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When done correctly, lead nurturing is a simple method for engaging leads by delivering content to prospects and customers in a way that optimizes engagement and leaves everyone happy. From an operations point of view, “nurture” is defined by a standard set of emails delivered to a lead. Emails are sent regularly and are intended to accelerate brand awareness and engagement. Marketo’s Engagement Programs are designed for this exact purpose.

Before kicking off a new nurture track, it needs to be backed by an engagement strategy. These days, marketing is personalized, and prospects expect everyone to be on the personalization bandwagon. Don’t know where to begin? Start by looking at your buyer journey.

It’s a lot easier than it sounds! Think about buying a car. You’re going along with your daily life and suddenly your transmission blows. Or your best friend rolls into town n a bright, shiny Lexus and you think to yourself, “I’d look pretty good in one of those.” Maybe you see a commercial for the 2019 Jeep Wrangler and the thought of off-roading in the countryside with your pup by your side makes your heart beat just a little faster. This is what’s called the Awareness stage (or in marketing terms, the top of the funnel).

When leads are in the awareness stage, it’s prime time to send them emails with information that makes them think, “yeah, I could use that!” Content in this stage should focus on pain points, brand awareness, and thought leadership. In this phase, potential buyers are just learning about who you are and what you do, and it’s essential to make a good impression.

Next we get to the fun part – the Evaluation stage. They’ve decided they want to buy a car, but now they’re trying to decide which car to buy. Now it’s time to say, “our car is the best car, and here’s why!” Send them stories of other customers who bought cars and loved them. As a follow-up, send a calculator that demonstrates how much money they’ll save in gas if they switch. This phase is grounded in information that makes your product stand out among all of your competitors. Here’s where to send case studies, product overviews, and interactive tools.

Now that they’ve bought in, it’s time to get them to seal the deal. This is the bottom of the funnel – the Decision stage. They’re going to drive to the dealership and test drive the car. They speak to a salesperson who tells them all of the really cool features that make this car unique. But they’re not fully convinced that this investment will pay out. For clients to be happy, sellers need to help them to make the most informed decisions. So here’s where we jump in and help them decide whether the investment is worthwhile. At this stage, content gets more aggressive. Instead of sending “feel-good” messaging, focus on direct CTAs such as “Watch a Live Demo,” “Sign Up for a Free Trial” or “Schedule a Meeting.”

Now it’s up to sales to close the deal, and we can rest assured knowing that we’re leaving our prospects in good hands.

Follow along for more in this series!

When building out various components of a demand generation strategy within Marketo, testing is an area that can often be overlooked. It’s tedious and time-consuming and not always the most exciting task, but the more complex the logic is within a component, the more important testing becomes. Something as simple as a missed flow step or incorrect trigger may have downstream implications that impact the accuracy of your team’s reporting, sales processes, or even external user experience. It’s much easier to catch and fix errors prior to going live than to attempt to trouble-shoot, fix and clean up data within live programming. A solid testing plan will help you do this.

 

What Should I Be Testing?

The answer here is – everything you build. This may include (but is not limited to) lead lifecycle programming, lead scoring, lead nurturing, channel tracking programming, data management programming, email compliance (CASL/GDPR) flows, integrations, and user-facing assets such as emails, landing pages and forms.

 

Testing Best Practices

Creating Scenarios

When you're testing a piece of programming, you'll want to make sure you're testing all possible scenarios that could happen to a record within that flow to ensure nothing is falling through the cracks. The best way to do this is to create a spreadsheet that lists out all of these scenarios, the starting attributes a record should have for each scenario, the test steps or updates you'll need to make to a record to simulate a scenario, and the end result that should happen if everything works properly. Include columns where you list the test record you used for each test, pass/fail, and any notes for failures. Remember to include edge cases, and not just perfect path scenarios.

 

 

Test Record Format

A standard naming convention for your test records is useful for several reasons. First, you'll want to be able to easily differentiate test records from live data if you're doing you're testing in a Marketo production instance rather than a sandbox. Second, for documentation purposes it’s good to have a way to quickly associate a test record with a particular scenario, especially if you're testing complex logic that requires multiple rounds of testing, fixes and re-testing. Our team uses the following standard format for our test records:

 

First Name: [tester first initial][tester last initial][yyyymmdd]-[numerical designation]

Last Name: Test

Email: [tester first initial][tester last initial][yyyymmdd]-[numerical designation]@test.com

Company: Test

 

So, for example:

 

Be sure to take into consideration any required fields as well as starting data attributes that are needed for your scenarios.

 

Testing in Production

Sometimes it will be necessary to test programming in a Marketo production instance rather than a sandbox. When you do this, you'll want to be cognizant of the fact that there may be live data, reporting or routing in place. There are a several measures you can take to mitigate the impact of your testing in a production instance:

  • When you build your Marketo programming in your production instance, add an extra filter to all of your Smart Campaigns so that only records with email addresses ending in @test.com can flow through, ensuring live data does not enter your flows before you're ready.
  • If your programming contains wait steps or time-based actions, reduce these to be a shorter amount of time if needed, to expedite testing.
  • If you are testing programming that lives completely in Marketo and is separate from any programming or processes that live in an integrated CRM, it may be useful to keep your test records within Marketo and not sync them to your CRM, if possible. If you have a centralized Smart Campaign that syncs records to a CRM either at creation or when certain attributes become populated, you could add a filter here for “Email Address NOT contains ‘@test.com’”.
  • If you do need to sync test records over to your CRM, consider suppressing @test.com domains from any lead routing or alerts you have built. If this isn't an option, communicate your testing plan to the users who are at the receiving end of those lead assignments or alerts.
  • Consider adding filters to reports or dashboards that your team leverages, to suppress records with @test.com domains.

 

Documenting Test Results

Documentation is an important part of the testing process. It helps you keep track of your progress, and down the road if something breaks you'll have a documented history of when it was working, which can help with trouble-shooting. As you go through your test scenarios, mark off each pass and fail. For the failures, make note of what went wrong. When you complete your scenarios, go back to the failures and determine what fix is needed, then re-test afterward, indicating the passes and failures for the additional rounds within the same spreadsheet. If you're testing programming that was built by someone else, look for trends around what’s failing to summarize for the builder, to help them identify where an error might have occurred in their programming.

 

Testing Tips for Common Components

Below are some testing tips for common components that you may have built or are planning to incorporate into your Marketo infrastructure.

 

Lead Scoring

When you design and implement lead scoring, it’s a good practice to test out your scoring model itself prior to building it in Marketo. This is particularly important if you have score thresholds aligned to certain stages of your Revenue Cycle Modeler. Run some tests to make sure that if someone does a certain amount of activities, or submits your progressive form a certain number of times, they accumulate enough behavioral points from the activities and demographic points from data entered via form submission to reach the score threshold for the stage you consider them to be in. Check your math. If you document your scoring model in a spreadsheet, you can create Excel formulas to quickly sum up a person’s score when you simulate various activities.

 

Once you finalize your scoring model and build it in Marketo, you'll need to test all of your triggers and flows. Ensure the correct amount of points are being appended to your demographic, behavioral, and total lead score fields as defined in your scoring model. If you're building multiple scoring models, ensure the correct score fields are leveraged throughout each build.

 

Revenue Cycle Modeler

Before you build your RCM, it’s a good practice (and not just for testing purposes) to document the criteria a record must possess to move into each stage – scoring thresholds and any field attributes. When you're creating your RCM test scenarios you can use this as a guideline. You should test every trigger and flow step within each Smart Campaign that is leveraged in your RCM logic. Consider any skip or turn-back logic you have incorporated, where a person can move from one stage to a non-subsequent stage. If your RCM listens for contacts to be added to opportunity records in your CRM, then you'll want to simulate this behavior within your CRM (if you're testing an RCM in a Marketo production instance, be aware of implications this will have in your CRM production instance). Testing an RCM is often more time-consuming than building it.

 

 

Channel Tracking Programs

It’s likely that your team is leveraging Marketo Programs, channels and triggered Smart Campaigns in some capacity to capture content interactions across various engagement channels. A common approach to this also involves a URL querystring strategy so that a single landing page can be promoted across channels. Anytime you build a new tracking program it’s best to visit the corresponding URL with querystring, submit the form, and ensure the correct Smart Campaigns are triggering, and appropriate actions are then taken to the newly created record (depending on your architecture this may be data value updates, a confirmation email, and/or a Marketo Program status update).

 

 

One-off Batch Email Sends

Run a test record through each Smart Campaign used within your Marketo Program. Ensure Marketo Program Status updates, wait steps and re-sends are all happening as intended. If you're using filter logic, run some checks to ensure there are no errors here. Before you schedule your batch campaign make sure that the number of people expected to run through the Smart Campaign is in line with what you'd expect, and ensure your Smart Campaign settings are correct.

 

 

Automated Outbound Nurture

Whether you're leveraging Marketo Engagement Programs to house your nurture logic, or building “from scratch” with traffic cops, watchdogs, and wait steps, you should be sure to test all logic that moves people into, out of, and within your nurture program. Ensure that only the people you want nurtured are able to flow in, and make sure that if a person’s data profile changes then they are moved to the correct new spot within the nurture program, or out of nurture completely. Furthermore, ensure that the correct emails are being sent at the correct points in time, and that interactions with the promoted content in those emails are accurately tracked. You'll also want to test the emails themselves – send tests to designated people on your team to ensure links are correct, and everything renders appropriately.

Just when you thought the topic of GDPR might settle down, it’s still hot news. A little more than a month after the enforcement date, big names are reported for compliance violations, major US publishers block European visitors, and data privacy measures get a little closer to home.

Forced Consent Complaints

It wasn’t much past midnight on GDPR’s official enforcement date when the first complaints were filed. Apparently, tech giants make for easy targets with a slew of complaints filed against Google and Facebook, claiming forced consent. In other words, both platforms require users to give “all or nothing” consent in order to use their respective software vs. parsing data consent areas and allowing users to provide individual consent for each use. Similar complaints have since been filed against Apple, Amazon and LinkedIn. Are the violations legitimate? All are still pending; no resolution or fines have been assessed.

Blocked Media Sites

Some major US publishers have taken a different route to GDPR compliance by blocking EU visitors entirely. The Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune are two of the bigger media companies blocking EU visitors due to non-compliance of ad targeting practices. Other publishers, including USA Today, are displaying non-targeted ads while Meredith and The Washington Post have started asking permission to new site terms to view their sites, including an upsell ad-free option. Publishers—particularly The Los Angeles Times—need to get this figured out as the data privacy landscape is about to get even more complicated.

