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2018

At Marketo, we understand that sharing knowledge with your peers is a great way to help accelerate learning. That’s why we partnered with our 2018 Marketo Champions to pull together a new ebook that dives into how you can use Marketo like some of our top performers. The new ebook, titled [Marketo Success] Guide, provides detailed insights on everything from setting up email templates to which reports you should be pulling to prove your impact on revenue. Check out an excerpt from the ebook below written by Chelsea Kiko, Marketing Automation Team Lead at Hileman Group to learn how she utilizes Marketo Segmentation.

 

What Is Segmentation?

Segmentation categorizes your audience into different subgroups based on a defined criterion that you establish in a Smart List. Once you create those subgroups, those are called segments. The best way to think about it is that a segmentation is a permanent smart list with the segments being the different targeted audience you define.

 

Why Use It?

Segmentations are important if you want to personalize your content to the specific audience you create. By creating and using dynamic content and snippets, you can personalize content based on who or where your end user is. For example, you can create an email to read a different call-to-action based on the segment in Texas. Dallas leads would see a different message than Austin leads because of the use of dynamic content tailored for each segment.

 

Dynamic Content—Once you've created different segments, you can add dynamic content blocks into your landing page or email. This tells Marketo that you want that piece of content to be different depending on which person views it.

 

Snippets—Create it once, and scale it. If you update the snippet, all the assets (landing pages or emails) using the snippet will be automatically updated.

 

How to Create a Segmentation

Below you’ll find a step-by-step guide to creating a segmentation in Marketo:

  • Navigate to lead database

Seg_Champion_EBook_Image01.jpg

 

  • Find the Segmentations Folder, right click and select new segmentation

Seg_Champion_EBook_Image02.jpg

 

  • Name your segmentation, select add segment to start creating the permanent smart list segments within that segmentation

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  • Start adding segments and naming. Note: you will always have a default segment.
  • Next, this is just like creating a smart list. Pick the criteria and filters need to complete your segment
  • Put your segments in order. This is important because a lead will be located in the first segment of where they qualify

Seg_Champion_EBook_Image04.jpg

  • Click create
  • Take one last look at the number of people who qualify for each segment
  • Approve, it may take a while for the segmentation to be ready depending on the size of your database

 

Note: Once a segment is approved, you cannot edit. Rather, you must create a draft and then reapprove the segment/segmentation. Another folder will appear when you go to edit that is labeled ‘drafts’. You can only edit segments of the draft and not approved segmentation.

Seg_Champion_EBook_Image05.jpg

Remember, segmentations are mutually exclusive to workspaces. Each workspace can have its own set of segmentations.

 

Putting Segmentations to Use

Dynamic content is a strategic way to personalize content in Marketo assets. Personalization has been huge in marketing automation because it is going beyond traditional emails at the right time, to an even more memorable user experience.

 

Here are a few quick stats from to show how impactful personalized content can be:

  • 81% of consumers want brands to understand them better and know when and when not to approach them. – MarTech Today
  • 78% of consumers say personally relevant content increases their purchase intent. – Marketing Insider Group
  • 88% of U.S. marketers reported seeing measurable improvements due to personalization—with more than half reporting a lift greater than 10%. – Evergage

 

So, personalization works. Even as a consumer myself, I get all giddy when I see a personalized email or landing page. Dynamic content is a great start when working in Marketo, so let’s show you some examples.

 

Real-Life Marketo Example

At my last company, we were sticklers about deliverability rate. We were a big corporate company and our database wasn’t the healthiest until my team took over before my time. We consistently managed our data for bad data qualities (invalid emails, hard bounces, you know the deal)—but we also wanted to make sure our deliverability rate was top-notch because we suffered bad deliverability before my team joined.

 

From there, we created a marketable segmentation.

 

Our team was sick of cloning the perfect smart list and customizing, and then adding in all of the filters

 

We wanted to add to avoid sending any emails to bad data in the database so creating the segment was a great way to easily add in to make sure we only email the marketable segment.

 

The logic included filters like: blacklist =false; email invalid =false; email bounced=false; unsubscribed=false; marketing suspended= false; etc.

 

Even though it was a quick segmentation and was only used purely for sending emails (not dynamic content or reporting metrics)—our team saw a 9% increase in our deliverability rate simply by taking 15 minutes to create a segmentation to not even email those who are bad data.

