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4 Posts authored by: Katie Pedroza Employee

***Posted on behalf of Rachel Noble, Manager of Client Services at Digital Pi***

 

Reporting on multi-touch attribution

If you have Revenue Explorer (aka Marketo Advanced Report Builder), you’ve seen (FT) and (MT) show up on a number of reports. Marketo gives a full breakdown of these two distinct types of attribution, but today we are going to focus on (MT): Multi-Touch.

 

Traditionally, multi-touch attribution provides demand-generation analysis.

 

Multi-Touch answers a complicated business question, "Which programs are most influential in moving people forward in the sales cycle over time?"

- Marketo

 

To get a basic understanding of how multi-touch attribution really works, let’s start by looking at the Opportunity Influence Analyzer in the Analytics section of Marketo.

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For any opportunity, Marketo will show the story of how that opportunity was influenced by marketing. The little red dots above are clickable, and are comprised of interesting moments and program successes.

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Understanding which marketing interactions influenced an opportunity will help you understand multi-touch attribution. (MT) is essentially the same story, but presented in a way that allows you to aggregate or slice-and-dice the data. In Revenue Explorer, (MT) is calculated by taking an opportunity and splitting credit evenly between each program success.

 

For example, let’s take Jane Doe. She attended a webinar, visited your booth at a tradeshow, and then downloaded an eBook from your website. Shortly after, an opportunity for $300,000 was opened and associated with her contact record. Now, we have $300k of pipeline that can be directly connected with the webinar, tradeshow, and eBook. A (MT) opportunity report will credit ⅓ of the opportunity to each of these, and a (MT) pipeline report will credit $100,000 each to the webinar, tradeshow, and eBook.

 

Let’s look at one more example: John Smith. He was acquired via a list purchase, engaged with a direct mail piece, and then visited your booth at the same tradeshow before an opportunity for $100,000 was opened and associated with John. Since the list purchase was not a program success, it will not receive credit when using (MT) attribution. But the direct mail and tradeshow engagements were successes, so each will receive ½ an opportunity, and $50,000 pipeline credit.

 

Now that we know how multi-touch is calculated, we can pull pipeline reports per program. Perhaps we want to know how much (MT) pipeline is associated with the tradeshow. In this case, Revenue Explorer will credit the $100,000 from Jane and the $50,000 from John for a total of $150k in pipeline from the show.

 

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Now, we can aggregate the data. What if we want to know the total pipeline associated with all of the tradeshows? A multi-touch pipeline report by channel will return the total sum of (MT) pipeline associated with each channel.

 

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How do you know when to use (MT) attribution?

(MT) focuses on program successes, which are direct representations of engagement. If your goal is to drive engagement (or MQLs, or pipeline, or demand generation, etc.), then you should use a multi-touch attribution report. If, however, your goal is new-name acquisition, stay away from these reports and focus on first-touch attribution instead.

 

Reporting when you use dynamic content

There are two places in Marketo where you can use Dynamic Content: on a landing page or in an email. Today, we’re going to focus on reporting when you use dynamic content in an email.

 

Dynamic content allows a marketer to deliver the same email to an audience with content variations based on segmentation. For example, if you have your database segmented by industry, you can send someone in the education industry Email A with an introduction specific to education, and a generic introduction to everyone else. It’s a powerful tool, but reporting on dynamic content can be complicated.

 

Of course, you can always create an Email Performance Report or an Email Link Performance Report to understand the performance of the overall email, but what if you want to understand how each dynamic variation performed? Here’s the easiest method. First, create an Email Performance Report. In the Smart List, add a filter referencing a specific segment:

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Cloning this report and updating the segment will give you a separate report for each version of the email that went out.

 

However, there’s a catch! It is possible for someone’s industry segment to change between the time they receive the email and the time you pull your report. So how do you know for sure which version someone received?

 

When building your program, first identify how many versions of the email you will have. Let’s say in this example, we have industry-specific dynamic content for:

  • Education
  • Manufacturing
  • Technology

As well as a generic email for everyone else.

 

When we send the email, we will also create a smart campaign to assign recipients to static lists depending on their segment.