The Golden State Adopts GDPR-Like Legislation

Barely one month after GDPR went into effect, California Governor Jerry Brown signed The California Consumer Privacy Act, aimed at protecting the data privacy rights of California residents. Much like GDPR, California’s act seeks to give consumers more control over personal data usage, including the right to know how data will be used, what data is being collected and sold, and the right for complete data deletion. The bill, still in early stages, will likely be amended before the enforcement date of January 1, 2020. And if you think this is just hype or California making noise, keep in mind California was the initiator of anti-spam email statutes, later to be replaced by the federal legislation we now know as the CAN-SPAM Act. Privacy legislation is coming to United States—be prepared!

GDPR—Still on the Radar

In just the first month of enforcement, we’ve seen complaints filed, organizations suspending service to Europeans, and copy-cat legislation emerge. The bottom line in all of this is, best data practices need to be our baseline standard. GDPR’s enforcement date is just the beginning; taking proactive measures now will ensure you’re prepared for new legislation, without interruption to your business operations. Recommended reading:

 

How to Avoid a €20 Mistake with your Data: Tips for ensuring your database is clean, junk records removed, and country data normalized.

 

Requirements for Consent – What You Need to Know: Understand what GDPR requires for consent plus how it compares to CASL requirements.

 

And of course, leave your comments below and together, we’ll support each other through another round of compliance preparations.

 

 

As originally published on the Perkuto blog.

Sometimes I think asking, “Which attribution model do you prefer and why?” would be a great (marketing) conversation starter. From single-touch to complex regression-based analysis, some marketers are passionate about a particular method while others are still contemplating which is the best option. The topic sparks an interesting discussion.

 

Of course, all models are simplified approximations of an infinitely complex reality, and, no attribution model is perfect. Attribution models attempt to estimate the influence of your various marketing campaigns on human behavior that is unpredictable, irrational and fluid in nature. There’s no way of actually knowing that your white paper or webinar was responsible for 33% of the purchasing decision and therefore should receive a third of the credit. But, even with the flaws of attribution, applying the appropriate model, understanding the data it’s generating, and applying the directional insights will help you make better marketing decisions.

 

In this post, we’ll explore the different models and why you might use each one.

 

Getting Started with Attribution

 

Before settling in on a particular attribution model, assessing your needs and being realistic about what you want to accomplish will assist in your model decision.

 

  • What questions are you trying to answer? Contribution to revenue, pipeline value, understanding your sales cycle from the first touch to deal closed, which efforts are most impactful, why leads aren’t converting to sales—what do you need answered to sharpen your marketing plan and align reporting with your organization’s objectives?
  • Is your sales cycle simple or complex? Do you have a lot of marketing efforts or only a few?
  • What’s attainable for your organization? Do you have the appropriate tools in place? Are you just starting with attribution or are you more experienced?

 

Once you know what you want to achieve, then you can select a model that’s appropriate for you. (And I should note, unless otherwise stated below, all models discussed are as defined within Bizible’s platform.)

 

First-Touch Model

 

Stemming from the philosophy that a sale cannot happen if a customer doesn’t know you exist, a first-touch model applies 100% of attribution credit to the first tracked marketing interaction, which may occur before the person even enters your marketing database. The model itself is simple, and data analysis is less complicated. In a simple sales cycle with a quick or transactional sale, it’s very easy to see marketing effectiveness and contribution to revenue. The challenge with a first-touch model is data collection, because you need a way to capture and store the anonymous first touch and then associate it with the person when they eventually enter your lead database. You can solve for this challenge with custom tracking script and Bizible tracks this out of the box.

 

In more complex sales cycles, first-touch attribution acknowledges the brand awareness stage, highlighting which of your early marketing efforts were most successful at attracting new customers to your product or service. If you seek to gain insight into top-of-funnel activity, then a first-touch model can be useful in providing answers. If you want to know marketing influence in later stages of your sales cycle, a first-touch model falls short as it only tells part of the story by overvaluing early-stage efforts and ignoring subsequent campaigns.

 

Lead Creation Model

 

Going beyond brand awareness, a lead creation model attributes 100% credit at the point a customer is interested enough to provide contact information and essentially, becomes a “lead.” For example, if a customer visits your website three times and on the fourth occasion, completes a form for more information, the marketing effort that drove the fourth visit would receive 100% of revenue credit. The philosophy here is the campaign that converted a prospect to a lead is the most significant. Many organizations often start with a lead creation model because it provides an excellent introduction to attribution and the set-up is relatively straightforward.

 

Like first-touch, this single touch, simple model does not provide a good representation of longer and more complex sales cycles; for that, you need a multi-touch model.

 

Evenly-Split/Linear Model

 

A Linear or Evenly-Split model gives equal weight to every touchpoint with the rationale that every marketing effort is essential to moving a prospect through the sales pipeline. The challenge with this model is it oversimplifies the marketing process and fails to take into account the context of when the interaction occurred when giving credit.

 

For example, let’s say a person enters your database, consumes a few blog posts and then - a few months later - attends a VIP dinner and soon after is added to a new opportunity. With an evenly-split model, the casual content consumption that did not occur in proximity to any meaningful funnel event would get the same amount of credit as the high-touch dinner that likely made a much bigger impact on the sale. If you relied on this model exclusively, you might easily draw some inaccurate conclusions about relative channel importance.

 

Nevertheless, a Linear model can still provide some insight into which marketing programs are impactful. If you are tracking attribution using Marketo and Revenue Explorer, this is the only multi-touch option available.

 

U-Shaped Model

 

U-Shape is a simple multi-touch model that distributes credit between the early-stage touches to provide a more balanced view of which channels are generating new names in your database. In this multi-touch model, 50% of the weight is assigned to the  first touch and 50% to the lead creation touch. The philosophy behind it is to emphasize lead generation while also sharing credit between the various touches required to grow your database. For this reason, I prefer it over either a First-Touch or Lead Creation single-touch model for evaluating lead generation activities.

 

W-Shaped Model

 

W-Shaped Model

 

A W-shaped model is very similar to a U-shaped model except it acknowledges a third milestone, opportunity creation. Each primary stage of the sales cycle, first touch, lead creation and opportunity creation, is attributed with 30% of revenue and the remaining 10% is split between the other touchpoints. A W-shaped model is one of the most popular attribution models as it gives marketers a well-rounded view of the marketing campaigns leading up to the opportunity creation stage.

 

What’s missing in a W-Shaped model is insight into any activities that occur after the opportunity is created. For example, let’s say you organize a special event for customers and later stage prospects and then several opportunities close soon after. With a W-Shaped model, the significant investment in this event wouldn’t receive any credit.

 

Full-Path Model

 

Full Path Model

 

Similar to the W-shaped model, a full-path model also acknowledges major milestones in the sales cycle, now extending all the way through the revenue stage. Each significant stage receives 22.5% of the credit with the remaining 10% spread across touchpoints in between.  The Full-Path model is obviously more complete than the W-Shaped model and is arguably more sensibly-weighted than an evenly-split / linear model, as the touchpoints that occurred in nearest proximity to important funnel events get a much higher percentage of credit. This can produce reports that better reflect the “actual” impact of these important activities while still giving credit to everything.  For businesses with a complex sales cycle who want full visibility, a Full-Path model is a smart choice and remains easy and simple to implement.

 

Custom Model

 

A more advanced multi-touch option within Bizible is the Custom model.  With this model, you can define custom stages in the sales cycle in addition to those included in the Full-Path model—a common one to add is an “MQL” stage. You can then define your own percentage weightings for each stage based on your unique business model. Notice in this example, that the product demo stage is now receiving 10% credit, demonstrating the perceived significance of this event in the sales cycle.

 

This model offers more flexibility and requires some extra configuration. Its relative freedom also brings a certain level of risk, as the marketer might have inaccurate assumptions about the relative weightings that the different stages should receive and thereby create misleading distortions in the model.

 

Companies may want to run a Full-Path model first, then as knowledge of their unique sales process deepens, transition to a Custom model to achieve a more tailored approach.

 

Custom model

 

Machine-Learning Model

 

This model uses the same stages as the Custom model, but in this case, the machine makes recommendations for weighting credit between the various stages, representing the relative importance to winning a deal based on three criteria:

 

  • Predictiveness: the correlation between stage progression and whether the deal will close
  • Ease/Difficulty: high conversion rate implies less importance in the customer journey
  • Uniqueness: if a touchpoint is shared with multiple stages, the credit is shared, too

 

The algorithm is not random—Bizible based it on millions of touchpoints and buyer journeys. You can use the insights from the Machine-Learning model to refine and alter your Custom model, ultimately producing a machine-learning influenced model that incorporates human insights specific to your organization.

 

Tactic-Weighted Model

 

In a Tactic-Weighted model, credit is allocated based on the importance of the specific marketing tactics involved. For example, attending a webinar may get more credit than downloading an e-book, and attending a prospect VIP dinner may get even more.

 

This type of model—or one that blends it with a position-based model defined above—makes a lot of sense to many marketers, who intuitively know that spending four hours at a high-touch event naturally carries more weight than casually perusing web content.

 

This is an advanced model that is not available out of the box in any platform I’m aware of, but is something an analytically-mature organization could engineer within a BI tool.

 

That’s a Lot of Models!

 

One of the nice things about Marketo’s acquisition of Bizible, is marketers now have more model options to choose from, single-touch to multi-touch, simple to complex. To some, the options may seem overwhelming. My advice: take an inventory of your needs and start with what’s attainable. Remember, you can always transition to a new model as your knowledge and understanding grows. No model is perfect, but attribution will help you gain insight into your customer journey and the relative influence of your marketing efforts.

 

In my next post, I’ll address how to leverage your attribution data to fine-tune your marketing strategy.

 

Want a deeper dive?

 

I'll be presenting a webinar, Bizible Essentials for Marketo Users on July 10 at 1:00 ET . We’ll explore the differences between Revenue Explorer and Bizible, the solutions Bizible offers and the impact on your daily operations. Reserve your seat here.http://bit.ly/2KRmXBF

 

And to go completely meta, here's a Bizible report showing the registrations by channel for the Bizible webinar so far. This offer-by-channel report is really easy to produce in Bizible, and I'll describe how at the webinar.