 

******

 

We hope you enjoyed reading this excerpt from the upcoming [Marketo Success] Guide: Best Practices from Marketo Champions. Now it’s your turn, download the attached segmentation worksheet created by Marketo Champion, Brooke Bartos, Marketing Automation Manager at Walk Sands Communication, and start improving your segmentation today.

 

Keep an eye out for more tidbits from the new ebook that is launching in early 2019 (check out the excerpt on engagement program management here). Have questions about the content? Let us know in the comments!

**Posting on behalf of Chelsea Kiko Marketing Automation Team Lead at Hileman Group**

 

Reporting in Various Marketo Spaces

I have been building Marketo architecture and planning strategic marketing automation plans for about five years now and I still get the Marketo question about reporting. ‘Is that in Marketing Activities or Analytics section?’ – and there is a lot of confusion about which is better, which holds what type of reporting and what works best for subscriptions.

For me, it really comes down to the question ‘what are you trying to report?’ – if it is instance-wide and holistic reporting, I want to always say head to the analytics section to build those reports. However, there are reasons for usage of both and I will go through that in this blog post.

 

The biggest difference between program-level marketing activities reporting is the level of the reporting you want to accomplish. Analytics section is for that holistic reporting on a large group of assets/activities or even the whole instance. Also, if you want to see more details on ‘who’ not just the numbers, then program level reporting is your best bet as it can dive into the details a little more than analytics reporting can, and also, it makes more sense to build some reports next to the programs so that folder/reporting organization is intact.

 

I am going to talk about key factors and which reporting space would be a better for common situations.

 

Dashboard/Monthly Instance-Wide Reporting

I use analytics reporting for all my high-level reporting for my instance. For example, if I want to see how all my emails are doing YTD – I will use email insights and get that reporting. However, you can change your time period and pick and choose what emails you report on – but, this is a nice view for high level reporting or dashboards.

Image_01_Elevate_Analytics.jpg

 

Speaking of dashboards, depending on what type of tool you use, you may have to have data sources plug in to that external platform. Or, maybe you have a reporting dashboard where you still check out the instance and record it. Either way, it is great to organize reporting for dashboards in the analytics section. This makes it clean, easy to find and doesn’t get cluttered by marketing activities programs that are being deployed.

Image_02_Elevate_Analytics.jpg

 

**Expert Tip** [see below]– one nice feature of analytics reporting is you can actually layer on smart lists to your reporting to add additional detail for a holistic report. The below screenshot shows a lead lifecycle report with additional UTM smart lists so we can see exactly where each lead came from within the lead lifecycle. This is simply done by creating the smart lists and then adding them in within the setup tab of the report. You can also drill down on certain fields or attributes to see more information about the report. For example, say you want to add the custom columns of various UTMs and then drill down the reporting by company name – below is how you’d do that to achieve more data. This cannot be done to this extent in marketing activities.

Image_03_Elevate_Analytics.png

Image_04_Elevate_Analytics.jpg

Image_05_Elevate_Analytics.jpg

 

User & Roles

This is a popular reason to do reporting in analytics (or database) vs program level, marketing activities reporting. Many times, we want to make sure we have our users and roles to the point where it makes sense for the organization. If you tend to have a marketing person go rogue in Marketo when they want to see reporting but then manipulate or change marketing programs, you can lock them down to just see the analytics area of Marketo. Or, another reason for this would be for possibly a role where a team member’s role is to report how the marketing influenced campaigns are helping overall ROI. This way, you can give the user access to analytics, send them the Marketo link and they can export their own data. For example, Matty Marqeto is your analytics manager and he needs to see pre-built reports (or reports he builds on his own) in order to connect his dashboard and complete his role on the team. You can give him access to just the analytics section of Marketo so he can get in, pull the numbers he needs, and then go about his day. You can also do this in the database section of Marketo for smart lists. If you want to build out a smart list of data and don’t want to give the analytics manager or campaign reporter access to marketing activities – you can build the smart list in database and give the user access to database and analytics section only in Marketo. You can even choose if the user can export data or not – which is a nice feature.

Image_07_Elevate_Analytics.jpg

 

Specific Reporting by Campaign

It is best practice to build reports in advance within a program process template so when a new program is created or cloned, you have readily available common reporting within each program. This can help the campaign stakeholders know what reporting is available and be able to easily see the reporting in the program instead of searching in analytics.

