up email templates to which reports you should be pulling to prove your impact on revenue. Check out an excerpt from the ebook below written by Chelsea Kiko, Marketing Automation Team Lead at Hileman Group to learn how she utilizes Marketo Segmentation.

 

What Is Segmentation?

Segmentation categorizes your audience into different subgroups based on a defined criterion that you establish in a Smart List. Once you create those subgroups, those are called segments. The best way to think about it is that a segmentation is a permanent smart list with the segments being the different targeted audience you define.

 

Why Use It?

Segmentations are important if you want to personalize your content to the specific audience you create. By creating and using dynamic content and snippets, you can personalize content based on who or where your end user is. For example, you can create an email to read a different call-to-action based on the segment in Texas. Dallas leads would see a different message than Austin leads because of the use of dynamic content tailored for each segment.

 

Dynamic Content—Once you've created different segments, you can add dynamic content blocks into your landing page or email. This tells Marketo that you want that piece of content to be different depending on which person views it.

 

Snippets—Create it once, and scale it. If you update the snippet, all the assets (landing pages or emails) using the snippet will be automatically updated.

 

How to Create a Segmentation

Below you’ll find a step-by-step guide to creating a segmentation in Marketo:

  • Navigate to lead database

Seg_Champion_EBook_Image01.jpg

 

  • Find the Segmentations Folder, right click and select new segmentation

Seg_Champion_EBook_Image02.jpg

 

  • Name your segmentation, select add segment to start creating the permanent smart list segments within that segmentation

Seg_Champion_EBook_Image03.jpg

 

  • Start adding segments and naming. Note: you will always have a default segment.
  • Next, this is just like creating a smart list. Pick the criteria and filters need to complete your segment
  • Put your segments in order. This is important because a lead will be located in the first segment of where they qualify

Seg_Champion_EBook_Image04.jpg

  • Click create
  • Take one last look at the number of people who qualify for each segment
  • Approve, it may take a while for the segmentation to be ready depending on the size of your database

 

Note: Once a segment is approved, you cannot edit. Rather, you must create a draft and then reapprove the segment/segmentation. Another folder will appear when you go to edit that is labeled ‘drafts’. You can only edit segments of the draft and not approved segmentation.

Seg_Champion_EBook_Image05.jpg

Remember, segmentations are mutually exclusive to workspaces. Each workspace can have its own set of segmentations.

 

Putting Segmentations to Use

Dynamic content is a strategic way to personalize content in Marketo assets. Personalization has been huge in marketing automation because it is going beyond traditional emails at the right time, to an even more memorable user experience.

 

Here are a few quick stats from to show how impactful personalized content can be:

  • 81% of consumers want brands to understand them better and know when and when not to approach them. – MarTech Today
  • 78% of consumers say personally relevant content increases their purchase intent. – Marketing Insider Group
  • 88% of U.S. marketers reported seeing measurable improvements due to personalization—with more than half reporting a lift greater than 10%. – Evergage

 

So, personalization works. Even as a consumer myself, I get all giddy when I see a personalized email or landing page. Dynamic content is a great start when working in Marketo, so let’s show you some examples.

 

Real-Life Marketo Example

At my last company, we were sticklers about deliverability rate. We were a big corporate company and our database wasn’t the healthiest until my team took over before my time. We consistently managed our data for bad data qualities (invalid emails, hard bounces, you know the deal)—but we also wanted to make sure our deliverability rate was top-notch because we suffered bad deliverability before my team joined.

 

From there, we created a marketable segmentation.

 

Our team was sick of cloning the perfect smart list and customizing, and then adding in all of the filters

 

We wanted to add to avoid sending any emails to bad data in the database so creating the segment was a great way to easily add in to make sure we only email the marketable segment.

 

The logic included filters like: blacklist =false; email invalid =false; email bounced=false; unsubscribed=false; marketing suspended= false; etc.

 

Even though it was a quick segmentation and was only used purely for sending emails (not dynamic content or reporting metrics)—our team saw a 9% increase in our deliverability rate simply by taking 15 minutes to create a segmentation to not even email those who are bad data.

 

******

 

We hope you enjoyed reading this excerpt from the upcoming [Marketo Success] Guide: Best Practices from Marketo Champions. Now it’s your turn, download the attached segmentation worksheet created by Marketo Champion, Brooke Bartos, Marketing Automation Manager at Walk Sands Communication, and start improving your segmentation today.

 

Keep an eye out for more tidbits from the new ebook that is launching in early 2019 (check out the excerpt on engagement program management here). Have questions about the content? Let us know in the comments!

**Posting on behalf of Chelsea Kiko Marketing Automation Team Lead at Hileman Group**

 

Reporting in Various Marketo Spaces

I have been building Marketo architecture and planning strategic marketing automation plans for about five years now and I still get the Marketo question about reporting. ‘Is that in Marketing Activities or Analytics section?’ – and there is a lot of confusion about which is better, which holds what type of reporting and what works best for subscriptions.