 

Bizible_Webinar_Reg_by_Channel___Salesforce_-_Enterprise_Edition.png

Now that GDPR is in full swing and hopefully most people have recovered from the May 25th Day of reckoning, I had a lot of questions about GDPR.  So far, I’ve been sat on the outside of the whole GDPR issue and I was interested to learn more.  I've read so many blog posts, watch videos, looked at infographics etc. etc. etc. but even with all the information that is out there I still had questions, and now that GDPR is in full flow I thought now would be a good time to see how everyone has dealt with it, or what they're still dealing with and what we think is going to happen next.  The discussion starts from the very basics up to how it should be dealt with in Marketo and what responsibilities MOPS have.  On the chat we had Joe Reitz, Jenn DiMaria, Sydney Mulligan, Digital Pi, Geoff Krajeski, Enrico de Leon, Jr.

 

Below are the questions I asked:

  1. What exactly is GDPR and how does it affect the use of Marketo?
  2. If a company doesn’t operate in the EU do they still have to be GDPR Compliant?
  3. Is it the MOPs team responsibility?
  4. Any quick tips?
  5. I’ve seen more and more GDPR emails coming through, how much will this affect people's databases as I imagine lots of people won’t ‘opt-in’.  What’s the expected response rate?

 

So take a look and see what you think, I learnt a lot in 30mins, more than I've probably learnt over the past few months.

If you have anymore GDPR questions, feel free to ask and I'm sure someone will be able to help, I might even be able to help a little now!

 

#KreweChats Episode 14: GDPR - A Recap - YouTube

 

I've also got links to lots of other documents/videos/presentations/blogs etc, so if anyone wants those I'm more than happy to share below.

Attribution tools are to a marketer what a compass is to a hiker—both provide direction in your journey and guide your next steps. We’re familiar with current Marketo compasses but now Marketo has embedded a new GPS: Bizible. How does Bizible compare to the Marketo compass you’re currently using, and more importantly, how will it impact your daily operations?

 

Attribution Review

 

If you’re accustomed to tracking attribution using Marketo and Revenue Explorer, Bizible represents a significant change. In my last post, I covered the primary functions of attribution tools: capturing data, modeling data and reporting on that data. In this post, I’ll focus on each function, to illustrate the variances of the tools as well as provide common applications to emphasize the impact on your operations.

 

Data Capture

 

The scenario: You want to track what marketing initiatives are bringing people into your database (ie, “Lead Source”).

 

The process with Marketo: Most marketers can track an offer (ex: a content asset) in Marketo fairly easily using a combination of the form and/or landing page. However, tracking a channel is much harder, especially when it involves digital channels.

To obtain channel information in Marketo you’ll need to use UTM parameters on your landing page along with web referrer data to deduce organic channels. For example:

 

  • utm_medium = paid-social: channel = paid social
  • Web referrer contains “google.com” and no UTM parameters: channel = organic search

 

Of course, you also need to ensure all links are tagged correctly.

 

Next, you need to get that data into Marketo. You might be asking, what about using hidden form fields to capture these parameters? Certainly possible, but what if people don’t fill out a form on the first page they visit?

 

To solve, you’ll have to implement your own tracking script to capture the data, convert it to cookies that persist as the visitor jumps from page to page, ensure all forms have hidden fields to capture UTM and referrer values and finally, pass these values to fields on the person object, which can then trigger adding the person to an appropriate tracking program. Moreover, scripts must be flawlessly written, to avoid failure in certain browsers or Marketo logic fails. Many marketing organizations use these methods very successfully, but there is, never-the-less, complexity and potential for error with this approach.

 

The process with Bizible: There is little configuration to start capturing data with Bizible. Since Bizible has its own tracking script, tracking is simplified, especially for digital activity.

 

What’s happening behind the scenes: when someone fills out a form, Bizible detects and logs the URL of the form completion page from which you would deduce the offer. Where Bizible excels is in tracking channels. Bizible automatically detects and stores the UTMs and web referrer data associated with the session, without having to set custom cookies or modify your forms. Finally, because Bizible has direct API connections with ad platforms like Adwords, Bing, and Facebook ads, it automatically pulls ad and cost detail from these platforms, without any manual tagging required on your part.

 

A Functional Comparison:

 

MARKETO

BIZIBLE

OVERALL

Munchkin tracking script captures web activity. Marketo also logs form fills and email interactions. Referrer/UTM data stored but only in activity log. Custom script required to make this data accessible at the field level.

Bizible tracking script tracks web activity and form fills as well as referrer and UTM data, which is associated with touchpoints for easy reporting. Tracks full clickstream data via Bizible Data Warehouse product, giving it the detail of a full-featured web analytics solution.

OFFERS

Easy to track; typically uses a combination of a form plus landing page to identify offer, which can trigger the addition of a person to the corresponding program.

Detects and logs the URL of the form completed; offer is deduced based on URL.

CHANNELS

Harder to track, especially digital; requires custom script to convert UTM/referrer data to cookies and form management to ensure data is mapped to fields on the person record in Marketo.

Automatically detects and stores UTM parameters and web referrer data, without creating custom cookies or modifying forms. Direct API connections with ad platforms capture ad and cost data without manual tagging. Platforms currently supported: Adwords, Bing, Facebook Ads.

 

Data Modelling

 

The scenario: You’re launching a multi-faceted marketing campaign consisting of many offers (blog posts, webinars, ebooks, etc.) across numerous channels and your boss requires a report showing which channels are driving the most engagement with particular offers. In your preparations, you must also plan for the “human factor”— people who interact multiple times with a single channel.

 

The process with Marketo: Your set-up revolves around Marketo’s unit of attribution, the program, which represents a single marketing initiative you want to track. You can create as many programs as you like, and stages indicate the level of interaction with each program and if that interaction was successful. Programs correspond to a Salesforce campaign (if you track this in Salesforce). How do you capture the relationship between offers and channels?

 

Your options are less than ideal:

 

  1. Create separate programs for offers and channels: This allows you to capture each marketing asset and traffic source the person engages with, but there is no connection between them. Also, if someone engages with the same channel (e.g., organic Twitter) twice, you can’t track the second interaction, because a person can only be a member of a program once.

  2. Create a program for every offer + channel combo. Ex: ABC Ebook + social; ABC Ebook + paid search…and the list goes on. Prepare yourself for a mountain of work and huge task list to maintain.

    programs set up to track offer + channel data

  3. Copy UTM values to the campaign member, which also moves reporting to Salesforce (as you cannot store this additional metadata related to a specific program status in Marketo). This option gives you a more flexible model but requires extra configuration and custom code in Salesforce. Additionally, there are some challenges to tracking costs for ROI and reporting by channels with this method, as you no longer have a distinct campaign to represent the channel.

campaign member example

 

The process with Bizible: Bizible uses “touchpoints” (or the marketing interaction between a person, offer, and channel) as the unit of attribution and captures every web visit, form fill, and offline touchpoint, grouping them into channels or subchannels that you create. Theoretically, unlimited touchpoints are possible.

 

The process is straightforward as Bizible creates touchpoints automatically with little to set-up or maintain. Also nice, all interaction data, both offer and channel, are stored on the same record. As a result, there is greater flexibility in reporting options, including changing channel groupings midstream and reprocessing of all data without information loss.

 

The downside? You’ll have less rich metadata about offers, because the form URL isn’t as precise as the metadata associated with Marketo programs. For this reason, I recommend that you maintain offer programs in tandem in Marketo, which you would likely need anyway to send fulfillment emails, etc.

 

Bizible Touchpoint Example

 

A Functional Comparison:

 

MARKETO

BIZIBLE

UNIT OF ATTRIBUTION

Unit of attribution is the program, a single marketing initiative which corresponds conceptually to a Salesforce Campaign.

Unit of attribution is the Touchpoint, a single marketing interaction between a person, an offer, and channel, stored in a single record.

DATA MODEL

One person can be a member of many programs, but only once per program or campaign. Stages indicate the level of interaction with the program and whether that interaction was successful. Program structure can be as granular as you want, but this becomes hard to manage when tracking offer + channel combinations.

Touchpoints are unlimited; touchpoints are captured for every web visit and logged in CRM for a person’s first anonymous visit, every subsequent form fill, and for offline touchpoints when synced from a campaign, even when repeat interactions with the same offer and channel occur. Channels are assigned to touchpoints dynamically based on business rules, eliminating the need to maintain a set of pre-existing campaigns for tracking purposes.

METADATA

A program can have various types of metadata to add additional dimensions, ex: region, product line, type of marketing initiative, etc. but program tags are limited to a fixed set of values, limiting their usefulness.

Touchpoint data is set based on UTM parameters, providing more flexibility to describe channels according to your prefered taxonomy. Channel and subchannels group touchpoints according to your configuration, which can be altered and data reprocessed. Metadata about offers is limited, as only the form URL is captured.

 

Data Reporting and Visualization

 

The scenario: You’ve completed your marketing campaign, and now it’s time for the fun part— reporting on the results. Your CMO is excited to see how each effort performed and eager to know which was the most profitable...

 

See how Data Visualization and Reporting compare on Perkuto’s website.

Note: Kudos to those who have reviewed and given me feedback on this list! Juli James Jenn DiMaria Christina Zuniga

 

Overview

The job of a Marketo administrator can be difficult to define. What are the primary responsibilities? What role should you play? Who should you work with?

Depending on the size of the company, the charter will vary based on the number of users, resources, and volume of campaigns and content. In a smaller organization, the Marketo admin may perform all of the responsibilities described in this post, while in larger organizations he/she will oversee and delegate responsibilities to individuals or teams. The following will cover the core areas that the Marketo admin should focus on to be effective.

 

Sync with CRM

The Marketo admin works alongside sales operations to ensure marketing and sales data are syncing between Marketo and the CRM.  This includes determining field mapping (which fields in Marketo sync to which fields in the CRM) and ensuring the right fields are being synced to support campaigns and reporting.  Here is the section of the product docs that covers SFDC Sync and Microsoft Dynamics Sync.

 

Check out:

Top 5 Marketo Fields and Enterprise Needs in CRM too
Marketo University Video: Syncing Marketo to Salesforce
Instructions for Creating a Custom Sync Rule

Resources for Learning About Marketo-Salesforce Sync

 

 

Email Deliverability

It is important that the Marketo admin oversees and/or delegates the responsibility of making sure emails are being delivered reliably. This includes incorporating SPF (Sender Policy Framework) and DKIM (Domain Keys Identified Mail) into your DNS settings (this is the “official” way of letting recipients know Marketo is authorized to send emails on your behalf). In addition, it includes setting up processes to ensure invalid emails are cleansed from the system and suppressed in email sends. You should consider using email deliverability tools such as Marketo’s deliverability tool (250ok), Litmus, and/or Email on Acid. These tools come at additional cost. Here is an example of an email Litmus test, which shows how your email is rendered on different email clients, devices and browsers.