Image_08_Elevate_Analytics.png

 

It is nice to have these reports ready because campaign specific reporting should be done at the program level versus in analytics so the organization is consistent and campaign stakeholders know where to find the reporting.

 

Subscriptions

Both the marketing activities reporting and analytics reporting can create subscriptions to be mailed to a user on a predetermined frequency. All you have to do is create the report how you want and then right click and create new subscription. The subscription will live where the report lives, so remember that if you want someone to have access to be able to modify the report. For example, Susan cannot edit her smart list report from her event in analytics section if the report lives in marketing activities.

 

Ad Hoc Reporting & Troubleshooting

Lastly, another common reason why users dive into the marketing activities program reporting versus analytics is for additional reporting and troubleshooting within campaigns. It makes sense to keep everything grouped together. When troubleshooting a potential area within a campaign, many times smart list reporting or even local asset reporting is used to see what an issue could be and how it can be resolved. Building these in the programs is best practice so all of the data is organized within the campaign and doesn’t get lost in another area of the platform like analytics.

 

The same goes for ad hoc reporting. For example, you have a unique campaign that needs some extra reporting for various campaign owners, so building it within the tree organization in the campaign makes sense to all parties. The reports can be easily found and reported on that campaign only.

 

Those are some common reasons to use one section of Marketo over the other and some extra details on why. Reporting with third parties can make these practices change as well as internal team organization.

Custom Forms 2.0 JavaScript behaviors are best managed via an external JS file and <script src="/yourfile.js"> tag in the LP. This allows your code to be updated without touching any other part of the page or form, sharing behaviors across forms & pages, and so on.

 

At tonight's NYC MUG meeting, my man Nick asked if you could put the custom behaviors JS into the form itself via Form Editor.

 

Indeed, if you want a quick-and-dirty JS enhancement, and you don't want to figure out where in the LP to put your <script> tag[1] or talk to your webmaster, yes, it's possible to use the Forms JS API from a Rich Text area. If you insist.

 

That should be good news! The only, let's say, more guarded news is that you have to do it right or can get craaaaazy results.

 

There's one major concern and one minor concern:

 

    (1) Major: You must ensure the code in your embedded <script> only runs once. Because of the curious way in which forms are rendered, this is a harder than you probably think.

    (2) Minor: You have to completely hide the Rich Text area so it doesn't show up in the layout, which means hiding its entire form row (margins, padding, et al.).

 

(2) is easy to accomplish with some CSS. So let's wait on that.

 

Run only once

Let's see what happens if we naïvely add a RT area containing a <script> with a simple whenReady listener function inside. Note I've put some text at the top of the RT so it looks in-use in Form Editor (“[Form Behaviors JS - Do Not Delete]”). Such text is optional but recommended; otherwise, the RT might be accidentally deleted as it looks empty until you double-click it.

 

ss

 

When you load a page with just that one Marketo form in it, you might see the following Console output:

 

ss

 

That's the same function run 4 different times even though we only have one Rich Text. Really bad if you're adding event listeners!

 

This happens because of the way the <form> DOM is built out. As the <script> is ejected and injected into the page repeatedly, it ends up executing its code repeatedly.

 

And that's not the same function running, technically speaking, but 4 functions that happen to have the same code running in a row. Because they're all separate from each other, they don't share a parent scope in which you could add behaviorsLoaded = true or something like that.

 

Instead, you can set an HTML data- attribute on the <form> element, since that will of course persist across executions. Each time the code runs, check for the attribute and return immediately if it's already true:

 

ss

 

In copy-and-pastable form:

 

[Form Behaviors JS - Do Not Delete!]
<script type="application/javascript">
MktoForms2.whenReady(function(form){
  var formEl = form.getFormElem()[0];

  if( formEl.getAttribute("data-inline-behaviors-loaded") == "true" ) {
    return;
  }

  formEl.setAttribute("data-inline-behaviors-loaded", "true");

  // now continue
  console.log("Doing something special");
});
</script>

 

Now you can see the meat of the code only runs once:

 

ss

 

Back to CSS

If you make the Rich Text area the first row in Form Editor, it's easy to select and hide:

 

ss

 

Copypasta:

 

.mktoFormRow:nth-of-type(1) {
    visibility: hidden;
    position : absolute;
}

 

I'd typically recommend a more resilient method of selecting the right row. But that would likely involve loading my FormsPlus::Tag Wrappers helper JS first… problematic if the whole idea is to consolidate the JS all within the form!

