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2017

I have on occasion seen people use date filters in their segmentation smart lists. This doesn't function the way people think. Relative operators like "In Past" or "In Future" don't get recalculated constantly so people may not switch segments when you want them to.

 

When a segmentation is created using a date filter, it evaluates the people at that moment and segments them based on the current value. The segment the person is in only gets reevaluated when there is a data value change, which does not get registered unless the actual data in the field changes. Relative operations don't register this in the activity log since the actual field value isn't changing.

 

For example, imagine you built a segment with the filter "Created At in Past 30 Days". Every new lead would be put into this segment when they were first created, but they would not be moved out of it on Day 31.

 

Since you should really only be using segmentations when you want to create dynamic content, your best option in this case would probably be to add people to and remove people from static lists with a smart campaign and use the static lists in the segment definition instead, just as suggested when doing this with custom objects.

     This one comes up periodically in the Community, so thought I'd set out the answers for next time.

 

     Thank You (a.k.a. Follow Up/Download) pages shown after a lead converts are public webpages, just like the Landing Pages that host your forms. So occasionally the concern flares up that people will post or forward the Thank You URL, encouraging other leads to bypass the form and go straight to the Download button.

 

Read the full post on TEKNKL :: Blog →

If your Marketo forms are only in English or even if you work in other languages, but the buttons on your forms only use unaccented ASCII characters you'd never see this bug.

 

Still, that leaves at least a few people who might've been bitten by it, right?

 

Read the full post on TEKNKL :: Blog →

When I first started using Marketo as a client, the ability to easily create forms that could capture prospect and customer data and get it directly to my sales team via our CRM was heady stuff. We were suddenly going from a situation where users bounced around our website gathering all of our information while we gathered none from them, to one where we could gate EVERYTHING and ask EVERYTHING.

 

So, naturally, we did.

 

You can guess how that went! At Marketo, we recommend that you be strategic about your content and when you gate it. Top of Funnel (TOFU) content that builds general awareness of your brand and demonstrates your thought leadership/expertise in an area should be open to all potential prospects. In the Middle of the Funnel (MOFU), more useful content that may be proprietary to you (think RFPs, buying guides, calculators, industry reports) should be gated. And finally, at the Bottom of Funnel (BOFU), we recommend opening the content up again - this content (product comparisons, etc.) is generally most valuable to prospects who are already engaged with you and your sales team and is affirming their decisions.

 

But when it's the appropriate time and place to gate content, clients often struggle with how much prospect data to request on the form. I always boil it down to this: What's In It for Me? And I don't just mean me the prospect, but also me the marketer.

 

What's the value for the prospect? This one is fairly obvious, but hard for marketers because we can be pretty biased about the awesomeness of that tool/guide/calculator/report we're offering. Put yourself in the prospect's shoes instead and be brutally honest:

 

  • Can the prospect get this information elsewhere?

  • Are my competitors or anyone else offering something like it (and if so, are they gating it)?

  • Does this content answer a question my prospect needs to help solve their problem?

 

The more exclusive and useful the content is, the greater its value to the prospect and the more likely they are to a) fill out the form in the first place and b) fill in more fields to get it. Even subconsciously, prospects are looking at the form between them and your content and evaluating "do I think this will be worth the time to fill out and/or the release of my personal information to get?" So if the value is lower, per the above, consider either not gating it until you can make that content more valuable OR make sure your form is short and sweet.

 

But also think "What's In It for Me?" as a marketer - what's the utility and value of the data you're requesting on the form? If it's a contact request form, it makes sense to ask for a phone number. But for a buying guide or a report? You don't need that data to deliver the content the prospect is asking for, so why are you asking for it? If this is the first form your currently anonymous prospect is visiting, will they find a "phone number required" field off-putting for a guide? Probably. Do you need to know what their job title / role is in order to provide them the right version of the guide/tool etc.? Definitely ask, but consider explaining to them that's why you're asking. Transparency goes a long way with prospects when asking for data.

 

Now, eventually, as you take your prospect along your customer journey and get them to engage with more and more of your un-gated and then gated content, you will need more and more information from them in order to fully qualify them for your sales team. That's what progressive profiling is for! From form to form, you'll ask them more and more qualifying information and it will a) be easy for them because it's only a couple of questions at a time and b) make sense to them because what your'e asking should also be tracking to their customer journey (region of the world, buying timeframe, buying role, etc.) It won't feel invasive, intrusive or unnecessary to the value of the content you're offering.

Many new customers are confused as to how Marketo’s munchkin code works when it is applied on different, separate domains. They often expect to be able to automatically track behavior on multiple domains just by using the munchkin code and cooking someone once.

 

Unfortunately, (and fortunately) it doesn’t work this way. If you could set a cookie for any domain, well, you could inject your munchkin javascript to any site and set a cookie for any domain. Think of the privacy laws and security havoc this would wreak.