 

Check out:
Setup SPF and DKIM in Product Docs
Blog Post: How to Manage Your Marketo Database for Deliverability

Blog Post: Boost Your Deliverability with DMARC - By Courtney Grimes

 

Lead Management

The healthy management of leads is a critical component to marketing automation and business success. This includes how leads are created, tagged, appended/categorized, where they are routed, and who takes action. The Marketo administrator will be instrumental in planning and designing the lead management flow, be responsible for operationalizing it within Marketo and the CRM, and fine-tuning the process over time.

 

Two important components of lead management are lead scoring and lead nurturing. Lead scoring is the assigning of points to leads based on activity, demographic/firmographic attributes, and other characteristics, in order to help prioritize leads for sales. The Marketo administrator should spearhead the process of developing the lead scoring model and operationalizing and maintaining the model.

 

Lead nurturing is the engagement of leads through educational marketing programs that span email, web, events and sales activities to drive the leads to a sales-ready state.

 

Check Out:
Marketo’s Definition of Lead Management
The Definitive Guide to Lead Scoring
Video: How to Set Up a Scalable Scoring Program
The Definitive Guide to Lead Nurturing
Marketo University: Creating and Running Lead Nurturing Programs

 

Lead Lifecycle and Revenue Cycle Model

A key component of lead management that deserves its own section is the lead lifecycle. This is one of the pillars of revenue marketing, and refers to the process in which a lead enters the sales cycle and CRM, and how it progresses into a closed deal.

 

The Marketo administrator plays a key role in architecting this process and working with sales and marketing management to define each stage. While the concept of the lead lifecycle will apply across most organizations, Marketo’s proprietary “Revenue Cycle Model” helps marketers define how leads move in and out of stages as it pertains to the marketing system.

 

Check Out:

KreweChats Discussion on Lead Lifecycle and Revenue Cycle Model
Marketo University: Building a Lifecycle Program

 

Database Management and Data Governance

In tandem with sales operations and IT, the Marketo administrator is responsible for developing and implementing strategies and processes to ensure that accurate and complete data enter the marketing database(s). Data should be verified, enriched and/or appended to support ongoing campaign and reporting initiatives.

 

To be more specific, this includes any or all of the following: deduplication, contact data verification, list import standardization, categorization (demographic/firmographic information such as title and industry), and data cleansing.

Here’s a great resource on overall data hygiene from a past Marketo Summit.

 

Also Check Out:
Marketo University: Maintaining a Healthy Database
Blog Post: Deduplication: How it Works, and When It Doesn't
Blog Post: 6 Steps to Delete Bad Data - By Jeff Coveney

 

Reporting and Analytics

While reporting and analytics may be the focus of a specific person or team, the Marketo administrator is responsible for building processes and/or integrations to get the right data into the right reporting hands. This includes building and executing a plan for tagging and categorizing marketing efforts (such as campaigns). In addition, it’s important to establish an agreed upon timeframe (this may be periodically such as on a quarterly basis, or even in real time) and data format for the reporting handover.

 

Check Out:
Analytics that Matter: Recorded Session by Jessica Kao
The Definitive Guide to Marketing Analytics
Marketo University: Standard Reports in Marketo

 

User Management, Training, and Process Documentation

A critical piece in larger organizations, the Marketo admin needs to manage roles and permissions for all Marketo users and develop training and onboarding programs. Training programs should teach users how to use Marketo and ensure governance in campaign management, data management, and reporting best practices. This includes instance documentation (reference materials and guides on how the Marketo instance is structured), glossary of terms, and step-by-step guides, checklists, and videos.

 

Check out:
Product Doc: Managing User Roles and Permissions
Marketo Fu by Joe Reitz on Youtube

Blog Post: User Roles for Large Marketo Databases - By Rob Barret

 

Martech (Marketing Technology) Strategy

With the marketing automation platform being the system of record for most revenue marketing organizations, it’s important to have a plan for success with each additional piece of marketing technology that gets added to the tech stack. This includes determining how new technology integrates with Marketo, what data needs to be passed between the systems, proper lead source and campaign attribution, and regularly reviewing martech reports such as adoption, ROI, and competitive review.

 

Check out:

5 Steps to Master Your MarTech Stack by Christina Zuniga (her presentation starts on slide 27)

Blog Post: Working with Martech Vendors - Stop Doing it Wrong - By Josh Hill

 

I hope you have found this list useful. Have anything to add? Please leave your thoughts in the comments!

If there’s one area marketers get hung up on more often than not, it’s reporting and attribution.

 

Technology is an important part of the solution. But even with the right tools at hand, attribution efforts can fail for many reasons - poor/inconsistent implementation, lack of process, dirty data, and the list goes on.

 

Marketo recently acquired  Bizible, a leading marketing analytics and performance management software (see here for a recap of that), which fills a major gap in Marketo’s functionality. Bizible delivers robust and easy-to-use marketing attribution capabilities and I suspect will ultimately replace Marketo's RCE product (which is showing its age).

 

In a subsequent post, I’ll cover the unique features of Bizible, seen from a Marketo-centric perspective; but to lay some groundwork, let’s first define what exactly “attribution” is and how it works, because this term is often (mis)used in a confusing variety of ways.

 

Understanding Marketing Attribution

 

Simply stated, marketing attribution is the process of determining which of your marketing efforts is driving the outcomes you want, like revenue. As a byproduct, attribution tools also enable you to optimize marketing campaigns, resource allocations, and your marketing budget. How do they work?

 

Technology aside, all attribution systems essentially examine the intersection of three related datasets:

  1. Marketing Efforts: all the fantastic marketing campaigns you launched
  2. Audience Engagement: the people (prospects, customers, etc.) who engaged with your efforts
  3. Performance Outcomes: the results of your efforts. Usually, this is revenue or pipeline value but could also be a metric like MQLs.

Marketing Efforts, Performance Outcomes, and Audience Engagement

When people engage with your marketing efforts then take the desired action, such as buying your product, we attribute some of that credit back to the marketing effort with which they interacted. The attribution methodology can be simple or tremendously complex, but all are based on this underlying theme.

 

Understanding Attribution Tools

 

In order for attribution tools to tie the three datasets together in a meaningful way, three primary functions must take place:

  1. Capture data
  2. Model data
  3. Visualize and report on data

To expand further:

 

Data Capture

Behind the scenes, your marketing attribution tool is tracking your efforts, engagement and outcomes. Marketing efforts and outcomes are fairly easy to keep an eye on since they are commonly recorded in your marketing automation and CRM systems (e.g., programs and opportunities). Engagement tracking, however, is another story and is where many marketing departments have gaps. The biggest challenge? Marketers need to worry about tracking both channels and offers. To clarify our terms:

 

Channels are the marketing tactics that drive engagement: paid search campaigns, SEO, paid and organic social, trade show booths—you get the idea.

Offers are what people engage with: ebooks, white papers, videos, web forms, webinars—and the list goes on.

 

(These definitions are indebted to Josh Hill, who provides further insights into channels and offers in this post.)

 

Most companies do fairly well with tracking offers but stumble with tracking channels, and that’s not surprising. Tracking channels is significantly more difficult as it typically requires tagging your digital activities with UTM parameters, translating those parameters from website visits into cookies, and then incorporating that data into your marketing automation and CRM systems.

 

Even with Marketo, this process requires a fair amount of setup and skill and typically requires a skilled web developer. And unfortunately, many teams who try to track channels usually fall short—either the required configuration is not done effectively or it’s not done at all.

 

Data Modelling

OK—data captured...check. Now your attribution tool has to store your data in a way that allows for meaningful reporting. For marketing engagement, the simplest way to accomplish this is by adding fields to the person object in order to capture the data you want to report on—lead source is a prime example. The challenge, of course, is this is a “flat” data model, making it very difficult to capture and report on multiple interactions (and multiple dimensions of those interactions) with any sort of flexibility—the data model is simply too limited.

 

Let’s step our model up a notch—you could use another object to represent each of your marketing efforts and then connect people to that object when they engage with your marketing.

 

This is what the Marketo program (or Salesforce campaign) represents: a person is connected to the marketing initiative via a junction object. (ex: campaign member status or Marketo program status). This extension of the data model opens the door to true multi-touch attribution reporting, because you can now reflect multiple people, engaging with multiple marketing efforts, resulting in multiple outcomes. 

 

And while this model is quite flexible, it does have its limitations—for example, a person can only be added to a program once, but what if someone engages with the same channel multiple times? We'll address some of these limitations (and how to circumvent them) in another post.

 

 

Visualizing and Reporting on Data

An example data flow for capturing, modelling, and reporting on data in Marketo. This program structure is relatively simple but suffers from some of the limitations described above. 

 

Visualizing and Reporting on Data

 

Now we get to the fun part: the final step in the attribution process is to visualize and report on your results. This involves calculating credit for your performance outcomes (ex: opportunity revenue) and assigning it to your marketing efforts based on the marketing engagement of the people involved in that opportunity.

 

There are many different methodologies for calculating attribution, often called “models.” A few of the more common models include “first touch” (all credit to the very first marketing engagement),” last touch” (all credit to the most recent marketing engagement), and “even split” (credit divided equally amongst all touches.) We’ll delve deeper into these and other types of models plus why you might choose one over another in a future post.

 

Cross-posted from the Perkuto blog.

When I go to events everyone in the Expo Hall tries to shove a whitepaper in my hand assuming I'll take it home and check it out later, but most of the time it ends up in the recycling bin.

 

We faced this issue for the past few years and made the strategic decision to make some of our events paperless. This forces our event staff to have real conversations with prospects before deciding which piece of content (if any) the prospect wants to receive and gives us a more unique follow up post-event (Here's that content you requested! vs. Nice to meet you last week).

 

Using two extra smart campaigns, we were able to remove our typical heavy load of paper at our booth. How did we get there?

 

1. Gather Content Requests

I have an existing lead scanning phone app as part of my Tech Stack that I was able to easily add an additional field to, but you could go paperless even if you’re using spreadsheets to upload event data.

Start with a field to capture this information. I have a string field called “Content Bundle Request” in Marketo connected to my lead scanning app field "Request Info". You could create a drop down or multi-select option in your CRM and then tie into Marketo. Within the lead scanning app, my sales team can select the content they want to share and get verbal consent from the prospect. I offer three different types of content to deliver.