 

 


NOTES

[1] As a reminder, when not using the Rich Text method described here, put the behaviors <script> just inside the closing </body> tag on a Marketo LP, or anywhere after the form embed code on a non-Marketo LP.

Featured in the October edition of the Fearless Forum, Amber Hobson of Applied Systems is walking us through her journey of implementing Dynamic Content. In this master class, Amber goes into detail about her team's marketing strategy before rolling out Dynamic Content, lessons learned during implementation, and how it ultimately impacts marketing efficiency and reporting.

 

Q1: Can you describe how you leverage personalization at your organization?

Every single email is personalized to some extent. Our CMO is very much about the right content to the right person. We had implemented specific letterhead, envelopes, etc. throughout the organization to ensure that when you receive something from Applied, the address matches your country’s main location. He wanted us to do this for digital as well. We started with multiple emails for each region to get the right footer address, which later grew into the sophistication that we have today.

 

Q2: What are some specific benefits you’ve seen from implementing personalization?

It saved time for our Demand Gen team significantly! It’s much easier to change words or make minor edits within the Dynamic Content than it is to create multiple emails and set up our smart campaigns to send the right one based on country. Now, we can just build a single email and schedule it in a simple campaign.

 

It also had an unanticipated benefit where it can now flow into our reporting. We can actually do our reporting for email statistics based on the Dynamic Content segments as well. This is huge for our regional teams! It allows us to see how an email performs based on each group. For example, we’ve learned now that shorter emails are perform better North American while longer emails are better received in European.

 

Q3: Can you go into detail about efficiencies?

We work in 4 countries and technically 2 languages. In our industry, there are minor wording changes even between the US and Canada. This means that we were having to build separate emails for just a single word or a CTA link change. At this point building multiple emails for minor nuances was difficult to manage and we would have a single program with at least 5 emails to ensure we were getting the right content to the right person. By implementing Dynamic Content, we were able to scale down to a single email that we segment appropriately to make the necessary regional changes. We always start with the US (our largest market) and then we can quickly run a find/replace for some of the smaller copy changes.

 

Q4: How are you setting up your Dynamic Content campaigns within Marketo?

Our most used campaign is our Geographic segment. We set up a segment to catch country & language for everyone in our database. We’ve had to expand this segment over time as our company has grown by adding other markets. We also switched to using the State/Country picklist functionality in SFDC. One thing you have to remember is that when a change like that is made, you have to update all of your segments. Otherwise you end up with more people in the “Default” category than you want.

Picture1 (1).png

Then we created a Footer & Unsubscribe snippet for our emails as the most basic quick win. This allows us to have unique subscription centers and to include our local addresses in the footer of our emails.

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Then for every email we do, we use that Snippet in our footer section.

Picture5 (1).png

 

Q5: What are some unique ways you’re leveraging Dynamic Content with Marketo?

We have two unique ways that we’re using Dynamic Content. One is geography. All emails automatically have a geographic segment added, even if it is just for the footer & unsubscribe content. The second method that we do is leverage Acuity to manage scripts. We use Acuity to provide each of our sales reps with their own calendar link. Then we create a segment based on SFDC account owner and simply change the URL based on the reps.

Picture6 (1).png

 

Q6: How are you layering features of Marketo to make Dynamic Content work for you by utilizing tokens/buttons?

This one took us a while to figure out! We had been using Dynamic Content for our copy for years before we realized that we could use it for our CTA links as well. We have added Dynamic Content to each of our five program tokens, which we use to populate our CTAs. We standardized our CTA to always include one of these tokens (with a few minor exceptions).

Picture7 (1).png

We also layered Marketo features into our modules when we are working in a newsletter. We have our client newsletter that goes out each month and each module corresponds loosely to a certain product. We segmented each module to have different content based on if you do or do not have that product. It gets crazy when working through QA, but we’ve identified key client accounts that will get specific content sections that we use as our QA people.

Picture8 (1).png

 

Q7: What was the trial and error process like leading up to the current Dynamic Content model you’re using?