At Marketo, we understand that sharing knowledge with your peers is a great way to help accelerate learning. That’s why we partnered with our 2018 Marketo Champions to pull together a new ebook that dives into how you can use Marketo like some of our top performers. The new ebook, titled [Marketo Success] Guide, provides detailed insights on everything from setting up email templates to which reports you should be pulling to prove your impact on revenue. Check out an excerpt from the ebook below written by Chelsea Kiko, Marketing Automation Team Lead at Hileman Group to learn how she utilizes Marketo Segmentation.

 

What Is Segmentation?

Segmentation categorizes your audience into different subgroups based on a defined criterion that you establish in a Smart List. Once you create those subgroups, those are called segments. The best way to think about it is that a segmentation is a permanent smart list with the segments being the different targeted audience you define.

 

Why Use It?

Segmentations are important if you want to personalize your content to the specific audience you create. By creating and using dynamic content and snippets, you can personalize content based on who or where your end user is. For example, you can create an email to read a different call-to-action based on the segment in Texas. Dallas leads would see a different message than Austin leads because of the use of dynamic content tailored for each segment.

 

Dynamic Content—Once you've created different segments, you can add dynamic content blocks into your landing page or email. This tells Marketo that you want that piece of content to be different depending on which person views it.

 

Snippets—Create it once, and scale it. If you update the snippet, all the assets (landing pages or emails) using the snippet will be automatically updated.

 

How to Create a Segmentation

Below you’ll find a step-by-step guide to creating a segmentation in Marketo:

  • Navigate to lead database

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  • Find the Segmentations Folder, right click and select new segmentation

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  • Name your segmentation, select add segment to start creating the permanent smart list segments within that segmentation

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  • Start adding segments and naming. Note: you will always have a default segment.
  • Next, this is just like creating a smart list. Pick the criteria and filters need to complete your segment
  • Put your segments in order. This is important because a lead will be located in the first segment of where they qualify

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  • Click create
  • Take one last look at the number of people who qualify for each segment
  • Approve, it may take a while for the segmentation to be ready depending on the size of your database

 

Note: Once a segment is approved, you cannot edit. Rather, you must create a draft and then reapprove the segment/segmentation. Another folder will appear when you go to edit that is labeled ‘drafts’. You can only edit segments of the draft and not approved segmentation.

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Remember, segmentations are mutually exclusive to workspaces. Each workspace can have its own set of segmentations.

 

Putting Segmentations to Use

Dynamic content is a strategic way to personalize content in Marketo assets. Personalization has been huge in marketing automation because it is going beyond traditional emails at the right time, to an even more memorable user experience.

 

Here are a few quick stats from to show how impactful personalized content can be:

  • 81% of consumers want brands to understand them better and know when and when not to approach them. – MarTech Today
  • 78% of consumers say personally relevant content increases their purchase intent. – Marketing Insider Group
  • 88% of U.S. marketers reported seeing measurable improvements due to personalization—with more than half reporting a lift greater than 10%. – Evergage

 

So, personalization works. Even as a consumer myself, I get all giddy when I see a personalized email or landing page. Dynamic content is a great start when working in Marketo, so let’s show you some examples.

 

Real-Life Marketo Example

At my last company, we were sticklers about deliverability rate. We were a big corporate company and our database wasn’t the healthiest until my team took over before my time. We consistently managed our data for bad data qualities (invalid emails, hard bounces, you know the deal)—but we also wanted to make sure our deliverability rate was top-notch because we suffered bad deliverability before my team joined.

 

From there, we created a marketable segmentation.

 

Our team was sick of cloning the perfect smart list and customizing, and then adding in all of the filters

 

We wanted to add to avoid sending any emails to bad data in the database so creating the segment was a great way to easily add in to make sure we only email the marketable segment.

 

The logic included filters like: blacklist =false; email invalid =false; email bounced=false; unsubscribed=false; marketing suspended= false; etc.

 

Even though it was a quick segmentation and was only used purely for sending emails (not dynamic content or reporting metrics)—our team saw a 9% increase in our deliverability rate simply by taking 15 minutes to create a segmentation to not even email those who are bad data.

 

******

 

We hope you enjoyed reading this excerpt from the upcoming [Marketo Success] Guide: Best Practices from Marketo Champions. Now it’s your turn, download the attached segmentation worksheet created by Marketo Champion, Brooke Bartos, Marketing Automation Manager at Walk Sands Communication, and start improving your segmentation today.

 

Keep an eye out for more tidbits from the new ebook that is launching in early 2019 (check out the excerpt on engagement program management here). Have questions about the content? Let us know in the comments!