 

 

Note: I have a complex back end system that determines valid consent based off of applicable laws which impacts this content request. If you decide to set up a similar paperless content request system you need to consult a lawyer about ability to gather consent because I only took two law classes in college and one was about torts #IAmNotALawyer.

 

My lead scanning app sends information to Marketo one way and cannot receive information back into the app. If someone was previously unsubscribed my sales team has no way of knowing when they submit the prospect to my system and the information does not send back into the app after the record is saved. The only way they could know about an unsubscribed prospect would be to go into Salesforce separately, which is unlikely never going to happen.

What happens if someone requests content but they are unsubscribed? I need to manage that process and make sure the prospect still has the opportunity to receive content. Despite being 'requested', we do not consider a verbal, unverifiable request transactional, so this email is not set to operational and cannot supersede an unsubscribe (<--- at least not in my opinion, consult your lawyer). In the event that someone is unsubscribed but they requested an email with content, I’ve set up a notification that goes to the person in charge of our tradeshow events. The notification’s intention is to let her know what prospect requested paperless content and the name of the employee who submitted the prospect’s interest. She follows up directly with the employee so they can sync with the unsubscribed individual to help them opt back into communications with us.

By placing the onus on the event coordinator, I diffuse any frustration from the sales team later if the prospect can't receive an email.  It also gives them a chance to have another conversation with the prospect to opt back in that gives the company a chance to regain a lost contact.

 

This notification is an easy set up in Marketo.

Smart List

Flow

Depending on the size of your organization, this might be hard to scale.

 

2. Create Your Content Experience

You could easily create a number of different emails that each have one piece of content linked within the body, but theoretically that could send a dozen emails to one prospect after the event. What works best for me is having many pieces of content “bundled” based on interest. Then we can analyze which pieces of content resonate with people based on their interaction with the email.

Even though the prospect is sent to Marketo from the phone app immediately, we don't send the email out until a few days after the tradeshow has ended. After the prospect was scanned they most likely kept walking the Expo Hall and it's unlikely that they'll check their email right then, or even read our email during the rest of the tradeshow. If we were to send the content instantly, it would most likely be ignored or deleted and the content never consumed. If you're recording this information via Excel or some other means that don't immediately populate in your Marketo instance, this gives you time to complete an upload when you're back from the event before sending out your content.

 

In the past, we sent a follow up email to everyone who met with us at our booth. Now we’re able to send a more personalized experience to people with content bundles as a follow up, providing them with the content they requested. In a separate campaign we communicate with anyone who did not request any particular content; they receive the generic follow up.

 

3. Keep Sales in the Loop

Sales wants to know which content bundles people have consumed and they never remember which email was requested for a particular prospect. Create an interesting moment that shares which content bundle the prospect requested for easy communication with your sales team.

 

Years in the making, months of blogging and it’s finally here: GDPR becomes officially enforceable in a matter of hours. Are you ready?

 

If not, here are a few quick pointers and resources to assist in your efforts.

 

Consent

The topic of consent is easily the most discussed. Key points:

 

Explicit permission is required; implied consent no longer qualifies.  If you are claiming legitimate interest, consult your legal team first.

 

Documentation is just as necessary as capturing consent.  All EU records in your database should have:

  • Opt-in date and timestamp
  • Opt-in source
  • Opt-in IP address (if available)

 

Remember, you can’t “buy” consent.  In other words, you cannot make consent a requirement to downloading a promoted white paper.  You CAN include a consent option on your form as an unchecked checkbox.

 

Be sure to Link all your forms and communications to your privacy policy.  Let your privacy policy do the heavy lifting, meaning contain all the details about data usage, storage, and protection.

 

Transparency in Data Usage

 

Under GDPR, lead scoring is considered user profiling, which now requires user consent. The same thing with any other propensity to purchase calculations—if you are using this to schedule follow-up sales calls, you must have permission to use an individual’s data in this capacity.

 

Data enhancements must also be declared, and past data audited. If you are enriching your data from a third party source, you need to state the origin and purpose.  Also think about where in the cycle your enrichment occurs, to avoid paying for enhancement if you do not have permission to retain records in your database or if data is kept for a limited period. (Ex: event reminders)

 

Munchkin code / Cookies

GDPR changes how we can use cookies but does not entirely rule it out. Cookie usage must be declared; “by using this website you agree…” messages no longer comply.  Visitors must be given the option to accept or decline cookie tracking.  If they refuse, then you have no choice but to disable cookies.

 

Just a reminder too, you will most likely need to change your setting that loads munchkin code as this is a departure from the current Do Not Track legislation.

 

Adjustments you’ll need to make:

  • Turn on ‘Do Not Track’ Settings in Marketo Admin
  • Post a Cookie Policy
  • Evaluate API Cookie Management Platforms - this will become more important with upcoming EU ePrivacy Directive legislation, which has different requirements for various types of cookies.

For more information, see the Marketo Dev site for details on configuring Munchkin code settings.

 

Preference Center

You will need to build a preference center to process the requests from individuals exercising their GDPR rights.

 

These rights include:

  • Opt-in and unsubscribes
  • Data exports and transfers
  • Data breach notifications
  • Policy requests
  • Data erasure (AKA “the right to be forgotten”)

 

Marketing

Marketing messages and analytics will change. Between consent for cookies (which may limit the behavioral data you have to score from) and the right to be forgotten, many of us are concerned that we won’t be able to track marketing performance and customer journeys for our websites accurately. In all honesty, your internal KPIs and goals will need adjustment. Make sure you know all of your April numbers and conversion rates so that you can see how to reset your goals to account for GDPR changes.

 

For other marketing ideas and tips, download our free GDPR Toolkit, loaded with helpful information and practical resources, including:

  • GDPR Marketing Communications LookBook- creative suggestions and visual examples for post-GDPR marketing.
  • A recording of my Marketo Summit presentation, Fearless Marketing in a GDPR World, which includes screenshots of how to set-up a preference center and data rights flow in Marketo.
  • GDPR FAQ eBook: Legal Questions. Straightforward Answers.
  • The Marketo Client’s Guide to GDPR Compliance
  • GDPR Data Processor Compliance Assessment

 

Get your free toolkit: http://bit.ly/2wvF1OZ

 

Stay informed

 

GDPR is just beginning, updates (and fines!) are sure to follow.  Learn from the missteps of other companies and adjust as grey areas are clarified—to stay informed on GDPR news, decisions and enforcement updates, subscribe to the ICO RSS feed: https://ico.org.uk/global/rss-feeds/

 

 

GDPR is here; it’s not the end but only the beginning.  Are you ready?

Miss my session at Summit? Here's a recap of my 7 steps to launching your first Account-Based Marketing strategy.

 

Account-Based Marketing is here to stay. In the digital age, it’s easy to get bogged down in the hustle and bustle of the MarTech capabilities and lose sight of what really matters: engagement. Because even though we’re marketing to accounts, it’s individuals that serve as internal champions to demonstrate the value of your product within their organization. So what does that mean for you?

 

In the end, it all comes down to understanding your audience. But first, we need to remember the foundation of any marketing strategy: what are we trying to get out of it?

 

On that note, here are seven steps to launching your first Account-Based Marketing strategy.

 

1. Determine your goals

goals.jpg

A few things to keep in mind when setting your goals.

  • Make sure they are quantifiable. Think "I want to influence 50 opportunities" rather than "I want to increase pipeline." If you can't look back and definitely determine whether you met your goals, you're doing it wrong.
  • Goals should be timely - this just means set dates for them. Put a reminder on your calendar in X number of days to evaluate whether you hit your target. If you don't hit it by your specified end date, that doesn't mean you failed. It just gives you a basis for planning next time around.
  • Don't forget that goals should be valuable to the business. Sure, a 43% click-through-rate feels great, but it won't influence your ARR. Think MQAs (Marketing Qualified Accounts), SQAs, or opportunities.
  • Get buy-in from sales! If sales isn’t ready for ABM’d leads (let's pretend that's a real word), your marketing efforts will be wasted in the transition to sales

 

Ok, you must be thinking. But my sales cycle is 18 months. I can't wait 18 months to determine whether my ABM strategy was successful!

You're right! So set KPIs for short-term evaluation. This is where you get to look at "vanity metrics" - look at deliverability, the number of engaged accounts, engagement within each account, and individual tactic success.

 

2. Define the Audience

bootcamp-target-market-meme.jpg

Marketing is expensive. It takes time, money, and resources. Put delicate effort into selecting your audience so that none of our hard-earned content goes to waste!

  • Strategically select your accounts, but it doesn’t end there!
  • Strategically select your contacts. You want to find people who will get excited about your product and who will want to spread the value of your offerings within the organization. More on this in a second...
  • Have your SDRs weigh in on account selection and job titles - they know what to look for!
  • Leverage resources: predictive, personas, behavior scoring (this will tell you what type of people engage with content you already have), and yes, intuition!

 

Don't forget to find a data provider that you trust. If you are sending emails, make sure they have a high validity rate. If you are sending direct mail, make sure they are good at providing addresses. Nothing is more discouraging than putting a ton of time and money into a campaign and realizing most of it made it in front of your prospects.

 

Now back to the contact selection. You know the term "Buying Center" that everyone's talking about? It's just a reference to the unofficial buying decision committees within each of your target accounts. To best market to each company, figure out everyone who has influence in the decision to buy your offering and market to them personally. For example, if you're selling software, you have to get IT on board no matter which department will be using the software, but the messaging to IT will be very different than the messaging you deliver to potential users. If you want more on this, comment below and I'll write another blog post!

 

3. Create your strategy

strategy.jpg

Notice that is is not the first step! Now that we know the why and the who, it's finally time to create the what! Start with the obvious - outline your content. Your content, like with most marketing strategies, should follow the basic buyer journey:

  1. Begin with brand awareness and thought leadership - now’s your chance to really demonstrate your value and build trust with your prospect
  2. Introduce pain points - you want your prospects to relate to the problems your product or service can solve
  3. Introduce interactive materials - ROI calculators, worksheets, free trials or demos, etc. Once they have a taste of life with you in it, they won't want to go back!
  4. Now we can get a little more aggressive with more sales-focused CTAs: “Call Us” vs “Check Out Our eBook” - these CTAs should point prospects in the direction of your goals
  5. Help your SDRs know how to reach out depending on demographic qualifications and engagement within each account

 

 

Make sure CTAs drive prospects to your goals, and adjust along the way to meet KPIs. Once you know what you're going to say, figure out how you're going to say it. What will you send? Emails? Retargeting ads? Web personalization? Social media placements? Direct mail? SDR outreach? Get creative. The possibilities are endless!