It was more just us being paranoid about what we thought might happen versus what is actually likely to happen! We put our marketing team on every email that went out, but since we all have US information, the test results may not always be ideal. We got so many questions from the team asking if it should have said this or if it was correct for the market. I think we finally have them set up to understand it, but it made everyone so nervous!

 

Then, we had to train our communications team how to write the copy so that we were getting all regions at once so we could actually schedule them correctly. The other issue with the geographic segment was that we used to have our French copy translated for a later date, but now we’re providing the copy at the same time as the other regions. It creates a better experience for our client base (especially because a single account may have both French & English filters), but it took some training for our team.

 

Q8: What was the most challenging part of building out your Dynamic Content model?

It took a lot of research to decide how we wanted to start. We knew that building three (at the time) different emails every time that we sent something wasn’t working, but we weren’t sure how to fix it. After digging around on the Marketing Nation Community, talking to other users, and then going through trial/error, we decided that Dynamic Content was the way to go. Building out our segments was very challenging. We found originally that our data wasn’t as clean as sales thought it was, so we had to do a clean up campaign in SFDC and then we set up standardization for country & language across all areas of SFDC as well as within our Marketo forms. We still do periodic audits to ensure the data is correct and have had to expand our standardization to other systems that simply touch SFDC or Marketo (finance system, implementation system, etc.)

 

Q9: What advice would you give to Marketo users who are considering implementing Dynamic Content for localization purposes?

Think through your segments. You have to remember that no person can be a member of two segments so if there is any chance of overlap, you may need to diagram it out. And start small! Pick one type of item to do dynamically. For us, it was geography. As soon as you have that first one worked out, the ideas will just flow and you will find so many uses!

 

We hope you enjoyed reading about how Applied Systems is leveraging Dynamic Content to make the lives of their marketers easier.

In the feedback from our Marketo Fearless Forum: Edition 03 , we received a lot of comments asking for more information on the inaugural members of our Fearless 50. As a result, we have created a new series for our customer newsletter called How 2B Fearless.

 

In this first edition, we sat down with Brooke Bartos, who is not only a Fearless 50 member, but she is also a Marketo Champion and a Chicago MUG Leader. Brooke tells us about what being a fearless marketer means and what that has meant for her career.

 

What does fearless marketing mean to you?

Fearless marketing means knowing the risks and the rewards of trying something new and making an educated decision with full commitment.

Who is a fearless marketer you look up to and why?

When it comes to fearlessness, I have always admired Oprah Winfrey for the brand and the legacy she has created. When you learn about her background, her childhood, and her teenage years, this is someone who had every excuse not to succeed, and yet, she did in the most spectacular of ways. Oprah has become a globally recognized brand in media, literature, and consumer products. She chose to rise above the obstructions life placed in her path.

How did your career start out in marketing?

I went to school for psychology because I was intrigued by the puzzle of what motivates people. My first internship out of college was working in a market research department for a major automotive manufacturer, where I worked on the relaunch of their dealership incentive program. This relaunch was heavily based on feedback gained through interviews, surveys, and focus groups about what motivates them in the sales process. I learned that when it comes to business, there are subtle ways you can influence behavior through how you communicate— words, images, and styling that you use in marketing is all psychology at the core.

 

How did you get to the point you are at in your career today?

I learned a tremendous amount about how to communicate with people through my market research internship and time in field marketing. These experiences helped me learn what motivates people and how to talk to them.

When I went to work for a company where I had my hands in just about every element of our marketing, both  and offline, I was able to bring all that knowledge to helping transform the company from a traditional offline marketing company into one focused primarily on digital marketing. It was not an easy transformation! It took gaining buy-in from areas of the organization that were ingrained in the traditional marketing ideas of print and tradeshows and getting them to try new channels, upgrade strategies, and prove results.

 

That company was where my Marketo journey began. At first, I was a part-time user, “backup trigger” to our admin at the time. When she left, I asked to move into that role, but the response I got from HR was “no.” They wanted to bring in someone with more Marketo experience to manage and grow the instance. I started job hunting—this was something I was strongly interested in, and if that meant that I had to go out to go up, I would.

 

During the process, my boss found out I was interviewing. We were able to sit down and have a candid conversation about what I wanted and what I was looking for. She went to bat for me, and I moved into that admin role two weeks later! Within four months of that move, I became Marketo Certified for the first time. That only served to fuel the fire—I went on to get recertified and obtain all eight of the Specialization Certifications Marketo when they were released. I had something to prove to myself, and to my boss, for taking the chance on me. Early this year, I put myself out there and applied to the Marketo Champions program. In February, I was named to the 2018 Champions class.