For me, it really comes down to the question ‘what are you trying to report?’ – if it is instance-wide and holistic reporting, I want to always say head to the analytics section to build those reports. However, there are reasons for usage of both and I will go through that in this blog post.

 

The biggest difference between program-level marketing activities reporting is the level of the reporting you want to accomplish. Analytics section is for that holistic reporting on a large group of assets/activities or even the whole instance. Also, if you want to see more details on ‘who’ not just the numbers, then program level reporting is your best bet as it can dive into the details a little more than analytics reporting can, and also, it makes more sense to build some reports next to the programs so that folder/reporting organization is intact.

 

I am going to talk about key factors and which reporting space would be a better for common situations.

 

Dashboard/Monthly Instance-Wide Reporting

I use analytics reporting for all my high-level reporting for my instance. For example, if I want to see how all my emails are doing YTD – I will use email insights and get that reporting. However, you can change your time period and pick and choose what emails you report on – but, this is a nice view for high level reporting or dashboards.

Image_01_Elevate_Analytics.jpg

 

Speaking of dashboards, depending on what type of tool you use, you may have to have data sources plug in to that external platform. Or, maybe you have a reporting dashboard where you still check out the instance and record it. Either way, it is great to organize reporting for dashboards in the analytics section. This makes it clean, easy to find and doesn’t get cluttered by marketing activities programs that are being deployed.

Image_02_Elevate_Analytics.jpg

 

**Expert Tip** [see below]– one nice feature of analytics reporting is you can actually layer on smart lists to your reporting to add additional detail for a holistic report. The below screenshot shows a lead lifecycle report with additional UTM smart lists so we can see exactly where each lead came from within the lead lifecycle. This is simply done by creating the smart lists and then adding them in within the setup tab of the report. You can also drill down on certain fields or attributes to see more information about the report. For example, say you want to add the custom columns of various UTMs and then drill down the reporting by company name – below is how you’d do that to achieve more data. This cannot be done to this extent in marketing activities.

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User & Roles

This is a popular reason to do reporting in analytics (or database) vs program level, marketing activities reporting. Many times, we want to make sure we have our users and roles to the point where it makes sense for the organization. If you tend to have a marketing person go rogue in Marketo when they want to see reporting but then manipulate or change marketing programs, you can lock them down to just see the analytics area of Marketo. Or, another reason for this would be for possibly a role where a team member’s role is to report how the marketing influenced campaigns are helping overall ROI. This way, you can give the user access to analytics, send them the Marketo link and they can export their own data. For example, Matty Marqeto is your analytics manager and he needs to see pre-built reports (or reports he builds on his own) in order to connect his dashboard and complete his role on the team. You can give him access to just the analytics section of Marketo so he can get in, pull the numbers he needs, and then go about his day. You can also do this in the database section of Marketo for smart lists. If you want to build out a smart list of data and don’t want to give the analytics manager or campaign reporter access to marketing activities – you can build the smart list in database and give the user access to database and analytics section only in Marketo. You can even choose if the user can export data or not – which is a nice feature.

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Specific Reporting by Campaign

It is best practice to build reports in advance within a program process template so when a new program is created or cloned, you have readily available common reporting within each program. This can help the campaign stakeholders know what reporting is available and be able to easily see the reporting in the program instead of searching in analytics.

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It is nice to have these reports ready because campaign specific reporting should be done at the program level versus in analytics so the organization is consistent and campaign stakeholders know where to find the reporting.

 

Subscriptions

Both the marketing activities reporting and analytics reporting can create subscriptions to be mailed to a user on a predetermined frequency. All you have to do is create the report how you want and then right click and create new subscription. The subscription will live where the report lives, so remember that if you want someone to have access to be able to modify the report. For example, Susan cannot edit her smart list report from her event in analytics section if the report lives in marketing activities.

 

Ad Hoc Reporting & Troubleshooting

Lastly, another common reason why users dive into the marketing activities program reporting versus analytics is for additional reporting and troubleshooting within campaigns. It makes sense to keep everything grouped together. When troubleshooting a potential area within a campaign, many times smart list reporting or even local asset reporting is used to see what an issue could be and how it can be resolved. Building these in the programs is best practice so all of the data is organized within the campaign and doesn’t get lost in another area of the platform like analytics.

 

The same goes for ad hoc reporting. For example, you have a unique campaign that needs some extra reporting for various campaign owners, so building it within the tree organization in the campaign makes sense to all parties. The reports can be easily found and reported on that campaign only.

 

Those are some common reasons to use one section of Marketo over the other and some extra details on why. Reporting with third parties can make these practices change as well as internal team organization.

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