 

When you're developing this collateral, determine both the content and the design cohesively so that your outreach provides a consistent experience for your prospects. Keep the cadence in mind. Nobody wants to be over-emailed, but if you spread your messaging too far apart your prospects won't remember you between touches. A good way to get around this? Ongoing display ads.

 

4. Get Cliché and Smarket

smarketing.png

Don't take this for granted. Sales + marketing alignment will make or break your campaign! After you create your content strategy, get input from sales early on- make sure they’re as excited about it as you want your leads to be!

  • Set up your program to communicate all relevant information to sales, and give them a heads up as to how that information will be made available to them
  • Get aligned on the timeline - if you have joint goals, you must have a joint timeline to match
  • Let them know ahead of time which accounts you’ve chosen and when & how they should interact with them. Direction is everything!

 

5. Implement

mps.jpeg

Set up your program in Marketo, and integrate everything you possibly can to flawlessly orchestrate your tactics and gain cohesive reporting. I wrote a blog post on this a while back that addresses the technical side of this. Check it out here if you’re interested!

  • My biggest tip: leverage Engagement Programs to coordinate timing of complex campaigns with multiple channels. SO. HELPFUL.
  • Set up your target accounts if you have the ABM platform, and make sure sales have the chrome plugin. It's legit.
  • Test, test, test - both technically, and statistically to see what works and what doesn't.

 

6. Learn

learning.jpg

Just because you went live with your new ABM strategy doesn't mean you're done. Remember those KPIs we set at the beginning? Every single day, evaluate the performance of your program to make sure you're meeting your expectations, and if not, make the necessary adjustments. Remember, results take time! Sales cycles are longer with cold outbound.

  • Talk to sales! If morale is good, it's a great early sign.
  • Celebrate your wins and learn from your losses - both with marketing & with sales

 

If you have RCE, now is the time to use it. Go into your lifecycle and check the "Start Tracking by Account" box for each stage. Then you can use the Model Performance Analysis report for companies!

lifecycle.png analysis.png

Easy!

 

7. Rinse and Repeat...after you’ve made updates from your learnings of course!

Not only do you learn more each time, but you have more fun too! You worked heard creating this strategy, and if it works, there's no reason to throw it out. Find more target accounts and contacts, and do it again. Engage more accounts and watch the money roll in.

money.jpeg

The GDPR compliance deadline is looming…have you prepared for the different data rights scenarios in your database?

 

Screen Shot 1.png

 

It is likely that within your database, you’ll have varying levels of data processing rights. Common scenarios you’ll need to account for in your data rights center Marketo program:

 

  • Personal data to maintain and use - this encompasses both consent & legitimate interest.
  • Personal data to use for a limited time period, such as access to a webinar or event.
  • Personal data to maintain and use for limited purposes, such as only for transactional or account communications, and not for marketing messages or scoring.
  • Lapse in consent or legitimate interest. This could be time or action based.
  • Offline consent given, perhaps from direct mail, a live event, a phone conversation or a personal meeting.

 

There are many options and your data rights center needs to accommodate all the scenarios.

 

Building a Data Rights Center

 

Screen Shot 2.png

 

Just as you have a subscription center in Marketo, you’ll also want to build out a data rights center, detailing the rights you have to retain and process data, encompassing the scenarios previously mentioned.

 

To do this, there are a number of fields I find helpful and useful to retain:

 

  • Most recent activity date, most recent activity detail - important for supporting the “as long as necessary” data storage clause

 

  • GDPR data rights (Y/N) plus rights DateTimestamp - again supporting the “as long as necessary” clause

 

  • GDPR data rights source and notes - good for recordkeeping and using in smart list filters to limit processing, or define your audience for WTD nurtures, whitelisting, or data deletion.

 

If this sounds like a lot, it is. But remember, GDPR loves documentation!  If you’re ever subject to a compliance inquiry, you’ll be in a better position by having a complete data trail.

 

Data Rights Campaigns

 

Screen Shot 3.png

 

In the example above, these fields are populated if you have full data consent acquired with opt-in email consent. You would use something like this flow for populating fields with either consent or legitimate interest.

 

When setting up the smart list, remember, email consent CAN constitute data consent. And if you are claiming legitimate interest, be sure to consult with your legal team first. If going this route, you would set up a similar smart campaign for legitimate interest as defined with legal, such as legitimate interest via sales activity or an active contract.

 

In the data flow, populate each of the fields outlined. In this example, the data rights source is populated with the email opt-in source description. Then in the notes, categorize this as “opt in email consent.” It’s useful to have different fields for source and notes as the source could explain why you have legitimate interest or where consent came from. You can then populate your notes section with common phrases you can use in filters, such as “limited processing consent - no scoring” or “retain for 30 days only”. This helps adapt to the various data rights scenarios.


When establishing rights lapses: time stamps are important-- review consent date and most recent engagement. You might discover it’s time to send a whitelisting or wake the dead nurture to these records! If consent or legitimate interest does lapse, you’ll need campaigns to properly process the records, either deleting or marketing suspending them as appropriate.

 

Building a Preference Center to Manage Individual GDPR Rights

 

Screen Shot 4.png

 

Finally, you’ll also want to build a Preference Center to automate how you’ll process requests from consumers exercising their individual GDPR rights, including:

 

  • Opt-in and unsubscribes
  • Data exports and transfers
  • Data breach notification
  • Policy requests
  • Data erasure

 

 

Want more actionable tips plus other helpful GDPR resources? 

 

Download our Ultimate GDPR Toolkit, which contains:

 

  • The on-demand recording of my Marketo Summit breakout session, “Fearless Marketing in a GDPR World: Tips to Thrive Amidst New Regulations.”
  • Our new GDPR LookBook, chock full of creative suggestions and visual examples for post-GDPR marketing
  • The Marketo Client’s Guide to GDPR Compliance Whitepaper
  • GDPR FAQ eBook: Legal Questions. Straightforward Answers.
  • GDPR Data Processor Compliance Assessment

 

Get your copy now...it’s free!  http://bit.ly/2wvF1OZ

It’s an annual tradition at Marketing Nation Summit for Marketo to announce new features and product updates.

 

Similarly, Perkuto's post-Summit practice is to provide a summary of the discussions as well as commentary on the potential impact for your marketing operations. It’s our way of keeping you informed while keeping it real. So grab a cup of coffee — this post is a little longer than most but worth the time to read in its entirety.

 

Marketo Product Updates on Deck for 2018 - An Overview

This year, Marketo defined five main product priorities plus announced key enhancements in each area. The 30,000-foot overview:

  • UX: Garnishing audience “ooh’s” and “ah’s,” Marketo’s unveiled its new next-generation user interface, “Marketo Sky.” Entering into open beta this month, Sky is visually appealing and contains some highly-requested productivity enhancements.
  • Analytics: In a calculated (pun intended) and much-needed move, Marketo shored up its attribution and analytics capabilities with the acquisition of Bizible, a leading Marketing Performance Management solution.
  • AI: “AI” is the buzzword in marketing circles right now. In a timely move, Marketo announced new machine-learning capabilities for identifying your ideal customer and finding look-alike audiences (AudienceAI).
  • Marketing/Sales Alignment: In 2017, Marketo announced the ToutApp acquisition. In 2018, ToutApp is being rebranded as “Marketo Sales Engage” with tighter integration to the Marketo platform.
  • Platform: Marketo continues the ongoing quest for scalability, with additional changes to improve campaign throughput and speed plus a plan for improved LaunchPoint integrations.

Diving Deep: UX

Marketo’s next-generation user interface has been a long time coming; customers should expect an open beta version available in May 2018. More than just a cosmetic re-skinning, the new interface is a complete overhaul of Marketo’s front-end, using modern web technologies and providing a stronger foundation for continued development. Seasoned Marketo admins will especially relish the productivity improvements, including:


Saved Rules

Saved rules are collections of triggers/filters or flow steps that can be preserved and made accessible to your users. For example, you might have a specific set of smart list filters you use to email all customers of “product A,” including customer status, product entitlement, record viability, plus advanced logic to tie them together — you get the idea.


As we all know, (and likely have experienced at some point), these filters are easy to mess up. With the new interface, the admin can create a rule called “Customers of Product A” and drag that rule onto the canvas causing your previously saved filters/triggers to materialize. Currently, the saved rules feature operates globally, although there was a discussion of private vs. public rules possibly in the future. And in case you’re wondering, the same logic can also be applied to flow steps. Overall, the saved rules feature will save marketing operations staff time and error-proof the process. Well done, Marketo.

 

 

marketo saved rules

A saved rule and a list of filters it contains.

 

Mass Approvals and Activations

Are you regularly cloning your program templates? If so, you’ll be happy with this one. (If you aren’t, you should!) The mass approval and activation feature simplifies and streamlines the process of deploying programs by displaying a list of assets along with an easy way to approve or activate them in bulk. This is another substantial improvement and time-saving enhancement, not to mention relief from tedious and unnecessary clicks.

 

Approve multiple smart campaigns with a single action.

 

A pop-up notifications menu tells you when your mass action is complete.

 

Asset Expiration

Never manually update stale or outdated pages again! The new Sky will provide a way to give assets an expiration date, or in the case of smart campaigns, a deactivation date. Rest assured that visitors cannot access outdated pages (ex: a registration page for a past event) and lighten the load on your system by not keeping triggers active longer than necessary. Best of all, you’ll never need to backtrack work as landing pages can have a default or page-specific fall-back to show after the expiry date.

 

 

Easily set an expiration date for multiple assets.

 

My Token Updates

My Tokens are the key to scalable and efficient operations in Marketo. Sky introduces some token-related improvements, many of them targeted at power users with heavily-tokenized programs, including:

  • Token foldering: The ability to organize your tokens with sub-folders.

  • Token searchability: New keyword search capabilities within programs and folders.

  • No renaming: System prevents you from silently breaking your token references by restricting token renaming. This is useful but also annoying when you make a spelling mistake.
  • Token cloning: The alternative to renaming — cloning the token and renaming it.

  • See where tokens are used: A new context menu showing the usage and location of tokens, although the icon to access it is somewhat counter-intuitive at present as it looks like a "refresh" button. Currently this feature only supports tokens located in email header fields and rich text regions, limiting its usefulness, but hopefully this will become more comprehensive over time.