 

Marketo’s munchkin uses what is called first party cookies. Put simply for non-technical folks, this means that each record in your database must be cookied in each domain first before we can track their behavior.  The good news is once a record is cookied in more than one domain all their web activity is combined into the activity log of their record in Marketo.

 

As a reminder, these are the primary out of the box ways a marketer can set cookies on a domain with very little, if any, technical resources involved:

 

  • Marketo Forms – embed Marketo form(s) on the domain so that once someone fills out a form they are cookied
  • Click links in an Marketo email - send an email to your database with links that when clicked will have the record land on a page on the domain where the munchkin code has been applied. When the person clicks the link, they are cookied

 

If you have a technical resource available to you, there are other ways you can set cookies using our APIs and no Marketo forms or emails. While the two methods above require very little technical resources, you do need a lot of creativity in creating your call to actions – which is exactly what marketers do best.

     The Munchkin API function associateLead is magical and underused. It's key to synchronizing certain 3rd-party data with your Marketo database, and bizarrely enough was the first Marketo feature I ever used (well before understanding anything about campaigns and flows!).

 

     I have a post set to publish re: tracking engagement with non-Marketo emails, and since that post concentrates on the browser side (how to use specialized tokens in link URLs to associate leads, even when emails are sent via other ESPs) I decided to dedicate a post to how you generate those tokens.

 

     The info below is a must-read preface to the main post, but it'll also be useful on its own to some readers.

 

 

WHAT'S AN “ASSOCIATOR TOKEN”?

First, I'll tell you what it's not: it's not the Munchkin cookie, it's not the mkt_tok value that's appended to tracked URLs, and it's not a REST API access_token.

 

 

Read the full post on TEKNKL :: Blog →

First, a very big thank you to all of you (569!) who took the time to complete our Help Build the Nation survey in December.

 

Our goal is to ensure the Marketing Nation Community continues to serve your needs as a vibrant place where customers, partners, and employees all come together to share and learn from one another. To do so, we needed to hear from you about what you do in Community and what you don’t, what you want from Community and what you don’t, and what’s important to you and what’s not. You certainly didn’t let us down. I truly appreciate all the feedback. It was incredibly valuable.

 

So, what did you tell us? If I had to sum it all up in a couple of words, I would say overwhelmingly you would like us to improve the search and simplify the site. Got it!

 

There were also other interesting learnings from the survey:

  1. You use Community almost exclusively for product learning—product information, product support, and increasing your Marketo knowledge
  2. You spend the bulk of your time in Community in Product Docs, Support, and Discussions
  3. 64% of you use the global search (magnifying glass) to find what you’re looking for
  4. Your number one motivation for participating in the Community is to increase your Marketo expertise
  5. You want to see more advanced content in Community, in the form of hacks and workarounds, tips and tricks, and best practices

 

What’s next? Now, we take what you told us and start to work on it. Our development team is already working on improving search and I have kicked off a project to simplify the site. As soon as I have timelines for the improvements, I will share them. Stay tuned!

 

If you have any additional ideas or feedback, please feel free to let me know. With your help, I’m excited about making our fabulous Community even better!

This year’s Marketing Nation Summit is just around the corner and we have some exciting news about the conference! Just last week we announced that the theme of the conference is “Leading in the Engagement Economy.” More on the engagement economy in this blog from our CEO, Steve Lucas.

 

We will also be hosting a brand-new experience, a “summit-within-a-summit” in partnership with Adweek focused on the future of advertising technology (AdTech). Marketo and Adweek will present “The Future of AdTech at The Marketing Nation Summit,” a half-day of programming moderated by Adweek Editorial Director James Cooper, where you will hear from some of today’s leading marketers about how they are leveraging the latest technology to rethink how they interact with customers. The names of the speakers included in this program will be announced in the coming weeks.

 

Many sessions, providing the best industry insights to help you succeed in the new Engagement Economy, have already been announced with more to come in the next few weeks:

  • Digital Marketing Transformation in the Age of Cyber Threats: What Every Marketer Should Know – Holly Rollo, chief marketing officer, RSA
  • Fake News, Public Distrust, and the Implications for Marketing – Gerry McGovern, chief executive officer, Customer Carewords
  • Five Ways to Caffeinate Your Customer Experience in 2017 – Scott Anderson, chief marketing officer, Sitecore
  • How the San Francisco Giants Transformed CX to Become Baseball's Brand MVPs – Bryan Srabian, vice president of digital media & brand development, San Francisco Giants
  • The Rise of the “Unbrand”: The Secret Genius of Taylor Swift & How She's Changed Marketing Forever – Martin Kihn, research vice president, Gartner for Marketing Leaders
  • What's Your Story? How Powerful Narratives Drive Great Companies – Deb Lavoy, CEO of Narrative Builders

 

Let’s not forget that Summit is about fun too! In addition to multiple parties and other events, four-time Grammy Award-winning band Train will perform in a private concert for all registered attendees.

 

Don’t miss out! Be sure you’re registered and ready to join us in April at the best Marketing Nation Summit ever!

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