**Posting on behalf of Chelsea Kiko Marketing Automation Team Lead at Hileman Group**

 

Reporting in Various Marketo Spaces

I have been building Marketo architecture and planning strategic marketing automation plans for about five years now and I still get the Marketo question about reporting. ‘Is that in Marketing Activities or Analytics section?’ – and there is a lot of confusion about which is better, which holds what type of reporting and what works best for subscriptions.

For me, it really comes down to the question ‘what are you trying to report?’ – if it is instance-wide and holistic reporting, I want to always say head to the analytics section to build those reports. However, there are reasons for usage of both and I will go through that in this blog post.

 

The biggest difference between program-level marketing activities reporting is the level of the reporting you want to accomplish. Analytics section is for that holistic reporting on a large group of assets/activities or even the whole instance. Also, if you want to see more details on ‘who’ not just the numbers, then program level reporting is your best bet as it can dive into the details a little more than analytics reporting can, and also, it makes more sense to build some reports next to the programs so that folder/reporting organization is intact.

 

I am going to talk about key factors and which reporting space would be a better for common situations.

 

Dashboard/Monthly Instance-Wide Reporting

I use analytics reporting for all my high-level reporting for my instance. For example, if I want to see how all my emails are doing YTD – I will use email insights and get that reporting. However, you can change your time period and pick and choose what emails you report on – but, this is a nice view for high level reporting or dashboards.

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Speaking of dashboards, depending on what type of tool you use, you may have to have data sources plug in to that external platform. Or, maybe you have a reporting dashboard where you still check out the instance and record it. Either way, it is great to organize reporting for dashboards in the analytics section. This makes it clean, easy to find and doesn’t get cluttered by marketing activities programs that are being deployed.

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**Expert Tip** [see below]– one nice feature of analytics reporting is you can actually layer on smart lists to your reporting to add additional detail for a holistic report. The below screenshot shows a lead lifecycle report with additional UTM smart lists so we can see exactly where each lead came from within the lead lifecycle. This is simply done by creating the smart lists and then adding them in within the setup tab of the report. You can also drill down on certain fields or attributes to see more information about the report. For example, say you want to add the custom columns of various UTMs and then drill down the reporting by company name – below is how you’d do that to achieve more data. This cannot be done to this extent in marketing activities.

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User & Roles

This is a popular reason to do reporting in analytics (or database) vs program level, marketing activities reporting. Many times, we want to make sure we have our users and roles to the point where it makes sense for the organization. If you tend to have a marketing person go rogue in Marketo when they want to see reporting but then manipulate or change marketing programs, you can lock them down to just see the analytics area of Marketo. Or, another reason for this would be for possibly a role where a team member’s role is to report how the marketing influenced campaigns are helping overall ROI. This way, you can give the user access to analytics, send them the Marketo link and they can export their own data. For example, Matty Marqeto is your analytics manager and he needs to see pre-built reports (or reports he builds on his own) in order to connect his dashboard and complete his role on the team. You can give him access to just the analytics section of Marketo so he can get in, pull the numbers he needs, and then go about his day. You can also do this in the database section of Marketo for smart lists. If you want to build out a smart list of data and don’t want to give the analytics manager or campaign reporter access to marketing activities – you can build the smart list in database and give the user access to database and analytics section only in Marketo. You can even choose if the user can export data or not – which is a nice feature.

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Specific Reporting by Campaign

It is best practice to build reports in advance within a program process template so when a new program is created or cloned, you have readily available common reporting within each program. This can help the campaign stakeholders know what reporting is available and be able to easily see the reporting in the program instead of searching in analytics.

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It is nice to have these reports ready because campaign specific reporting should be done at the program level versus in analytics so the organization is consistent and campaign stakeholders know where to find the reporting.

 

Subscriptions

Both the marketing activities reporting and analytics reporting can create subscriptions to be mailed to a user on a predetermined frequency. All you have to do is create the report how you want and then right click and create new subscription. The subscription will live where the report lives, so remember that if you want someone to have access to be able to modify the report. For example, Susan cannot edit her smart list report from her event in analytics section if the report lives in marketing activities.