  • New token types: A simplified process to defining links and images as variables. Say goodbye to the previous process of inserting within text/rich text tokens; Sky’s new token types create an experience similar to the link/image dialogues inside of assets as well as ensure link tracking works correctly.


    Example of an image token dialogue, which allows you to pull directly from Design Studio files.

Global Search

Improving system organization, Sky is planned to include a global search box with an index spanning the entire platform, making every asset within reach from a single spot. The index not only captures the name of the asset but also the asset labels. Global search is a good improvement although there are limitations of the search function, include searching the content of the assets themselves. Perhaps we’ll see this addition down the road.

 

 

 

Labels

Labels are a new kind of metadata, which can apply to both programs and assets. Functioning similarly to “tags” on a blog post, labels enable freeform and unstructured metadata to sort, organize, and search your assets. There won’t be any validation around labels, meaning it will be up to Marketo admins to define and create clear taxonomies and conventions appropriate for their users and requirements, but overall, the addition of labels combined with global search is a powerful enhancement.

 

 

 

Labels offer a lot of flexibility, but make sure you develop a label strategy to make them consistent and therefore useful.

Other UX Improvements

Marketo’s list of updates doesn’t stop here. Of the other updates mentioned, some are currently in the beta while others are on the horizon:

  • My Marketo Homepage: Marketo will finally have a solid “homepage” experience when you log in, displaying familiar navigational tiles as well as dashboard-style widgets highlighting key metrics or system data. Marketo has wisely made this customizable (as no two companies would want the same thing) but which options are available is still TBD.

  • Filter the Tree: Reminiscent of a beefed-up Campaign Inspector except more readily accessible, users can filter the tree by date range, asset type, label (etc.) to limit the scope of what’s in focus when working in marketing activities.

  • Contextual help: Contextual information and guidance via help prompts throughout the interface.

  • Revamped Program Detail Page: More information, all in one place: in addition to mass approvals in bulk, the program summary page offers a revamped program schedule providing a full calendar experience and easier access to related information.
  • Revamped Smart Campaign Detail Page: Resolving previous UI inconsistencies and enhancing ease of use, admins can access a grid of campaign members and perform single flow actions just as you would in other person grids.

  • Revamped Asset Detail Page: Expect more accessible “used by” menus and buttons for primary actions. Additionally, the draft and approved version of an asset are now combined in a single node (as opposed to the draft being a child of the approved asset) with separate sets of action buttons to manipulate each version.

  • Revamped Landing Page Detail Page: The URL is now clickable and can be copied with a single click for easier access. PURL enablement is also more conveniently exposed on the detail page.

  • New Iconography: Introducing the lightning bolt for triggered campaigns!

  • Folder Level Permissions: Another long-awaited feature, it appears Marketo Sky will now make this possible.
  • Cookie Opt-In: Although not part of the current beta, Marketo intends to offer native cookie opt-in functionality in response to GDPR. There are, however, no immediate plans to support other requested GDPR features, such as person anonymization.
  • More Agile Release Cycle: Marketo Sky enhancements (and bug fixes) will no longer be tied to quarterly release cycles but will be shipped independently, possibly every few weeks.

 

Other Miscellaneous Good Stuff

Not strictly related to UX, Marketo announced a few other improvements in the UX session, which are mainly self-explanatory.

 

  • Add a CC Contact to Email Sends
  • Continuous Audience Sync for AdBridge: The existing AdBridge integration is pretty lame, requiring manual intervention. With continuous sync, it becomes much more useful.
  • Secure Tracking Links in Emails
  • Native Form Recaptcha Integration

The Need for More Powerful Analytics within Marketo

As I’m sure you’ve heard by now, Marketo purchased Bizible, the most significant acquisition in its history. Both a strategic and bold move, the addition of Bizible transforms what was previously a weak area of the Marketo platform into an area of strength.


When I first became a Marketo customer, I expected (perhaps naively) that Marketo would have a basic level of digital analytics built in, similar to Google Analytics. Unfortunately, this capability doesn’t exist with out-of-the-box in Marketo, a sore spot for many new customers.


While it’s possible to build, there’s a lot of heavy lifting required — custom JavaScript, form modifications, and many programs to track activities at the level of granularity you want. And adding to user pain, Marketo’s standard reports are just that — basic and not very customizable, limiting the ability to report on the data you capture.


Marketo does offer other advanced reporting solutions, but neither provide the full-featured marketing analytics that many companies need.


Advanced Reporting (a.k.a RCE to old-timers) offers some very useful pivot-table style analysis, but this area of the product has been unimproved for years, has limited customizability (for example, you are confined to a single multi-touch attribution model), and is very slow on large data sets.


Then there’s the new Marketing Performance Insights (MPI) tool, which seems more like a role-based dashboard for easy reporting on a selective group of KPIs - very useful, but not a full-featured marketing analytics solution.

 

The Significance of the Bizible Acquisition

Marketo can now justifiably claim a leadership position in marketing performance management. Marketo customers who adopt Bizible gain immediate access to better data and better reporting — and with greater ease. Bizible offers the following advantages:

  • Channel Tracking: Bizible is the only attribution tool I’m aware of that captures attribution data on the front end. It tracks digital channels out-of-the-box using a Google Analytics-style taxonomy that is familiar to almost all digital marketers.
  • It “Just Works”: Based on the half-dozen Bizible implementations I’ve participated in, the time-to-value is remarkably short. You can start collecting attribution data within a day by installing a managed package and placing a simple script on your web properties. A basic install requires no complex coding, no updates to forms, and there's no need for hundreds of attribution programs or campaigns.
  • Flexibility and Customizability: Bizible easily accommodates more complex requirements via multiple attribution models, ranging from simple to completely custom. And, you can even view all your Bizible data in a warehouse and integrate it within a broader business intelligence infrastructure.

Screenshot of Bizible's new "Discover" interface, also announced at Summit.

 

 

Bizible’s Impact on Marketo Customers

Will the acquisition of Bizible be an analytics game-changer for Marketo or another potentially-useful product add-on that is used by a relatively small percentage of the customer base? The answer, I believe, will primarily depend on cost.

 

At present, Bizible pricing is reportedly remaining about the same, which means there’s little immediate value for Marketo customers. Organizations interested in using Bizible will continue to do so with the only difference being where you send your payment.

 

However, if Marketo introduces a pricing model that makes acceptance a no-brainer — perhaps generous license discounts for Bizible adopters in exchange for longer overall Marketo contract lengths — then we might see a vast base of Marketo + Bizible users emerge. There's also the possibility for tighter integration between the two platforms, of course.

 

AI Enhancements

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the trend of the year, and Marketo is proactively responding. Marketo’s AI upgrades extend beyond a single product and include embedding machine-learning capabilities into an increasing number of areas across the platform. Current and planned features help users to find perfect customers (ICP Marketing), expand campaign audiences (AudienceAI) and enhance content relevance for customers based on prior content consumption patterns and topical interest. (ContentAI). Let’s take a deeper look at each one.

 

ICP Marketing

 

What it is: ICP (Ideal Customer Profile) helps you understand the audience you should be targeting by creating a profile of your “perfect” customer. Under the hood, it will be powered by Mintigo. With ICP, you’ll be able to feed a set of customers to analyze (either a smart list or static list) into a predictive model, which will then surface a set of customer attributes. After creating the model, you can fine-tune it, suppressing attributes that you believe are irrelevant or noise by assigning them a lower weighting. Finally, once your profile is defined, the model can assign your accounts a letter grade from A-D depending on how closely they match your ICP which also improves targeting and ABM prioritization.

 

What does it mean for customers? This type of look-alike profiling is already commonly available from predictive vendors, including Mintigo. It’s unclear if ICP introduces any capabilities that aren’t currently available from predictive vendors, and if a separate Mintigo subscription will be required. However, it’s possible that ICP represents a move to tighter native integration — perhaps one that doesn’t consume REST calls — not to mention other benefits that aren’t available with a third-party deployment. At this stage, we don’t have enough information to be sure.

 

AudienceAI

 

What it is: While ICP Marketing focuses on defining the ideal customer for your business, AudienceAI goes a level deeper to help you discover look-alike audiences at the program level. To begin, identify your audience for a campaign. AudienceAI will then suggest similar records within the database to consider, charting attribute similarities between the original and expanded audience. After you run the campaign, reports will provide a performance break-out between the original and extended audience, allowing you isolate and analyze the results as well as qualify the net lift received.


What does it mean for customers?
Like most things AI, I suspect this feature is garbage in/garbage out, meaning that if your campaign is poorly targeted in the first place, the AudienceAI suggestions will be limited or even flawed. I also wonder if you can place overriding constraints on the expanded audience. For example, you probably don’t want to invite North American prospects to your event in the Netherlands, no matter how similar they are in other respects. That being said, if you are following engagement marketing best practices and sending carefully targeted messages to smaller segments, this could be a beneficial way to expand the reach of your campaigns without sacrificing relevance.

 

 

 

ContentAI


What it is
: ContentAI is a rebranded amalgam of predictive web content (an outgrowth of real-time personalization) and predictive email content. The feature will crawl and index your web content and then display it in defined widget areas on your website or in emails based on user interest and content consumption patterns.

 

What does it mean for customers? ContentAI is not a new Marketo feature, but it did receive renewed emphasis at Summit. Expect it to be promoted widely in the coming year.

 

***Updated*** AI Lists


What it is
: AI lists will automatically analyze the membership of a static list and provide insights on its members. Clicking on the "Clusters" button under list actions will initiate the analysis.

 

cluster button.jpg

 

Marketo will give access to a number of characteristics that you can evaluate when looking for similarities and the ability to exclude some that might not be relevant.

 

cluster analysis.jpg

 

After the analysis is complete, Marketo will display a list of "clusters," which are populations in the list membership that Marketo has grouped together based on common characteristics.

 

clusters.jpg

You can then go into each cluster and see details about what makes them similar.

 

cluster detail.jpg

 

What does it mean for customers? AI lists is an interesting addition, providing access to the intelligence of machine learning directly within the Marketo UI. This feature could enable marketers to better understand their audiences, surface interesting segments they hadn't considered before, build better targeted campaigns, and improve personalization.

 

It would be nice to see a broader range of attributes available for the cluster analysis, as I can imagine there will be important business-specific traits that companies would want to include.

 

Fully Adaptive Campaigns

The ultimate vision for AI in marketing automation encompasses fully adaptive campaigns and the ability to pre-select a person’s next touch automatically across multiple channels. We’ve heard this concept before at both Summit 2016 and 2017. Are we any closer to fruition? Perhaps, although I expect it will be several years before it becomes a reality, given the complexity of the task.