 

I eventually ran out of room to grow at that company. From there, I moved to my current role with a full-service digital marketing agency. Every day I get to work with clients on a global enterprise scale to build out and optimize their Marketo instances in support of their overall demand gen and content marketing strategies. I am excited by new opportunities and resources afforded me as a part of an agency and I look at every challenge as a chance to grow.

I would not be where I am without an incredible support network of mentors, cheerleaders, and people who believe in me. I will be forever grateful to have them in my life and as a part of my journey.

What have you learned from other members of the Fearless 50?

This inaugural class of Fearless Marketers comes with such a diverse set of skills and from a broad set of backgrounds, industries, and roles. From them, I’ve learned that fearlessness comes in many forms, some personal and some professional. Commitment to success is at the core of every single one of their stories and is a principal I have really taken to heart.

What are three pieces of advice you would give to the next generation of fearless marketers?

#1. Take calculated risks! If you always play the safe game, you’ll never know what you could truly accomplish. When we try new things in marketing and in life, that hesitant moment of “can I do this?” that comes from self-doubt should not be a question, it should be a commitment. I CAN do this. Lean into that hesitation as a way to grow.

#2. Make smart decisions. When you are ready to commit to an idea, make sure you have gathered as much information as you can to make the most educated decision possible, and commit. Understand the pros and cons and make the best and smartest decision you can.

#3. Learn from failures. Do not berate yourself or others when something goes wrong. You cannot go back and change it. Take it as a lesson. Examine what went wrong and what you can learn from it to do things differently in the future.

 

 

Check out the rest of the content featured in Marketo Fearless Forum: Edition 04.

 

About Brooke Bartos

BrookeBartos-400x400.jpg

 

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brookembartos/

Community Page: Brooke Bartos

 

Have any questions for Brooke about her fearless marketing career? We would love to hear them in the comments below.

At Marketo, we understand that sharing knowledge with your peers is a great way to help accelerate learning. That’s why we partnered with our 2018 Marketo Champions to pull together a new ebook that dives into how you can leverage Marketo like some of our top performers. The new ebook, titled the [Marketo Success] Guide, provides detailed insights on everything from setting up email templates to which reports you should be pulling to prove your impact on revenue. Check out an excerpt from the ebook below written by Erik Heldebro, Chief Marketing Officer at Bambuser and Rachel Noble, Manager Client Services at Digital Pi to learn how they manage engagement program memberships in Marketo.

 

Managing Engagement Programs

Nurture programs aren’t just hard to conceive. They can be hard to manage, too, especially if you don’t have a program set up for just that purpose. We call this a Nurture Traffic Controller, and here’s how to build one:

  1. Create a Default Operational Program named Nurture Traffic Controller.
  2. In the new program, create three folders: Smart Campaigns, Smart Lists, and Reports.
  3. In the Smart Lists folder, create a Smart List named “1. Nurture Target Audience.” The Smart List criteria should include anyone who would potentially qualify for any nurture program. We’ll specify which program later. Remember that Marketo filters out Unsubscribed, Marketing Suspended, and Blacklisted leads automatically.
  4. If you have one Engagement Program that everyone goes into, skip to step 5. Otherwise, you will need to create additional target audience Smart Lists to identify which Engagement Program qualified leads should go into. For example, if you have an Engagement Program specifically for VP’s, create a Smart List “2. VP Target Audience.”
  5. In the Smart Campaigns folder, create a new Smart Campaign named “1. Add Qualified Leads to Nurture.”
    1. Smart List:

         EP_Champion_EBook_Image01.png

    1. Flow:
      1. If you have a generic nurture program, your only Flow step should be: Add to Engagement Program -> Generic Engagement Program, Stream=Stream 1. Add choices to determine which stream if you have multiple streams.
      2. If you do not have a generic nurture program, you can use the Smart Lists you created in step 4 to identify which program they should go into
      3. Add to Engagement Program  If Member of Smart List A, Engagement Program A  Stream = Stream 1 and so on. Like in (i), you can also add choices to determine which stream if any of these programs have multiple streams.