 

Ad Hoc Reporting & Troubleshooting

Lastly, another common reason why users dive into the marketing activities program reporting versus analytics is for additional reporting and troubleshooting within campaigns. It makes sense to keep everything grouped together. When troubleshooting a potential area within a campaign, many times smart list reporting or even local asset reporting is used to see what an issue could be and how it can be resolved. Building these in the programs is best practice so all of the data is organized within the campaign and doesn’t get lost in another area of the platform like analytics.

 

The same goes for ad hoc reporting. For example, you have a unique campaign that needs some extra reporting for various campaign owners, so building it within the tree organization in the campaign makes sense to all parties. The reports can be easily found and reported on that campaign only.

 

Those are some common reasons to use one section of Marketo over the other and some extra details on why. Reporting with third parties can make these practices change as well as internal team organization.

At Marketo, we understand that sharing knowledge with your peers is a great way to help accelerate learning. That’s why we partnered with our 2018 Marketo Champions to pull together a new ebook that dives into how you can leverage Marketo like some of our top performers. The new ebook, titled the [Marketo Success] Guide, provides detailed insights on everything from setting up email templates to which reports you should be pulling to prove your impact on revenue. Check out an excerpt from the ebook below written by Erik Heldebro, Chief Marketing Officer at Bambuser and Rachel Noble, Manager Client Services at Digital Pi to learn how they manage engagement program memberships in Marketo.

 

Managing Engagement Programs

Nurture programs aren’t just hard to conceive. They can be hard to manage, too, especially if you don’t have a program set up for just that purpose. We call this a Nurture Traffic Controller, and here’s how to build one:

  1. Create a Default Operational Program named Nurture Traffic Controller.
  2. In the new program, create three folders: Smart Campaigns, Smart Lists, and Reports.
  3. In the Smart Lists folder, create a Smart List named “1. Nurture Target Audience.” The Smart List criteria should include anyone who would potentially qualify for any nurture program. We’ll specify which program later. Remember that Marketo filters out Unsubscribed, Marketing Suspended, and Blacklisted leads automatically.
  4. If you have one Engagement Program that everyone goes into, skip to step 5. Otherwise, you will need to create additional target audience Smart Lists to identify which Engagement Program qualified leads should go into. For example, if you have an Engagement Program specifically for VP’s, create a Smart List “2. VP Target Audience.”
  5. In the Smart Campaigns folder, create a new Smart Campaign named “1. Add Qualified Leads to Nurture.”
    1. Smart List:

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    1. Flow:
      1. If you have a generic nurture program, your only Flow step should be: Add to Engagement Program -> Generic Engagement Program, Stream=Stream 1. Add choices to determine which stream if you have multiple streams.
      2. If you do not have a generic nurture program, you can use the Smart Lists you created in step 4 to identify which program they should go into
      3. Add to Engagement Program  If Member of Smart List A, Engagement Program A  Stream = Stream 1 and so on. Like in (i), you can also add choices to determine which stream if any of these programs have multiple streams.

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   6. Schedule this to run recurring just before the cast of the nurture program(s). If the casts are not consistent, consider scheduling this daily. Remember that the campaign is set so people can only run through once, so you don’t have to worry about this re-assigning everyone to new nurture programs each time it runs.

   7. If you don’t have any other nurture programs, you’re done! Otherwise, we need to set up transition rules to get people into the correct nurture program. For each additional nurture program, we need to create a new Smart Campaign to transition leads who qualify:

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And that Smart List referenced in Flow step #1?

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Now your leads will be in the right Engagement Programs!

 

Engagement Program Checklist

When setting up your Engagement Programs, here’s a checklist you can use to make sure you have everything you need.

  • Engagement Program built
  • Content Streams created
  • Unsubscribed/Invalid Stream created
  • Transition Rules defined
  • Smart Campaign to track success at the Engagement Program level built and activated
  • Emails added to nested Default Programs within the Engagement Program
  • Smart Campaigns to track success at nested Default Program level built and activated
  • Excluded Smart Campaigns built-in nested Default Programs and activated
  • Default Programs/Email Assets added to streams
  • Default Programs/Email Assets activated in streams
  • Cadence/first Cast scheduled
  • Traffic Controller created/updated

 

We hope you enjoyed reading this excerpt from the upcoming [Marketo Success] Guide: Best Practices from Marketo Champions. Keep an eye out for more tidbits from the new ebook that is launching in late 2018. Have questions about the content? Let us know in the comments!

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