 

Sales and Marketing Alignment

As mentioned earlier, ToutApp is being rebranding as “Marketo Sales Engage” (MSE) with tighter integration to the Marketo platform. What can you expect?

 

Live Feed

MSE features a “live feed” of recent updates relevant to sales. Essentially, a salesperson can dock this feed at the side of their screen and see real-time updates of new prioritized leads, lead actions across web and email, and other sales and marketing touches. Think of it as a revamped “Best Bets” view from Marketo Sales Insight (MSI) except in a better container.

 

Playbooks

MSE also includes the ability for sales to put marketing leads into automated nurtures (called “Playbooks”) as well as assistance in writing semi-personalized, templated emails.

 

What does it mean for customers?

One of the challenges I’ve perceived with the ToutApp acquisition is that there hasn’t been a compelling reason for users of competing solutions in the category to make a switch.

 

However, the introduction of a consolidated live feed that includes both sales and marketing data in one place is intriguing. Data disintegration is frustrating to sales; they need a simple, clear place to get all their insights. Pitching MSE as a master sales enablement tool may be a key selling point, especially if Bizible touchpoint data is integrated. Looking ahead, MSE could also be the natural successor to the aging MSI product, which has been stagnant for years. Perhaps existing MSI seats could be swapped for MSE licenses? Just an idea, Marketo.

 

Platform Scale and Performance Improvements

For many years, Marketo’s platform has been on an extended journey to increase the scale and performance of its underlying platform, dating back to the Orion Project in 2016. In Q1 2018, we saw the launch of “Campaign V2,” intended to improve the speed of trigger execution. The rollout is underway now, continuing throughout the year.

 

Immediately following on the heels of Campaign V2, “Campaign V3” is also in the works, designed to improve the speed of batch campaign execution. In practical terms, this means that (for example) if you send an email to 1 million people, that audience will be chunked up and processed in parallel, enabling your emails to deliver significantly faster.

 

Campaign Performance Troubleshooting

Marketo is also shifting campaign control into the hands of the user with the goal of improving campaign performance. Features announced:

 

  • Campaign priority control: Allows the user to determine the priority of campaigns without the use of hacks to game the system. The engine will also automatically boost priorities of flow steps that are lingering in the queue.
  • Visualize campaign relationships: Complex campaign interrelationships (especially when using the Request Campaign flow step) can be challenging to visualize. Marketo plans to introduce a visual tool to see these relationships better, which one PM compared to a “transit map.”
  • Identify Campaign Hotspots: This sounds like an auditing tool that will allow you to zoom in on “expensive” flow steps and identify problems that are slowing down the system. Common culprits are flow steps with many conditional choices; with the campaign hotspots tool, you’ll know for sure.

CRM Integration

We all know, a smooth CRM integration is essential and have experienced the pains when it is not. These CRM-sync improvements may seem obscure, but they will make life significantly easier for companies with complex environments or who are migrating to a new CRM.

 

  • Disconnect and reconnect CRM: Traditionally, CRM integration via a native connector has been permanent. Integrating with a different CRM using a native connector required migrating to a new Marketo instance, a painful and costly process. With this new tool, you’ll be able to disconnect your instance and reconnect to your new CRM safely.
  • Custom timestamp for sync: Currently, the Salesforce (SFDC) integration looks at the standard SystemModStamp field to determine whether a record has changed and if syncing is necessary. The system has its flaws as some SFDC organizations are connected to external systems that generate a lot of noisy updates. Marketo’s new feature would allow admins to specify a custom ModStamp field controlled by custom business logic, to ensure the sync only inspects records that have a meaningful change.
  • Sandbox refresh support: If you have a Marketo sandbox integrated with a Salesforce sandbox, you know refreshing the SFDC sandbox can cause problems. The good news: Marketo is actively addressing this use case to provide better support in the future.

LaunchPoint Integrations

LaunchPoint is growing up! Expect the integration ecosystem to mature in some very significant ways, bringing Marketo closer to a Salesforce AppExchange-style environment — all welcome changes for LaunchPoint integrators and their customers. What will the updates address?

 

  • One-Click Installs: LaunchPoint partners will be able to configure a package of configuration changes in a partner sandbox environment and package them together. LaunchPoint customers will then be able to easily install this managed package into their instance, immediately creating all required fields, objects, and other configuration changes. The net result? This enhancement will greatly reduce the time-to-value for LaunchPoint partner and customer integrations.
  • Partner Flow Actions: Partner Flow Actions (PFAs) provide an easy way for integrators to create new first-class actions into your arsenal of flow steps. They are essentially nicely branded webhooks you can insert into a LaunchPoint package to remove the complexity and expose the configurability in the familiar flow canvas of a smart campaign. For example, instead of configuring a webhook to send a physical gift item to a prospect, you can now use the “Send PFL Item” flow — a much more user-friendly step for most users.

  • Partner Triggers/Filters: This feature functions the same as a PFA but for triggers and filters.

Summary

The Marketo product team has a lot to juggle. Scaling the platform for enterprise use, paying off technical debt, keeping on top of the latest trends, aligning the roadmap with revenue goals, and keeping a (sometimes demanding) group of power users happy — it’s not easy to balance those priorities.

 

For long-time customers, there’s much to celebrate in this roadmap. Marketo Sky, once it has its kinks ironed out, will deliver greater productivity and also hopefully increase the velocity for future improvements. Platform enhancements are a rising tide that lifts all boats. And a more mature LaunchPoint ecosystem is vital because it will continue to crowdsource innovation to the many smart integration partners building on the platform. All that’s good stuff.

 

On the other hand, many of the other new features just announced may seem tantalizingly out-of-reach for customers who can’t afford big increases in contract value to get shiny new toys. Long-time users regularly voice concerns about the percentage of new features that appear as paid add-ons as opposed to improvements to the core product.

 

Marketo needs to pursue a balanced strategy, and it’s a delicate negotiation between delighting passionate customers who use Marketo daily and want it to improve continually vs. introducing new product lines that support Marketo’s ongoing growth.

What’s your reaction to this year’s roadmap? Please chime in with your thoughts!

 

(Cross-posted from the Perkuto blog. For a retrospective of previous Summit product discussions, see our posts from 2015, 2016, and 2017.)

Whether you came to my talk on the Analytics that Matter at Summit 2018 or not,  the real key to understanding how First Touch and Multi Touch Attribution is calculated in Marketo lies in this document.  Or rather your post Summit 2018 homework. Yes . . . I was that kinda TA. What happens when you reach success after the opp is created?  What happens if a person is acquired after the opp is created by placed on the opp before it closes?  All those questions you have will be answered by doing these word problems. 

This is used in Program Analyzer, Performance Insights, and Advanced Report Builder (aka Revenue Explorer/RCE)

 

You don't need a Marketo login.

Just take this document.  The Key to Finally Understanding how FT and MT Attribution are Calculated

  1. Print it out.
  2. Book a room for yourself and anyone who wants to do math word problems together for 45 minutes.  (Think college study group) Heck, make it a party and order pizza, or take one of your marketing team meetings and do it together. 
  3. Grab a pencil.
  4. Do the exercises.

 

This will be the most important 45 minutes you will ever spend if you really want to understand how attribution is calculated in Marketo.  You don't even have to read the first 2-3 pages.  The important thing you need to know lies in these rules below and the 20 exercises in the workbook attached.

Screen Shot 2018-05-06 at 1.21.28 PM.png

Note:  FT Rule #5 and MT Rule #4 are only applicable if you choose the Explicit setting. 

Screen Shot 2018-05-06 at 1.23.19 PM.png

Let me know how it goes.  Would love to hear what you guys think and if it was helpful. 

Post originally appeared on The Mind-Hive. If you're a Marketo Champion (current or alumni), we want to open source this effort and help elevate your expertise, brand championship, and overall mindshare. See the first post about the difference between a Hive-Mind and a Mind-Hive 


 

As I sit on the bus for my morning commute, with Mt Rainier looming over the freeway, I can't contain the motivation for writing this post. Marketo Summit 2018 is over, but I'm still feeling rippling aftershocks. Plenty of other folks will be writing more thorough recaps than I can hope to accomplish in the next 30 minutes, but I did want to share a few fun things.

Your #MarketoFu will be strong

During the Q&A for my session, someone (please comment so I can know your name) asked me flat out when I'd be making more Marketo-Fu videos. If you've missed these, there are 40 live, unedited training videos on YouTube to help new users get started and advanced users to keep ramping up the maturity curve. It needs to be said that I found it extremely humbling and gratifying that those videos have helped so many people. I had at least a couple dozen folks thank me for them or ask me if I was the same Joe from Marketo-fu. The dark-hearted consultant in me just died of happiness to know that a project born of laziness was actually useful. The original intent of Marketo-Fu was to not burn client hours on 30-minute calls to explain minutiae, like how to create user roles. It's the core tenet of marketing automation: anything you have to do more than once, you shouldn't have to do more ham once!    I'm still working through the details of where this new Marketo-Fu sandbox would need to exist, but I fully plan on new videos soon, and very soon. More tk...

#Krewechats are coming back!

Every year, the krewe is re-energized by what we learn at Summit, and the people we talk to. Last year, we stopped doing regular krewechats for a two reasons. First, a few of us had some big life changes, like moving across the country for AWS or finding out a little one was diagnosed with Leukemia (please send Dory Viscogliosi your love, her youngest is just as small and fierce as her template  ). Second - and just because we're being totally honest here - we didn't think it mattered. We had high hopes for getting Marketo's attention for creating a custom revvie award for that level of advocacy, but it didn't materialize. Fast-forward to this year, with the faces of Marketo HEROES blown up on 50 foot banners right on Mission street and throughout Moscone... well, it was reinvigorating. Our current plan is to meet monthly, with our first video being next week to do a full Summit debrief. Stay tuned for that chat! Maybe soon we could get Sarah Kennedy on one, since we're like besties now   

Life goal for Summit 2019: Gunning for Marketer of the Year

No one has ever accused me of doing things halfway. Between what I do as part of my job at AWS to train hundreds of Marketers to leverage our full tech stack to deliver measurable results for the business, to being a Marketo Champion, President of the Champion leadership committee, and Marketo-Fu/Krewechatter extraordinaire, I'm calling my shot and I'm taking aim. In 2019, I intend to win the Revvie award for Marketer of the Year, and I sincerely hope if you're reading this that you'll join me in this crusade and give me a run for the money!