                 EP_Champion_EBook_Image02.png

 

   6. Schedule this to run recurring just before the cast of the nurture program(s). If the casts are not consistent, consider scheduling this daily. Remember that the campaign is set so people can only run through once, so you don’t have to worry about this re-assigning everyone to new nurture programs each time it runs.

   7. If you don’t have any other nurture programs, you’re done! Otherwise, we need to set up transition rules to get people into the correct nurture program. For each additional nurture program, we need to create a new Smart Campaign to transition leads who qualify:

  EP_Champion_EBook_Image03.png

  EP_Champion_EBook_Image04.png

 

And that Smart List referenced in Flow step #1?

EP_Champion_EBook_Image05.png

 

Now your leads will be in the right Engagement Programs!

 

Engagement Program Checklist

When setting up your Engagement Programs, here’s a checklist you can use to make sure you have everything you need.

  • Engagement Program built
  • Content Streams created
  • Unsubscribed/Invalid Stream created
  • Transition Rules defined
  • Smart Campaign to track success at the Engagement Program level built and activated
  • Emails added to nested Default Programs within the Engagement Program
  • Smart Campaigns to track success at nested Default Program level built and activated
  • Excluded Smart Campaigns built-in nested Default Programs and activated
  • Default Programs/Email Assets added to streams
  • Default Programs/Email Assets activated in streams
  • Cadence/first Cast scheduled
  • Traffic Controller created/updated

 

We hope you enjoyed reading this excerpt from the upcoming [Marketo Success] Guide: Best Practices from Marketo Champions. Keep an eye out for more tidbits from the new ebook that is launching in late 2018. Have questions about the content? Let us know in the comments!

Hello Marketing Nation,

 

This week Marketo reopened the gates to the Marketo Champion Program and we wanted to extend the invitation to all of you in the Marketing Nation Community. Many of you have been impacted by a Marketo Champion in one way or another. Whether you've seen some of their content here on Community or you've attended a Champion-lead Marketo User Group, the Champions are deeply devoted to helping our customers win with Marketo. The application will be open until November 30th.

 

For more details around becoming a Marketo Champion, check out the Champion Info page listed here: Requirements & Benefits of the Champion Program

 

If you're ready to apply today, you can find the application here: https://engage.marketo.com/championapplication2019.html

 

If you have any further questions about the Champion Program’s Criteria & Requirements, please email customermarketing@marketo.com

 

Good luck to all the 2019 applicants!

As you dive into the world of webhooks for advanced database tasks, the number of webhook definitions in the Admin UI can get pretty crazy. I've seen instances with 100 different ’hooks!

 

Many webhooks do need to stand alone, but some come in pairs or groups. For example, an Add to Event Registration Counter webhook needs a companion Remove from Registration Counter. A Lookup in Suppression List webhook running against an external db likely means Add to Suppression List is also defined. And so on.

 

To consolidate webhooks and make the UI (and your code) more manageable, a cool trick is to send the {{Campaign.Name}} token along with the hook, so the remote service can decide which direction/action to take, and you only need to define one webhook to cover a group of related actions.

 

For example...

I have a webhook that maintains, in a Textarea custom field, all the Static Lists a lead is currently in. (This view is notoriously hard to get at, in both the UI and the API, unless you flatten it onto a field like this.) The field uses a semicolon-delimited format, as is typical for such things: Apples;Peaches;Pumpkin Pies.[1]

 

Naturally, the webhook is triggered on Added to List and on Removed from List. So I have those 2 campaigns set up with informative names:

 

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And the onRemove flow is exactly the same as the onAdd flow pictured above. They both call the same webhook, rather than there being 2 webhooks, one for each direction.

 

Then within the webhook itself, I can detect the direction because {{Campaign.Name}} is included in the payload (in addition to {{Trigger.Name}}, which is the List name):

 

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This I find infinitely more manageable than the alternative, since the onAdd and onRemove handlers sit right next to each other.

 

Obviously, the exact way your webhook service switches between different directions/modes depends on your architecture. Since this webhook uses JavaScript, there's a literal JS switch statement, while in other cases you might pass {{Campaign.Name}} in the URL path or query string (the dotted Program Name.Campaign Name could represent the dot-path to different Java class methods, that would be cool!).

 

 

Notes

[1] In this case, a single Static List can't have a semicolon within its name, for obvious reasons.  You can switch delimiters as necessary.

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